Publications by authors named "Carolyn M Doerning"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Old World monkeys need their new world reviewed.

Lab Anim (NY) 2020 11;49(11):298

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Division of Veterinary Services, Cincinnati, OH, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41684-020-00663-1DOI Listing
November 2020

Assessment of Mouse Handling Techniques During Cage Changing.

J Am Assoc Lab Anim Sci 2019 11 23;58(6):767-773. Epub 2019 Oct 23.

Refinement Enrichment Advancements Laboratory, Unit for Laboratory Animal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Mouse handling during cage changing and health evaluation has traditionally been performed by using forceps. This method was adopted as a biosecurity measure but can adversely affect employee ergonomics and rodent behavior. In this study, we evaluated alternative methods of rodent handling and their potential implications for efficiency, biosecurity, and animal welfare. Study groups included plastic cups, gloved hands, 2 methods of tunnel handling, and forceps. Evaluations included speed of cage change, ATP-based assessment of sanitization, and retrospective analysis of colony health and breeding data. The time to change 14 cages was significantly faster at each time point for the gloved hands and forceps groups as compared with the other methods. Overall speed did not increase significantly with each subsequent study week for any group. ATP levels after sanitization with hydrogen peroxide-peracetic acid mixture differed significantly between gloves and forceps. When ATP level was evaluated on a per-cm² basis, no significant difference between gloves and forceps was detected. Although tunnel and cup handling both increased the time for cage-changing, the tunnel served as both an indirect handling method and a shelter when left within the cage. Retrospective analysis revealed that breeding performance and colony health were similar among groups. Although efficiency is a concern for large-scale implementation of novel handling methods, the tunnel method may prove beneficial for sensitive strains or studies requiring indirect handling. In addition, using gloved hands to directly handle mice during cage changing is efficient and avoids the ergonomic strain associated with forceps. Precautions should be taken when handling mice with gloves, given that the increased contact area carries an increased load of organic debris. Changing gloves between rack sides or before proceeding to the animals belonging to a different investigator minimizes the potential for cross-contamination.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.30802/AALAS-JAALAS-19-000015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6926398PMC
November 2019

Intramuscular Administration of Alfaxalone Alone and in Combination for Sedation and Anesthesia of Rabbits ().

J Am Assoc Lab Anim Sci 2019 03 28;58(2):216-222. Epub 2019 Feb 28.

Unit for Laboratory Animal Medicine; University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.

This study compared alfaxalone, alone and in combination with other medications, for sedative and anesthetic properties after intramuscular administration in New Zealand white rabbits. In the main portion of the study, 6 female rabbits were assigned to 5 treatment regimens in a blinded crossover design. Alfaxalone (6 mg/kg IM) was administered alone and in combination with each of the following: 0.3 mg/kg butorphanol; 1 mg/kg midazolam; 0.2 mg/kg dexmedetomidine; and both 0.3 mg/kg butorphanol and 0.2 mg/kg dexmedetomidine. An additional 6 rabbits received 0.2 mg/kg dexmedetomidine for comparison. The median time to onset of recumbency ranged from 2.0 to 5.5 min, with times significantly shorter for animals that received alfaxalone with either midazolam or dexmedetomidine than for those given dexmedetomidine only. Duration of sedation (mean ± 1 SD) was: alfaxalone only, 40 ± 7.3 min; alfaxalone with butorphanol, 47.8 ± 9.9 min; alfaxalone with midazolam, 65.2 ± 6.5 min; alfaxalone with dexmedetomidine, 157.5 ± 22.4 min; alfaxalone with butorphanol and dexmedetomidine, 157.7 ± 22.3 min, and dexmedetomidine only, 93.7 ± 11.9 min. Response to noxious stimuli was absent in 2 of the rabbits given dexmedetomidine only, 4 of those given alfaxalone with dexmedetomidine, and all 6 of the animals dosed with alfaxalone, butorphanol, and dexmedetomidine; this last group displayed the longest absence of a toe-pinch response (57 ± 3 min).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.30802/AALAS-JAALAS-18-000078DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6433347PMC
March 2019

Scientific merit merits investigation.

Lab Anim (NY) 2018 09;47(9):220

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41684-018-0132-6DOI Listing
September 2018

Effects of subcutaneous alfaxalone alone and in combination with dexmedetomidine and buprenorphine in guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus).

Vet Anaesth Analg 2018 Sep 2;45(5):658-666. Epub 2018 Jul 2.

Unit for Laboratory Animal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. Electronic address:

Objective: To characterize alfaxalone administered subcutaneously (SC) in guinea pigs, both alone and in combination with dexmedetomidine and buprenorphine.

Study Design: Prospective, blinded, crossover study.

Animals: A total of 15 healthy female guinea pigs weighing 400-600 g.

Methods: Alfaxalone (10, 20 and 40 mg kg) was administered SC to three guinea pigs as a pilot dose-finding study. Alfaxalone (20 mg kg; A) was selected for comparison against combination protocols of alfaxalone (15 and 20 mg kg) with dexmedetomidine (0.25 mg kg) and buprenorphine (0.05 mg kg; ADB, ADB). Each protocol was randomly administered to 12 guinea pigs separated by ≥7 days. Time and quality of induction and recovery, heart rate, respiratory rate, peripheral hemoglobin oxygen saturation, rectal temperature, pedal withdrawal reflex and adverse effects were recorded.

Results: The median time to induction for A, ADB and ADB was 6.8-8.0 minutes with no significant difference between treatments. Mean duration of recumbency for A was 73.6 ± 19.6 minutes. Recumbency duration for ADB and ADB extended to 90 minutes, at which time dexmedetomidine was antagonized using atipamezole (0.025 mg kg SC). Physiological variables were within normal limits with the exception of one animal that died 45 minutes following treatment with ADB. Pedal withdrawal reflex remained intact with all treatments. Minor side effects such as twitching or bruxism occurred sporadically with treatment A but not with ADB and ADB.

Conclusions And Clinical Relevance: SC alfaxalone produced uncomplicated sedation that may be recommended for nonpainful procedures that do not require complete immobility. The addition of dexmedetomidine and buprenorphine increased the duration of sedation and immobility, but did not result in general anesthesia. This combination sedation protocol may be useful for nonpainful procedures requiring extended immobility.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaa.2018.06.004DOI Listing
September 2018

Refinement of Perioperative Feeding in a Mouse Model of Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy.

J Am Assoc Lab Anim Sci 2018 05 24;57(3):295-301. Epub 2018 Apr 24.

Unit for Laboratory Animal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Provision of liquid enteral nutrition (LEN) during the perioperative period is standard practice for rodents undergoing bariatric surgery, yet these diets are associated with several challenges, including coagulation of the liquid diet within the delivery system and decreased postoperative consumption. We investigated the use of a commercially available high-calorie dietary gel supplement (DG) as an alternative food source for mice during the perioperative period. C57BL/6J male mice were fed high-fat diet for 8 to 10 wk prior to surgery. The study groups were: vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG) +DG, VSG+LEN, sham surgery+DG, and sham+LEN. Food and water intakes, body weight, and body fat composition was monitored throughout the study. Mice that received DG lost significantly more weight preoperatively than those fed LEN. However, during the postoperative period, body weight, body fat composition, and water and caloric intake were similar among all experimental diet groups. Three mice in the VSG+LEN group were euthanized due to clinical illness during the course of the study. In summary, feeding a high-calorie DG to mice undergoing VSG surgery is a viable alternative to LEN, given that DG does not significantly affect the surgical model of weight loss or result in adverse clinical outcomes. We recommend additional metabolic characterization of DG supplementation to ensure that this novel diet does not confound specific research goals in the murine VSG model.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.30802/AALAS-JAALAS-17-000162DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5966239PMC
May 2018