Publications by authors named "Catherine M Ludolph"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Recent Advances in Smart Biomaterials for the Detection and Treatment of Autoimmune Diseases.

Adv Funct Mater 2020 Sep 13;30(37). Epub 2020 Mar 13.

McKetta Department of Chemical Engineering, 200 E. Dean Keeton St. Stop C0400, Austin, TX, USA, 78712.

Autoimmune diseases are a group of debilitating illnesses that are often idiopathic in nature. The steady rise in the prevalence of these conditions warrants new approaches for diagnosis and treatment. Stimuli-responsive biomaterials also known as "smart", "intelligent" or "recognitive" biomaterials are widely studied for their applications in drug delivery, biosensing and tissue engineering due to their ability to produce thermal, optical, chemical, or structural changes upon interacting with the biological environment. This critical analysis highlights studies within the last decade that harness the recognitive capabilities of these biomaterials towards the development of novel detection and treatment options for autoimmune diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adfm.201909556DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7566744PMC
September 2020

QCM-D assay for quantifying the swelling, biodegradation, and protein adsorption of intelligent nanogels.

J Appl Polym Sci 2020 Jul 31;137(25). Epub 2019 Oct 31.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 107 W. Dean Keeton St., Stop C0800, Austin, Texas P. O. Box 78712.

Environmentally responsive nanomaterials have been developed for drug delivery applications, in an effort to target and accumulate therapeutic agents at sites of disease. Within a biological system, these nanomaterials will experience diverse conditions which encompass a variety of solute identities and concentrations. In this study, we developed a new quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) assay, which enabled the quantitative analysis of nanogel swelling, protein adsorption, and biodegradation in a single experiment. As a proof of concept, we employed this assay to characterize non-degradable and biodegradable poly(acrylamide--methacrylic acid) nanogels. We compared the QCM-D results to those obtained by dynamic light scattering to highlight the advantages and limitations of each method. We detailed our protocol development and practical recommendations, and hope that this study will serve as a guide for others to design application-specific QCM-D assays within the nanomedicine domain.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/app.48655DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8562820PMC
July 2020

Synthetic networks with tunable responsiveness, biodegradation, and molecular recognition for precision medicine applications.

Sci Adv 2019 09 27;5(9):eaax7946. Epub 2019 Sep 27.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA.

Formulations and devices for precision medicine applications must be tunable and multiresponsive to treat heterogeneous patient populations in a calibrated and individual manner. We engineered modular poly(acrylamide-co-methacrylic acid) copolymers, cross-linked into multiresponsive nanogels with either a nondegradable or degradable disulfide cross-linker, that were customized via orthogonal chemistries to target biomarkers of an individual patient's disease or deliver multiple therapeutic modalities. Upon modification with functional small molecules, peptides, or proteins, these nanomaterials delivered methylene blue with environmental responsiveness, transduced visible light for photothermal therapy, acted as a functional enzyme, or promoted uptake by cells. In addition to quantifying the nanogels' composition, physicochemical characteristics, and cytotoxicity, we used a QCM-D method for characterizing nanomaterial degradation and a high-throughput assay for cellular uptake. In conclusion, we generated a tunable nanogel composition for precision medicine applications and new quantitative protocols for assessing the bioactivity of similar platforms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.aax7946DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6764836PMC
September 2019
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