Publications by authors named "Caroline Télion"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Preoperative risk factors for intra-operative bleeding in pediatric liver transplantation.

Pediatr Transplant 2016 Dec 29;20(8):1065-1071. Epub 2016 Sep 29.

Pediatric surgery unit, Hôpital Necker enfants malades, Paris, France.

This study analyzes the preoperative risk factors for intra-operative bleeding in our recent series of pediatric LTs. Between November 2009 and November 2014, 84 consecutive isolated pediatric LTs were performed in 81 children. Potential preoperative predictive factors for bleeding, amount of intra-operative transfusions, postoperative course, and outcome were recorded. Cutoff point for intra-operative HBL was defined as intra-operative RBC transfusions ≥1 TBV. Twenty-six patients (31%) had intra-operative HBL. One-year patient survival after LT was 66.7% (CI 95%=[50.2-88.5]) in HBL patients and 83.8% (CI 95%=[74.6-94.1]) in the others (P=.054). Among 13 potential preoperative risk factors, three of them were identified as independent predictors of high intra-operative bleeding: abdominal surgical procedure(s) prior to LT, factor V level ≤30% before transplantation, and ex situ parenchymal transsection of the liver graft. Based on these findings, we propose a simple score to predict the individual hemorrhagic risk related to each patient and graft association. This score may help to better anticipate intra-operative bleeding and improve patient's management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/petr.12794DOI Listing
December 2016

Age dependency for coagulation parameters in paediatric populations. Results of a multicentre study aimed at defining the age-specific reference ranges.

Thromb Haemost 2016 07 17;116(1):9-16. Epub 2016 Mar 17.

Dr. Pierre Toulon, CHU Nice, Hôpital Pasteur, Service d'Hématologie Biologique, 30, avenue de la Voie Romaine, CS 51069, F-06001 Nice Cedex 1, France, Tel.: + 33 4 92 03 87 09, Fax: + 33 4 92 03 85 95, E-mail:

Understanding of developmental haemostasis is critical to ensure optimal prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of haemorrhagic and thrombotic diseases in children. As coagulation test results are known to be dependent on the reagents/analysers used, it is recommended for each laboratory to define the age-dependent reference ranges by using its own technical condition. That study was carried out in seven centers to establish age-specific reference ranges using the same reagents and analyser. Plasma samples were obtained from 1437 paediatric patients from the following age groups: 15 days-4 weeks (n=36), 1-5 months (n=320), 6-12 months (n=176), 1-5 years (n=507), 6-10 years (n=132) and 11-17 years (n=262). Indication of coagulation testing was pre-operative screening for non-acute diseases in most cases. PT values were similar in the different age groups to those in adults, whereas longer aPTTs were demonstrated in the younger children. Plasma levels of all clotting factors, except for FV, were significantly decreased (p<0.0001) in the youngest children, adult values being usually reached before the end of the first year. The same applied to antithrombin, protein C/S, and plasminogen. In contrast, FVIII and VWF levels were elevated in the youngest children and returned to adult values within six months. The same applied to D-dimer levels, which were found elevated, particularly until six months of life, until puberty. These data suggest that most coagulation test results are highly dependent on age, mainly during the first year of life, and that age-specific reference ranges must be used to ensure proper evaluation of coagulation in children.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1160/TH15-12-0964DOI Listing
July 2016

Primordial Influence of Post-operative Compliance on Weight Loss After Adolescent Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding.

Obes Surg 2016 Jan;26(1):98-104

AP-HP, Hôpital Necker-Enfants Malades, Service de Chirurgie Pédiatrique Viscérale, 149 rue de Sevres, 75015, Paris, France.

Background: Accumulating evidence suggests that the benefits seen in adult bariatric surgery can be reproduced in adolescents. In contrast with North America, bariatric surgery in adolescents is still not well accepted in Europe and indications and protocols have still to be formulated.

Methods: This prospective study tested the gastric banding procedure in 49 patients operated in a single French institution since 2008. The mean age at surgery was 16.2 ± 0.9 years with a weight of 118.8 ± 22.3 kg and body mass index of 42.5 ± 5.9 kg/m(2).

Results: At 6, 12 and 24 months after surgery, weight was 103.7 ± 20.8 kg, 98.7 ± 21 kg and 93.6 ± 19.3 kg, respectively (p < 0.001), corresponding to excess weight loss (EWL) of 31.6 ± 17.2 %, 41.8 ± 21.4 % and 59.1 ± 24.9 % (p < 0.001), respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that the number of consultations per year was the only variable significantly associated to weight loss. Metabolic disorders were corrected, with a decreased prevalence of insulin resistance from 100 to 17 % and normalisation of homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) at 24 months (2.09 ± 0.95). Band-related complications were five slippages, one psychological intolerance and two ports repositioning. Six patients (12 %) had the device explanted. The death of a patient was an exceptionally severe adverse event.

Conclusion: Given frequent follow-up support by a multidisciplinary team, laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) surgery in adolescent results in sustained weight loss. However, even exceptional, potentially serious complications are possible and long-term follow-up is needed to evaluate the risk/benefit ratio at 5 or 10 years after LAGB surgery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11695-015-1725-4DOI Listing
January 2016

Comparison of intravenous and intraosseous access by pre-hospital medical emergency personnel with and without CBRN protective equipment.

Resuscitation 2010 Jan 24;81(1):65-8. Epub 2009 Oct 24.

SAMU de Paris, Département d'Anesthésie-Réanimation-SAMU, Hôpital Necker - Enfants Malades, 149 rue de Sèvres, 75730 Paris Cedex 15, Université Paris Descartes - Paris V, France.

Introduction: Rapid intravascular access is a prerequisite component of emergency care and resuscitation. Peripheral intravenous (IV) access is the first-choice for most of the medical or trauma patients, but may be delayed in emergency conditions because of various difficulties. Elsewhere, intraosseous (IO) access may now be easily performed with a new semi-automatic battery-powered IO-insertion device (EZ-IO. The aim of this study was to compare the overall time to establish IO infusion with the EZ-IO device and the equivalent time for peripheral IV infusion, performed by emergency personnel in standard (No-CBRN) and in chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) protective equipment.

Methods: Nine nurses and 16 physicians randomly performed 4 procedures on a training manikin: IV and IO access under No-CBRN conditions and IV and IO under CBRN conditions. The time for each infusion attempt included all the steps essential for a simulated safe clinical use of infusion.

Results: Under No-CBRN conditions, the time to establish IO infusion was shorter than the equivalent IV time (50+/-9 vs 70+/-30s). Similarly, under CBRN conditions, the time for IO infusion was shorter than for IV infusion (65+/-17 vs 104+/-30s). The mean time saved by IO infusion over IV infusion was respectively 20+/-24s (P<0.001) and 39+/-20s (P<0.001) under No-CBRN and CBRN conditions.

Conclusion: The time to establish IO infusion was significantly shorter than that for peripheral IV infusion, under both No-CBRN and CBRN conditions. Further clinical studies are required to confirm that IO access would effectively save time over IV access in real pre-hospital emergency settings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.resuscitation.2009.09.011DOI Listing
January 2010

[Automated external defibrillation: new French guidelines and their application].

Presse Med 2008 Jun 28;37(6 Pt 2):1073-8. Epub 2008 Apr 28.

Service d'anesthésie réanimation et SAMU de Paris, Hôpital Necker Enfants malades F-75015 Paris, France.

Unexpected cardiac arrest, that is, sudden death in adults, accounts for nearly 50 000 deaths each year in France. Automated external defibrillation performed in public places improves victims' survival. Automated external defibrillators can be made available in 2 different ways: for "self-service" by members of the public, or through a designated staff person. The effectiveness of the program relies on an appropriate choice of location for these defibrillators. Extensive training of the public is not mandatory, but quick lessons in how to use the material and of cardiopulmonary resuscitation are necessary. They should be offered to the population as short free training lessons and as information campaigns. This minimal training covers 3 actions: (1) call for help from the emergency medical services, (2) perform chest compression (external cardiac massage), (3) plug in the defibrillator and follow the instructions on it until help arrives. Programs that make defibrillators available must organize maintenance to verify that they are in good operating condition at regular intervals and must assess the quality of their use, by collecting data on the cases treated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lpm.2008.02.008DOI Listing
June 2008

Multiple casualty incidents: the prehospital role of the anesthesiologist in Europe.

Anesthesiol Clin 2007 Mar;25(1):179-88, xi

Department of Anesthesiology and SAMU de Paris, Hôpital Necker - Enfants Malades, 149 rue de Sèvres, 75743 Paris CEDEX 15, France.

The recent increase in incidents involving mass casualties has emphasized the need for a planned and coordinated prehospital emergency medical response, with medical teams on-site to provide advanced trauma life support. The special skills of the anesthesiologist make his/her contribution to prehospital emergency care particularly valuable. The United Kingdom's emergency medical services system is operated paramedically like that in the United States, and is based on rapid evacuation of casualties to hospital emergency medical facilities. In contrast, the French approach is based on the use of its emergency care system SAMU, where both structured dispatching and on-site medical care is provided by physicians, including anesthesiologists. In this article, the lessons learned from multiple casualty incidents in Europe during the past 2 decades are considered from the standpoint of the anesthesiologist.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.atc.2006.11.006DOI Listing
March 2007

Terrorism in France.

Prehosp Disaster Med 2003 Apr-Jun;18(2):92-9

Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, SAMU de Paris, Hôpital Necker, Paris, France.

France has experienced two waves of major terrorist bombings since 1980. In the first wave (1985-1986), eight bombings occurred in Paris, killing 13 and injuring 281. In the second wave (1995-1996), six bombings occurred in Paris and Lyon, killing 10 and injuring 262. Based on lessons learned during these events, France has developed and improved a sophisticated national system for prehospital emergency response to conventional terrorist attacks based on its national emergency medical services (EMS) system, Service d'Aide Medicale Urgente (SAMU). According to the national plan for the emergency medical response to mass-casualty events (White Plan), the major phases of EMS response are: (1) alert; (2) search and rescue; (3) triage of victims and provision of critical care to first priority victims; (4) regulated dispatch of victims to hospitals; and (5) psychological assistance. Following the 1995 Tokyo subway sarin attack, a national plan for the emergency response to chemical and biological events (PIRATOX) was implemented. In 2002, the Ministries of Health and the Interior collaborated to produce a comprehensive national plan (BIOTOX) for the emergency response to chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear events. Key aspects of BIOTOX are the prehospital provision of specialized advance life support for toxic injuries and the protection of responders in contaminated environments. BIOTOX was successfully used during the 2003 Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) outbreak in France.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s1049023x00000820DOI Listing
May 2004