Publications by authors named "Cathy Vendeville"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Nitrogen Dioxide Inhalation Exposures Induce Cardiac Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Production, Impair Mitochondrial Function and Promote Coronary Endothelial Dysfunction.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2020 07 30;17(15). Epub 2020 Jul 30.

Normandie Univ, UNIROUEN, UNICAEN ABTE, 14000 Caen et, 76 000 Rouen, France.

Traffic air pollution is a major health problem and is recognized as an important risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) diseases. In a previous experimental study, we showed that diesel exhaust (DE) exposures induced cardiac mitochondrial and CV dysfunctions associated with the gaseous phase. Here, we hypothesized that NO exposures to levels close to those found in DE induce a mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, which contribute to an endothelial dysfunction, an early indicator for numerous CV diseases. For this, we studied the effects of NO on ROS production and its impacts on the mitochondrial, coronary endothelial and cardiac functions, after acute (one single exposure) and repeated (three h/day, five days/week for three weeks) exposures in Wistar rats. Acute NO exposure induced an early but reversible mitochondrial ROS production. This event was isolated since neither mitochondrial function nor endothelial function were impaired, whereas cardiac function assessment showed a reversible left ventricular dysfunction. Conversely, after three weeks of exposure this alteration was accompanied by a cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction highlighted by an alteration of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis and oxidative phosphorylation and an increase in mitochondrial ROS production. Moreover, repeated NO exposures promoted endothelial dysfunction of the coronary arteries, as shown by reduced acetylcholine-induced vasodilatation, which was due, at least partially, to a superoxide-dependent decrease of nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. This study shows that NO exposures impair cardiac mitochondrial function, which, in conjunction with coronary endothelial dysfunction, contributes to cardiac dysfunction. Together, these results clearly identify NO as a probable risk factor in ischemic heart diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17155526DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7432061PMC
July 2020

Short-and long-term administration of imeglimin counters cardiorenal dysfunction in a rat model of metabolic syndrome.

Endocrinol Diabetes Metab 2020 Jul 16;3(3):e00128. Epub 2020 Apr 16.

UNIROUEN Inserm U1096 FHU-REMOD-VHF Normandie Univ Rouen France.

Introduction: Imeglimin, a glucose-lowering agent targeting mitochondrial bioenergetics, decreases reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction and improves glucose homeostasis. We investigated whether this is associated with protective effects on metabolic syndrome-related left ventricular (LV) and vascular dysfunctions.

Methods: We used Zucker rats to assess the effects on LV function, LV tissue perfusion, LV oxidative stress and vascular function induced by imeglimin administered orally for 9 or 90 days at a dose of 150 mg/kg twice daily.

Results: Compared to untreated animals, 9- and 90-day imeglimin treatment decreased LV end-diastolic pressure and LV end-diastolic pressure-volume relation, increased LV tissue perfusion and decreased LV ROS production. Simultaneously, imeglimin restored acetylcholine-mediated coronary relaxation and mesenteric flow-mediated dilation. One hour after imeglimin administration, when glucose plasma levels were not yet modified, imeglimin reduced LV mitochondrial ROS production and improved LV function. Ninety-day imeglimin treatment reduced related LV and kidney fibrosis and improved kidney function.

Conclusion: In a rat model, mimicking Human metabolic syndrome, imeglimin immediately countered metabolic syndrome-related cardiac diastolic and vascular dysfunction by reducing oxidative stress/increased NO bioavailability and improving myocardial perfusion and after 90-day treatment myocardial and kidney structure, effects that are, at least in part, independent from glucose control.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/edm2.128DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7375119PMC
July 2020

An integrated functional and transcriptomic analysis reveals that repeated exposure to diesel exhaust induces sustained mitochondrial and cardiac dysfunctions.

Environ Pollut 2019 Mar 17;246:518-526. Epub 2018 Dec 17.

Normandie Univ, UNIROUEN, UNICAEN, ABTE, 14000 Caen et 76 000 Rouen, France. Electronic address:

Diesel exhaust (DE) contributes to air pollution, an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. However, the mechanisms by which DE exposure induces cardiovascular dysfunction remain unknown and there is still debate on the contribution of the primary particulate matter (PM) fraction compared to the gaseous phase. Although the mitochondria play a key role in the events leading to cardiovascular diseases, their role in DE-induced cardiovascular effects has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to highlight cardiac and mitochondrial events that could be disrupted following acute and/or repeated DE exposures and the contribution of gaseous pollutants to these effects. To address this question, Wistar rats were exposed to DE generated under strictly controlled and characterized conditions and extracted upstream or downstream of the diesel particulate filter (DPF). Evaluation of the cardiac function after acute DE exposure showed a disturbance in echocardiographic parameters, which persisted and worsened after repeated exposures. The presence of the DPF did not modify the cardiovascular dysfunction revealing an important implication of the gas phase in this response. Surprisingly, redox parameters were not altered by DE exposures while an alteration in mitochondrial oxidative capacity was observed. Exploration of the mitochondrial function demonstrated a more specific alteration in complex I of the respiratory chain after repeated exposures, which was further confirmed by transcriptional analysis of left ventricular (LV) tissue. In conclusion, this work provides new insights into cardiovascular effects induced by DE, demonstrating a cardiac mitochondrial impairment associated with the gaseous phase. These effects suggest deleterious consequences in terms of cardiac function for vulnerable populations with underlying energy deficit such as patients with heart failure or the elderly.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2018.12.049DOI Listing
March 2019

Comparative study of diesel and biodiesel exhausts on lung oxidative stress and genotoxicity in rats.

Environ Pollut 2018 Apr 8;235:514-524. Epub 2018 Jan 8.

Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, UNIROUEN, ABTE, 14000 Caen et 76000, Rouen, France; Centre François Baclesse, Caen, France. Electronic address:

The contribution of diesel exhaust to atmospheric pollution is a major concern for public health, especially in terms of occurrence of lung cancers. The present study aimed at addressing the toxic effects of a repeated exposure to these emissions in an animal study performed under strictly controlled conditions. Rats were repeatedly exposed to the exhaust of diesel engine. Parameters such as the presence of a particle filter or the use of gasoil containing rapeseed methyl ester were investigated. Various biological parameters were monitored in the lungs to assess the toxic and genotoxic effects of the exposure. First, a transcriptomic analysis showed that some pathways related to DNA repair and cell cycle were affected to a limited extent by diesel but even less by biodiesel. In agreement with occurrence of a limited genotoxic stress in the lungs of diesel-exposed animals, small induction of γ-H2AX and acrolein adducts was observed but not of bulky adducts and 8-oxodGuo. Unexpected results were obtained in the study of the effect of the particle filter. Indeed, exhausts collected downstream of the particle filter led to a slightly higher induction of a series of genes than those collected upstream. This result was in agreement with the formation of acrolein adducts and γH2AX. On the contrary, induction of oxidative stress remained very limited since only SOD was found to be induced and only when rats were exposed to biodiesel exhaust collected upstream of the particle filter. Parameters related to telomeres were identical in all groups. In summary, our results point to a limited accumulation of damage in lungs following repeated exposure to diesel exhausts when modern engines and relevant fuels are used. Yet, a few significant effects are still observed, mostly after the particle filter, suggesting a remaining toxicity associated with the gaseous or nano-particular phases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2017.12.077DOI Listing
April 2018

Physiological role of endothelin-1 in flow-mediated vasodilatation in humans and impact of cardiovascular risk factors.

J Hypertens 2017 06;35(6):1204-1212

aDepartment of Pharmacology, Rouen University HospitalbInstitut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) U1096cInstitute for Research and Innovation in Biomedicine, Normandy University, University of RouendCentre d'Investigation Clinique (CIC)-INSERM 1404, Rouen University HospitaleEquipe d'Accueil (EA) 4651, Rouen, France.

Objectives: The current study addressed the hypothesis that the local decrease in endothelin-1 (ET-1) bioavailability during sustained flow increases contributes to endothelium-dependent, flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) of conduit arteries and is altered in presence of cardiovascular risk factors.

Methods And Results: In nine young healthy individuals, the decrease in local ET-1 plasma levels and radial artery FMD in response to hand skin heating (from 34 to 44 °C) was not affected by endothelin type A (ETA) receptor blockade, achieved using the brachial infusion of BQ-123 (100 nmol/min per l of forearm), as compared with physiological saline (0.9% NaCl) infusion. In contrast, endothelin type B (ETB) receptor blockade with BQ-788 (10 nmol/min per l) suppressed the decrease in plasma ET-1 during heating and reduced FMD, without altering nitric oxide release. The coinfusion of BQ-123 did not affect the inhibitory effect of ETB receptor blockade on the decrease in ET-1 plasma levels during heating but prevented the reduction in FMD. Basal radial artery parameters, systemic hemodynamics, and endothelium-independent dilatation to glyceryl trinitrate were not modified by ETA and/or ETB blockade. In a general population of 40 participants without treatment or major cardiovascular diseases, including the nine healthy individuals, the reduction in endothelin-1 level during heating was correlated with FMD (r = -0.55, P < 0.001) and decreased with increased age (r = 0.49, P = 0.001), mean arterial blood pressure (r = 0.48, P = 0.002), and total cholesterol level (r = 0.37, P = 0.024).

Conclusion: The uptake of endothelin-1 by ETB receptors contributes to conduit artery FMD, preventing its vasoconstrictor action mediated by ETA receptors. The alteration of this mechanism by cardiovascular risk factors may contribute to endothelial dysfunction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HJH.0000000000001307DOI Listing
June 2017

High-efficiency on-line haemodiafiltration improves conduit artery endothelial function compared with high-flux haemodialysis in end-stage renal disease patients.

Nephrol Dial Transplant 2014 Feb 13;29(2):414-22. Epub 2013 Nov 13.

Department of Pharmacology, Rouen University Hospital, Rouen, France.

Background: Middle molecular weight uraemic toxins are considered to play an important role in vascular dysfunction and cardiovascular outcomes in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Recent dialysis techniques based on convection, specifically high-efficiency on-line haemodiafiltration (HDF), enhance the removal of middle molecular weight toxins and reduce all-cause mortality in haemodialysis (HD) patients. However, the mechanisms of these improved outcomes remain to be established.

Methods: This prospective study randomly assigned 42 ESRD patients to switch from high-flux HD to high-efficiency on-line HDF (n=22) or to continue HD (n=20). Brachial artery endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilatation, central pulse pressure, carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT), internal diastolic diameter and distensibility and circulating markers of uraemia, inflammation and oxidative stress were blindly assessed before and after a 4-month follow-up.

Results: Brachial flow-mediated dilatation and carotid artery distensibility increased significantly in the HDF group compared with HD, while carotid IMT and diameter remained similar. HDF decreased predialysis levels of the uraemic toxins β2-microglobulin, phosphate and blood TNFα mRNA expression. Oxidative stress markers were not different between the HD and HDF groups. Blood mRNA expression of protein kinase C β2, an endothelial NO-synthase (eNOS) inhibitor, decreased significantly with HDF.

Conclusions: High-efficiency on-line HDF prevents the endothelial dysfunction and stiffening of the conduit arteries in ESRD patients compared with high-flux HD. HDF decreases uraemic toxins, vascular inflammation, and is associated with subsequent improvement in eNOS functionality. These results suggest that reduced endothelial dysfunction may be an intermediate mechanism explaining the beneficial outcomes associated with HDF.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ndt/gft448DOI Listing
February 2014

Xanthine oxidase contributes to mitochondrial ROS generation in an experimental model of cocaine-induced diastolic dysfunction.

J Cardiovasc Pharmacol 2012 Dec;60(6):538-43

University of Rouen, INSERM, Rouen, France.

Recent studies have shown that long-term cocaine use induces diastolic impairment and a myocardial oxidative stress. Recently, we have reported that cocaine-induced cardiac dysfunction may be due to a mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction, which occurs at the same time as xanthine oxidase (XO) activation. In this work, we hypothesized that XO activation contributes to mitochondrial ROS overproduction, which in turn contributes to diastolic dysfunction. To test this, we used a well-established in vivo model of cocaine-induced diastolic dysfunction. In this experimental model treated with or without allopurinol, an inhibitor of XO, we measured mitochondrial ROS production and function. Mitochondrial alterations were characterized by an increase in oxygen consumption through complexes I and III, a reduction in ATP production, and an increased ROS production specifically in isolated interfibrillar mitochondria. Allopurinol treatment prevented the rise in mitochondrial ROS levels and the decrease in ATP production. In the same way, allopurinol treatment improved ventricular relaxation with a decrease in Tau, an index of left ventricle relaxation and of end-diastolic pressure volume relation. These results confirmed the critical role of XO in the sequence of events leading to cocaine-induced cardiac dysfunction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/FJC.0b013e318271223cDOI Listing
December 2012

Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids contribute with altered nitric oxide and endothelin-1 pathways to conduit artery endothelial dysfunction in essential hypertension.

Circulation 2012 Mar;125(10):1266-75

Department of Pharmacology, Rouen University Hospital, France.

Background: We sought to clarify, using functional and biological approaches, the role of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, nitric oxide (NO)/reactive oxygen species balance, and endothelin-1 in conduit artery endothelial dysfunction during essential hypertension.

Methods And Results: Radial artery diameter and mean wall shear stress were determined in 28 untreated patients with essential hypertension and 30 normotensive control subjects during endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilatation induced by hand skin heating. The role of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids and NO was assessed with the brachial infusion of inhibitors of cytochrome P450 epoxygenases (fluconazole) and NO synthase (N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine [L-NMMA]). Compared with controls, hypertensive patients exhibited a decreased flow-mediated dilatation in response to postischemic hyperemia as well as to heating, as shown by the lesser slope of their diameter-shear stress relationship. In controls, heating-induced flow-mediated dilatation was reduced by fluconazole, L-NMMA, and, to a larger extent, by L-NMMA+fluconazole. In patients, flow-mediated dilatation was not affected by fluconazole and was reduced by L-NMMA and L-NMMA+fluconazole to a lesser extent than in controls. Furthermore, local plasma epoxyeicosatrienoic acids increased during heating in controls (an effect diminished by fluconazole) but not in patients. Plasma nitrite, an indicator of NO availability, increased during heating in controls (an effect abolished by L-NMMA) and, to a lesser extent, in patients, whereas, inversely, reactive oxygen species increased more in patients (an effect diminished by L-NMMA). Plasma endothelin-1 decreased during heating in controls but not in patients.

Conclusions: These results show that an impaired role of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids contributes, together with an alteration in NO/reactive oxygen species balance and endothelin-1 pathway, to conduit artery endothelial dysfunction in essential hypertension.

Clinical Trial Registration: https://www.eudract.ema.europa.eu. Unique identifier: RCB2007-A001-10-53.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.111.070680DOI Listing
March 2012