Publications by authors named "Cathryn J Poulton"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Severe presentation of WDR62 mutation: is there a role for modifying genetic factors?

Am J Med Genet A 2014 Sep 19;164A(9):2161-71. Epub 2014 May 19.

Department of Clinical Genetics, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, Germany.

Mutations in WDR62 are associated with primary microcephaly; however, they have been reported with wide phenotypic variability. We report on six individuals with novel WDR62 mutations who illustrate this variability and describe three in greater detail. Of the three, one lacks neuromotor development and has severe pachygyria on MRI, another has only delayed speech and motor development and moderate polymicrogyria, and the third has an intermediate phenotype. We observed a rare copy number change of unknown significance, a 17q25qter duplication, in the first severely affected individual. The 17q25 duplication included an interesting candidate gene, tubulin cofactor D (TBCD), crucial in microtubule assembly and disassembly. Sequencing of the non-duplicated allele showed a TBCD missense mutation, predicted to cause a deleterious p.Phe1121Val substitution. Sequencing of a cohort of five patients with WDR62 mutations, including one with an identical mutation and different phenotype, plus 12 individuals with diagnosis of microlissencephaly and another individual with mild intellectual disability (ID) and a 17q25 duplication, did not reveal TBCD mutations. However, immunostaining with tubulin antibodies of cells from patients with both WDR62 and TBCD mutation showed abnormal tubulin network when compared to controls and cells with only the WDR62 mutation. Therefore, we propose that genetic factors contribute to modify the severity of the WDR62 phenotype and, although based on suggestive evidence, TBCD could function as one of such factors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.36611DOI Listing
September 2014

A single strand that links multiple neuropathologies in human disease.

Brain 2014 Apr 5;137(Pt 4):e266. Epub 2013 Aug 5.

Department of Clinical Genetics, Erasmus MC, University Medical Centre Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/brain/awt197DOI Listing
April 2014

RTTN mutations link primary cilia function to organization of the human cerebral cortex.

Am J Hum Genet 2012 Sep 30;91(3):533-40. Epub 2012 Aug 30.

Department of Clinical Genetics, Erasmus University Medical Center (Erasmus MC), P.O. Box 2040, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Polymicrogyria is a malformation of the developing cerebral cortex caused by abnormal organization and characterized by many small gyri and fusion of the outer molecular layer. We have identified autosomal-recessive mutations in RTTN, encoding Rotatin, in individuals with bilateral diffuse polymicrogyria from two separate families. Rotatin determines early embryonic axial rotation, as well as anteroposterior and dorsoventral patterning in the mouse. Human Rotatin has recently been identified as a centrosome-associated protein. The Drosophila melanogaster homolog of Rotatin, Ana3, is needed for structural integrity of centrioles and basal bodies and maintenance of sensory neurons. We show that Rotatin colocalizes with the basal bodies at the primary cilium. Cultured fibroblasts from affected individuals have structural abnormalities of the cilia and exhibit downregulation of BMP4, WNT5A, and WNT2B, which are key regulators of cortical patterning and are expressed at the cortical hem, the cortex-organizing center that gives rise to Cajal-Retzius (CR) neurons. Interestingly, we have shown that in mouse embryos, Rotatin colocalizes with CR neurons at the subpial marginal zone. Knockdown experiments in human fibroblasts and neural stem cells confirm a role for RTTN in cilia structure and function. RTTN mutations therefore link aberrant ciliary function to abnormal development and organization of the cortex in human individuals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2012.07.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3511998PMC
September 2012

COL4A2 mutation associated with familial porencephaly and small-vessel disease.

Eur J Hum Genet 2012 Aug 15;20(8):844-51. Epub 2012 Feb 15.

Department of Clinical Genetics, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Familial porencephaly, leukoencephalopathy and small-vessel disease belong to the spectrum of disorders ascribed to dominant mutations in the gene encoding for type IV collagen alpha-1 (COL4A1). Mice harbouring mutations in either Col4a1 or Col4a2 suffer from porencephaly, hydrocephalus, cerebral and ocular bleeding and developmental defects. We observed porencephaly and white matter lesions in members from two families that lack COL4A1 mutations. We hypothesized that COL4A2 mutations confer genetic predisposition to porencephaly, therefore we sequenced COL4A2 in the family members and characterized clinical, neuroradiological and biochemical phenotypes. Genomic sequencing of COL4A2 identified the heterozygous missense G1389R in exon 44 in one family and the c.3206delC change in exon 34 leading to frame shift and premature stop, in the second family. Fragmentation and duplication of epidermal basement membranes were observed by electron microscopy in a c.3206delC patient skin biopsy, consistent with abnormal collagen IV network. Collagen chain accumulation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress have been proposed as cellular mechanism in COL4A1 mutations. In COL4A2 (3206delC) fibroblasts we detected increased rates of apoptosis and no signs of ER stress. Mutation phenotypes varied, including porencephaly, white matter lesions, cerebellar and optic nerve hypoplasia and unruptured carotid aneurysm. In the second family however, we found evidence for additional factors contributing to the phenotype. We conclude that dominant COL4A2 mutations are a novel major risk factor for familial cerebrovascular disease, including porencephaly and small-vessel disease with reduced penetrance and variable phenotype, which might also be modified by other contributing factors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ejhg.2012.20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3400734PMC
August 2012

Microcephaly with simplified gyration, epilepsy, and infantile diabetes linked to inappropriate apoptosis of neural progenitors.

Am J Hum Genet 2011 Aug;89(2):265-76

Department of Clinical Genetics, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

We describe a syndrome of primary microcephaly with simplified gyral pattern in combination with severe infantile epileptic encephalopathy and early-onset permanent diabetes in two unrelated consanguineous families with at least three affected children. Linkage analysis revealed a region on chromosome 18 with a significant LOD score of 4.3. In this area, two homozygous nonconserved missense mutations in immediate early response 3 interacting protein 1 (IER3IP1) were found in patients from both families. IER3IP1 is highly expressed in the fetal brain cortex and fetal pancreas and is thought to be involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress response. We reported one of these families previously in a paper on Wolcott-Rallison syndrome (WRS). WRS is characterized by increased apoptotic cell death as part of an uncontrolled unfolded protein response. Increased apoptosis has been shown to be a cause of microcephaly in animal models. An autopsy specimen from one patient showed increased apoptosis in the cerebral cortex and pancreas beta cells, implicating premature cell death as the pathogenetic mechanism. Both patient fibroblasts and control fibroblasts treated with siRNA specific for IER3IP1 showed an increased susceptibility to apoptotic cell death under stress conditions in comparison to controls. This directly implicates IER3IP1 in the regulation of cell survival. Identification of IER3IP1 mutations sheds light on the mechanisms of brain development and on the pathogenesis of infantile epilepsy and early-onset permanent diabetes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2011.07.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3155199PMC
August 2011