Publications by authors named "Catalina Liliana Andrei"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Some Perspectives on Hypersensitivity to Coronary Stents.

Int J Gen Med 2021 10;14:4327-4336. Epub 2021 Aug 10.

Medical and Pharmaceutical Research Unit/Competitive, Interdisciplinary Research Integrated Platform "Dunărea de Jos", ReForm-UDJG, Research Centre in the Field of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, Clinical Medical Department, "Dunărea de Jos" University of Galati, Galati, 800010, Romania.

The development of coronary stents has represented a revolution in the treatment of coronary heart disease. Beyond their many advantages, stents also have their limitations and complications. Allergic reactions to coronary stents are more common than acknowledged. These stented patients are exposed to foreign substances inserted in direct contact with the coronary intima. Hypersensitivity to stent components and drugs prescribed after stent insertion together with any environmental exposure seem to contribute to these adverse reactions. Patients can present to the hospital with a wide range of symptoms and multiple complications, the most important ones being instent restenosis and stent thrombosis. Although not very common (and not always easy to identify), allergic reactions after coronary or peripheral stents should be taken into account. Careful selection of patients (for elective stent implantation) depending on the propensity to allergies, although hard to achieve, represents a key factor in reducing the number of these complications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S326679DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8364397PMC
August 2021

Predicting the environmental suitability for onchocerciasis in Africa as an aid to elimination planning.

PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2021 Jul 28;15(7):e0008824. Epub 2021 Jul 28.

Department of Health Policy Planning and Management, University of Health and Allied Sciences, Ho, Ghana.

Recent evidence suggests that, in some foci, elimination of onchocerciasis from Africa may be feasible with mass drug administration (MDA) of ivermectin. To achieve continental elimination of transmission, mapping surveys will need to be conducted across all implementation units (IUs) for which endemicity status is currently unknown. Using boosted regression tree models with optimised hyperparameter selection, we estimated environmental suitability for onchocerciasis at the 5 × 5-km resolution across Africa. In order to classify IUs that include locations that are environmentally suitable, we used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to identify an optimal threshold for suitability concordant with locations where onchocerciasis has been previously detected. This threshold value was then used to classify IUs (more suitable or less suitable) based on the location within the IU with the largest mean prediction. Mean estimates of environmental suitability suggest large areas across West and Central Africa, as well as focal areas of East Africa, are suitable for onchocerciasis transmission, consistent with the presence of current control and elimination of transmission efforts. The ROC analysis identified a mean environmental suitability index of 0·71 as a threshold to classify based on the location with the largest mean prediction within the IU. Of the IUs considered for mapping surveys, 50·2% exceed this threshold for suitability in at least one 5 × 5-km location. The formidable scale of data collection required to map onchocerciasis endemicity across the African continent presents an opportunity to use spatial data to identify areas likely to be suitable for onchocerciasis transmission. National onchocerciasis elimination programmes may wish to consider prioritising these IUs for mapping surveys as human resources, laboratory capacity, and programmatic schedules may constrain survey implementation, and possibly delaying MDA initiation in areas that would ultimately qualify.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0008824DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8318275PMC
July 2021

Myocardial bridging-an unusual cause of Wellens syndrome: A case report.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2020 Oct;99(41):e22491

Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy.

Rationale: Coronary chest pain is usually ischemic in etiology and has various electrocardiographic presentations. Lately, it has been recognized that myocardial bridging (MB) with severe externally mechanical compression of an epicardial coronary artery during systole may result in myocardial ischemia. Such a phenomenon can be associated with chronic angina pectoris, acute coronary syndromes (ACS), coronary spasm, ventricular septal rupture, arrhythmias, exercise-induced atrioventricular conduction blocks, transient ventricular dysfunction, and sudden death.

Patient Concerns: We report the case of a 58-year-old woman presenting with recurrent episodes of constrictive chest pain during exercise within the last 2 weeks. Except for obesity, general and cardiovascular clinical examination on admission were normal.

Diagnoses: The resting 12 lead electrocardiogram (ECG) revealed changes typically for Wellens syndrome. High-sensitive cardiac troponin I was normal. We established the diagnosis of low-risk non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome with a Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events risk score of 92 points.

Interventions: The patient underwent coronary angiography, who showed subocclusive dynamic obstruction of the left anterior descending artery due to MB.

Outcomes: The patient was managed conservatively. Her hospital course was uneventful and she was discharged on pharmacological therapy (clopidogrel, bisoprolol, amlodipine, atorvastatin, and metformin) with well-controlled symptoms on followup.

Lessons: MB is an unusual cause of myocardial ischemia. Wellens syndrome is an unusual presentation of ACS. We present herein a rare case of Wellens syndrome caused by MB. This case highlights the importance of subtle and frequently overseen ECG findings when assessing patients with chest pain and second, the importance of considering nonatherosclerotic causes for ACS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000022491DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7544376PMC
October 2020

Estimating global injuries morbidity and mortality: methods and data used in the Global Burden of Disease 2017 study.

Inj Prev 2020 10 24;26(Supp 1):i125-i153. Epub 2020 Aug 24.

Department of Pharmacy, Adigrat University, Adigrat, Ethiopia.

Background: While there is a long history of measuring death and disability from injuries, modern research methods must account for the wide spectrum of disability that can occur in an injury, and must provide estimates with sufficient demographic, geographical and temporal detail to be useful for policy makers. The Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 2017 study used methods to provide highly detailed estimates of global injury burden that meet these criteria.

Methods: In this study, we report and discuss the methods used in GBD 2017 for injury morbidity and mortality burden estimation. In summary, these methods included estimating cause-specific mortality for every cause of injury, and then estimating incidence for every cause of injury. Non-fatal disability for each cause is then calculated based on the probabilities of suffering from different types of bodily injury experienced.

Results: GBD 2017 produced morbidity and mortality estimates for 38 causes of injury. Estimates were produced in terms of incidence, prevalence, years lived with disability, cause-specific mortality, years of life lost and disability-adjusted life-years for a 28-year period for 22 age groups, 195 countries and both sexes.

Conclusions: GBD 2017 demonstrated a complex and sophisticated series of analytical steps using the largest known database of morbidity and mortality data on injuries. GBD 2017 results should be used to help inform injury prevention policy making and resource allocation. We also identify important avenues for improving injury burden estimation in the future.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2019-043531DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7571362PMC
October 2020

Global injury morbidity and mortality from 1990 to 2017: results from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017.

Inj Prev 2020 10 24;26(Supp 1):i96-i114. Epub 2020 Apr 24.

Faculty of Health Sciences - Health Management and Policy, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon.

Background: Past research in population health trends has shown that injuries form a substantial burden of population health loss. Regular updates to injury burden assessments are critical. We report Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 2017 Study estimates on morbidity and mortality for all injuries.

Methods: We reviewed results for injuries from the GBD 2017 study. GBD 2017 measured injury-specific mortality and years of life lost (YLLs) using the Cause of Death Ensemble model. To measure non-fatal injuries, GBD 2017 modelled injury-specific incidence and converted this to prevalence and years lived with disability (YLDs). YLLs and YLDs were summed to calculate disability-adjusted life years (DALYs).

Findings: In 1990, there were 4 260 493 (4 085 700 to 4 396 138) injury deaths, which increased to 4 484 722 (4 332 010 to 4 585 554) deaths in 2017, while age-standardised mortality decreased from 1079 (1073 to 1086) to 738 (730 to 745) per 100 000. In 1990, there were 354 064 302 (95% uncertainty interval: 338 174 876 to 371 610 802) new cases of injury globally, which increased to 520 710 288 (493 430 247 to 547 988 635) new cases in 2017. During this time, age-standardised incidence decreased non-significantly from 6824 (6534 to 7147) to 6763 (6412 to 7118) per 100 000. Between 1990 and 2017, age-standardised DALYs decreased from 4947 (4655 to 5233) per 100 000 to 3267 (3058 to 3505).

Interpretation: Injuries are an important cause of health loss globally, though mortality has declined between 1990 and 2017. Future research in injury burden should focus on prevention in high-burden populations, improving data collection and ensuring access to medical care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2019-043494DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7571366PMC
October 2020

Changes in disease burden in Poland between 1990-2017 in comparison with other Central European countries: A systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017.

PLoS One 2020 2;15(3):e0226766. Epub 2020 Mar 2.

Polish Medical Research Agency, Warsaw, Poland.

Background: Systematic collection of mortality/morbidity data over time is crucial for monitoring trends in population health, developing health policies, assessing the impact of health programs. In Poland, a comprehensive analysis describing trends in disease burden for major conditions has never been published. The Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study (GBD) provides data on the burden of over 300 diseases in 195 countries since 1990. We used the GBD database to undertake an assessment of disease burden in Poland, evaluate changes in population health between 1990-2017, and compare Poland with other Central European (CE) countries.

Methods: The results of GBD 2017 for 1990 and 2017 for Poland and CE were used to assess rates and trends in years of life lost (YLLs), years lived with disability (YLDs), disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). Data came from cause-of-death registration systems, population health surveys, disease registries, hospitalization databases, and the scientific literature. Analytical approaches have been used to adjust for missing data, errors in cause-of-death certification, and differences in data collection methodology. Main estimation strategies were ensemble modelling for mortality and Bayesian meta-regression for disability.

Results: Between 1990-2017, age-standardized YLL rates for all causes declined in Poland by 46.0% (95% UI: 43.7-48.2), YLD rates declined by 4.0% (4.2-4.9), DALY rates by 31.7% (29.2-34.4). For both YLLs and YLDs, greater relative declines were observed for females. There was a large decrease in communicable, maternal, neonatal, and nutritional disease DALYs (48.2%; 46.3-50.4). DALYs due to non-communicable diseases (NCDs) decreased slightly (2.0%; 0.1-4.6). In 2017, Poland performed better than CE as a whole (ranked fourth for YLLs, sixth for YLDs, and fifth for DALYs) and achieved greater reductions in YLLs and DALYs than most CE countries. In 2017 and 1990, the leading cause of YLLs and DALYs in Poland and CE was ischaemic heart disease (IHD), and the leading cause of YLDs was low back pain. In 2017, the top 20 causes of YLLs and YLDs in Poland and CE were the same, although in different order. In Poland, age-standardized DALYs from neonatal causes, other cardiovascular and circulatory diseases, and road injuries declined substantially between 1990-2017, while alcohol use disorders and chronic liver diseases increased. The highest observed-to-expected ratios were seen for alcohol use disorders for YLLs, neonatal sepsis for YLDs, and falls for DALYs (3.21, 2.65, and 2.03, respectively).

Conclusions: There was relatively little geographical variation in premature death and disability in CE in 2017, although some between-country differences existed. Health in Poland has been improving since 1990; in 2017 Poland outperformed CE as a whole for YLLs, YLDs, and DALYs. While the health gap between Poland and Western Europe has diminished, it remains substantial. The shift to NCDs and chronic disability, together with marked between-gender health inequalities, poses a challenge for the Polish health-care system. IHD is still the leading cause of disease burden in Poland, but DALYs from IHD are declining. To further reduce disease burden, an integrated response focused on NCDs and population groups with disproportionally high burden is needed.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0226766PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7051048PMC
May 2020

The burden of unintentional drowning: global, regional and national estimates of mortality from the Global Burden of Disease 2017 Study.

Inj Prev 2020 10 20;26(Supp 1):i83-i95. Epub 2020 Feb 20.

The George Institute for Global Health, New Delhi, India.

Background: Drowning is a leading cause of injury-related mortality globally. Unintentional drowning (International Classification of Diseases (ICD) 10 codes W65-74 and ICD9 E910) is one of the 30 mutually exclusive and collectively exhaustive causes of injury-related mortality in the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study. This study's objective is to describe unintentional drowning using GBD estimates from 1990 to 2017.

Methods: Unintentional drowning from GBD 2017 was estimated for cause-specific mortality and years of life lost (YLLs), age, sex, country, region, Socio-demographic Index (SDI) quintile, and trends from 1990 to 2017. GBD 2017 used standard GBD methods for estimating mortality from drowning.

Results: Globally, unintentional drowning mortality decreased by 44.5% between 1990 and 2017, from 531 956 (uncertainty interval (UI): 484 107 to 572 854) to 295 210 (284 493 to 306 187) deaths. Global age-standardised mortality rates decreased 57.4%, from 9.3 (8.5 to 10.0) in 1990 to 4.0 (3.8 to 4.1) per 100 000 per annum in 2017. Unintentional drowning-associated mortality was generally higher in children, males and in low-SDI to middle-SDI countries. China, India, Pakistan and Bangladesh accounted for 51.2% of all drowning deaths in 2017. Oceania was the region with the highest rate of age-standardised YLLs in 2017, with 45 434 (40 850 to 50 539) YLLs per 100 000 across both sexes.

Conclusions: There has been a decline in global drowning rates. This study shows that the decline was not consistent across countries. The results reinforce the need for continued and improved policy, prevention and research efforts, with a focus on low- and middle-income countries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2019-043484DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7571364PMC
October 2020

Global, Regional, and National Cancer Incidence, Mortality, Years of Life Lost, Years Lived With Disability, and Disability-Adjusted Life-Years for 29 Cancer Groups, 1990 to 2017: A Systematic Analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study.

JAMA Oncol 2019 12;5(12):1749-1768

Department of Family and Community Medicine, Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, Dammam, Saudi Arabia.

Importance: Cancer and other noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) are now widely recognized as a threat to global development. The latest United Nations high-level meeting on NCDs reaffirmed this observation and also highlighted the slow progress in meeting the 2011 Political Declaration on the Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases and the third Sustainable Development Goal. Lack of situational analyses, priority setting, and budgeting have been identified as major obstacles in achieving these goals. All of these have in common that they require information on the local cancer epidemiology. The Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study is uniquely poised to provide these crucial data.

Objective: To describe cancer burden for 29 cancer groups in 195 countries from 1990 through 2017 to provide data needed for cancer control planning.

Evidence Review: We used the GBD study estimation methods to describe cancer incidence, mortality, years lived with disability, years of life lost, and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs). Results are presented at the national level as well as by Socio-demographic Index (SDI), a composite indicator of income, educational attainment, and total fertility rate. We also analyzed the influence of the epidemiological vs the demographic transition on cancer incidence.

Findings: In 2017, there were 24.5 million incident cancer cases worldwide (16.8 million without nonmelanoma skin cancer [NMSC]) and 9.6 million cancer deaths. The majority of cancer DALYs came from years of life lost (97%), and only 3% came from years lived with disability. The odds of developing cancer were the lowest in the low SDI quintile (1 in 7) and the highest in the high SDI quintile (1 in 2) for both sexes. In 2017, the most common incident cancers in men were NMSC (4.3 million incident cases); tracheal, bronchus, and lung (TBL) cancer (1.5 million incident cases); and prostate cancer (1.3 million incident cases). The most common causes of cancer deaths and DALYs for men were TBL cancer (1.3 million deaths and 28.4 million DALYs), liver cancer (572 000 deaths and 15.2 million DALYs), and stomach cancer (542 000 deaths and 12.2 million DALYs). For women in 2017, the most common incident cancers were NMSC (3.3 million incident cases), breast cancer (1.9 million incident cases), and colorectal cancer (819 000 incident cases). The leading causes of cancer deaths and DALYs for women were breast cancer (601 000 deaths and 17.4 million DALYs), TBL cancer (596 000 deaths and 12.6 million DALYs), and colorectal cancer (414 000 deaths and 8.3 million DALYs).

Conclusions And Relevance: The national epidemiological profiles of cancer burden in the GBD study show large heterogeneities, which are a reflection of different exposures to risk factors, economic settings, lifestyles, and access to care and screening. The GBD study can be used by policy makers and other stakeholders to develop and improve national and local cancer control in order to achieve the global targets and improve equity in cancer care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamaoncol.2019.2996DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6777271PMC
December 2019

Antithrombotic treatment tailoring and risk score evaluation in elderly patients diagnosed with an acute coronary syndrome.

J Geriatr Cardiol 2017 Jul;14(7):442-456

Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.

Age is an important prognostic factor in the outcome of acute coronary syndromes (ACS). A substantial percentage of patients who experience ACS is more than 75 years old, and they represent the fastest-growing segment of the population treated in this setting. These patients present different patterns of responses to pharmacotherapy, namely, a higher ischemic and bleeding risk than do patients under 75 years of age. Our aim was to identify whether the currently available ACS ischemic and bleeding risk scores, which has been validated for the general population, may also apply to the elderly population. The second aim was to determine whether the elderly benefit more from a specific pharmacological regimen, keeping in mind the numerous molecules of antiplatelet and antithrombotic drugs, all validated in the general population. We concluded that the GRACE (Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events) risk score has been extensively validated in the elderly. However, the CRUSADE (Can Rapid risk stratification of Unstable angina patients Suppress ADverse outcomes with Early implementation of the ACC/AHA Guidelines) bleeding score has a moderate correlation with outcomes in the elderly. Until now, there have not been head-to-head scores that quantify the ischemic versus hemorrhagic risk or scores that use the same end point and timeline (e.g., ischemic death rate versus bleeding death rate at one month). We also recommend that the frailty score be considered or integrated into the current existing scores to better quantify the overall patient risk. With regard to medical treatment, based on the subgroup analysis, we identified the drugs that have the least adverse effects in the elderly while maintaining optimal efficacy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.11909/j.issn.1671-5411.2017.07.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5545187PMC
July 2017

Oral sirolimus: A possible treatment for refractory angina pectoris in the elderly.

Int J Cardiol 2016 Nov 2;222:1097-1104. Epub 2016 Aug 2.

Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome, Italy. Electronic address:

Refractory angina pectoris (RAP) is a clinical problem, frequently encountered in the elderly, associated with high health-care costs. Until recently, the goal of RAP treatment aimed at improving the quality of life (QoL) because it was thought that mortality rates were not different between stable angina pectoris and RAP. Our purpose was at determining whether any mortality rate difference exists and whether any novel therapeutical solution might be translated into clinical practice. We therefore performed a literature review to assess current optimal treatment of RAP patients, including all studies involving the use of oral sirolimus and stents, although no consistent evidence was found for any specific treatment to improve survival, apart from minor QoL amelioration. A large mortality difference was seen between RAP and stable angina pectoris. On the other hand, therapeutic approaches to RAP patients showed frequent complications and several contraindications, depending on the procedure. We propose to inhibit instead of stimulating angiogenesis, by giving oral sirolimus, an immunosuppressive drug, thereby decreasing the atherosclerotic process and its evolution. Sirolimus was shown to decrease left ventricular mass (thus indirectly decreasing myocardial oxygen needs and consumption). It might stop and, in some cases, even enable regression of plaque progression. Sirolimus side effects are mild to moderate and wash-out rapidly at treatment discontinuation. Compared with current therapies sirolimus treatment is more health-care cost efficient. It should be important to design a trial in RAP patients powered to reduce mortality and QoL increase.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2016.07.206DOI Listing
November 2016

Viewpoint: the ENIGMAS trial - when should we treat patients with moderate aortic stenosis?

Echocardiography 2013 May 12;30(5):599-615. Epub 2012 Dec 12.

Cardiology Department, "Bagdasar Arseni" Emergency Hospital, Bucharest, Romania.

Aortic stenosis (AS) is the most frequent valvular heart disease encountered in our daily practice. Although there are clear guidelines for severe AS management, cardiologists often have few treatment options for patients with moderate AS; however, there is higher mortality in this patient subgroup versus an age-matched population. The authors reviewed all of the studies on moderate AS, summarized the factors that increase disease progression and discussed an ideal trial design to prospectively evaluate AS progression factors using modern cardiology tools such as strain and magnetic resonance imaging.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/echo.12080DOI Listing
May 2013
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