Publications by authors named "Caroline R Borja-Oliveira"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Beneficial effect of crotamine in the treatment of myasthenic rats.

Muscle Nerve 2013 Apr 4;47(4):591-3. Epub 2013 Mar 4.

Departamento de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, São Paolo, Brazil.

Introduction: Crotamine is a basic, low-molecular-weight peptide that, at low concentrations, improves neurotransmission in isolated neuromuscular preparations by modulating sodium channels. In this study, we compared the effects of crotamine and neostigmine on neuromuscular transmission in myasthenic rats.

Methods: We used a conventional electromyographic technique in in-situ neuromuscular preparations and a 4-week treadmill program.

Results: During the in-situ electromyographic recording, neostigmine (17 μg/kg) caused short-term facilitation, whereas crotamine induced progressive and sustained twitch-tension enhancement during 140 min of recording (50 ± 5%, P < 0.05). On the treadmill evaluation, rats showed significant improvement in exercise tolerance, characterized by a decrease in the number of fatigue episodes after 2 weeks of a single-dose treatment with crotamine.

Conclusions: These results indicate that crotamine is more efficient than neostigmine for enhancing muscular performance in myasthenic rats, possibly by improving the safety factor of neuromuscular transmission.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mus.23714DOI Listing
April 2013

Neuromuscular and phospholipase activities of venoms from three subspecies of Bothrops neuwiedi (B. n. goyazensis, B. n. paranaensis and B. n. diporus).

Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 2007 Sep 6;148(1):142-9. Epub 2007 Apr 6.

Departamento de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, CP 6111, 13083-970, Campinas, SP, Brazil.

The Bothrops neuwiedi (Neuwied's lancehead) species complex consists of a variety of subspecies with a wide distribution in South America. In this work, we compared the neuromuscular blockade caused by venoms from three subspecies (B. n. goyazensis, B. n. paranaensis and B. n. diporus) of this complex using chick biventer cervicis (BC) and mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm (PND) preparations and investigated their phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activities and electrophoretic profiles. The order of potency of PLA2 activity was B. n. diporus>B. n. paranaensis>B. n. goyazensis. In BC preparations, B. n. goyazensis venom (50 microg/mL) was significantly (p<0.05) more active than B. n. paranaensis and B. n. diporus venoms, which did not produce a significant blockade at this time interval; after 120 min, B. n. goyazensis, B. n. paranaensis and B. n. diporus venoms (100 microg/mL) produced blockades of 57.4+/-5%, 30+/-3% and 17.4+/-7% (n=3-6 each), respectively. The three venoms inhibited contractures in response to ACh, indicating interference with postsynaptic neurotransmission. Only B. n. goyazensis and B. n. paranaensis venoms caused a long-lasting, concentration-dependent muscle contracture prior to blockade. In PND preparations, all of the venoms blocked the twitch-tension responses within 45-100 min, indicating that these preparations were more sensitive than avian preparations. There was a correlation between PLA2 activity and the time for 50% blockade in PND but not in BC preparations. SDS-PAGE showed quantitative rather than qualitative differences among the venoms. These results indicate that the venoms of the three subspecies had similar profiles of neuromuscular activity, although the relationship with PLA2 activity varied with the preparation used.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpa.2007.03.030DOI Listing
September 2007

Biological and enzymatic activities of Micrurus sp. (Coral) snake venoms.

Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 2005 Jan;140(1):125-34

Departamento de Física e Química, FCFRP, USP, Ribeirão Preto-SP, Brazil.

The venoms of Micrurus lemniscatus carvalhoi, Micrurus frontalis frontalis, Micrurus surinamensis surinamensis and Micrurus nigrocinctus nigrocinctus were assayed for biological activities. Although showing similar liposome disrupting and myotoxic activities, M. frontalis frontalis and M. nigrocinctus nigrocinctus displayed higher anticoagulant and phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activities. The latter induced a higher edema response within 30 min. Both venoms were the most toxic as well. In the isolated chick biventer cervicis preparation, M. lemniscatus carvalhoi venom blocked the indirectly elicited twitch-tension response (85+/-0.6% inhibition after a 15 min incubation at 5 microg of venom/mL) and the response to acetylcholine (ACh; 55 or 110 microM), without affecting the response to KCl (13.4 mM). In mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparation, the venom (5 microg/mL) produced a complete inhibition of the indirectly elicited contractile response after 50 min incubation and did not affect the contractions elicited by direct stimulation. M. lemniscatus carvalhoi inhibited 3H-L-glutamate uptake in brain synaptosomes in a Ca2+-, but not time, dependent manner. The replacement of Ca2+ by Sr2+ and ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether) (EGTA), or alkylation of the venom with p-bromophenacyl bromide (BPB), inhibited 3H-L-glutamate uptake. M. lemniscatus carvalhoi venom cross-reacted with postsynaptic alpha-neurotoxins short-chain (antineurotoxin-II) and long-chain (antibungarotoxin) antibodies. It also cross-reacted with antimyotoxic PLA2 antibodies from M. nigrocinctus nigrocinctus (antinigroxin). Our results point to the need of catalytic activity for these venoms to exert their neurotoxic activity efficiently and to their components as attractive tools for the study of molecular targets on cell membranes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpb.2004.11.012DOI Listing
January 2005

Pharmacological evidence for a presynaptic action of venoms from Bothrops insularis (jararaca ilhoa) and Bothrops neuwiedi (jararaca pintada).

Toxicon 2004 May;43(6):633-8

Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), P.O. Box 6111, Campinas, SP 13081-970, Brazil.

Whereas the presynaptic action of Crotalus durissus terrificus venom is well-established, Bothrops venoms have historically been considered to have only postsynaptic and muscular effects. However, some studies have also suggested a presynaptic action for these venoms. In this work, we used chick biventer cervicis preparations to compare the presynaptic actions of two Bothrops venoms (B. insularis and B. neuwiedi) with that of C. d. terrificus venom. At 10 microg/ml, all venoms produced irreversible blockade of the twitch tension responses, with no reduction in acetylcholine (ACh)-induced contractures and only a slight decrease in potassium induced-contractures. The times (in min) required to produce 50% neuromuscular blockade (C. d. terrificus: 16.3+/-0.7, n = 8; B. insularis: 30.0+/-1.9, n = 5; B. neuwiedi: 42.0+/-2.0, n = 8; mean +/- SEM) were significantly different among the venoms (p < 0.01). Lowering the temperature at which the experiments were done (from 37 to 24 degrees C) prevented neuromuscular blockade by the three venoms, indicating that enzyme activity may be involved in this response. At concentrations capable of causing complete neuromuscular blockade, creatine kinase release remained close to levels seen in control preparations incubated with Krebs solution alone (500-1200 IU/l). Commercial crotalic antivenom, but not bothropic antivenom, protected against the neuromuscular blockade caused by B. insularis and B. neuwiedi venoms. These observations indicate that bothropic venoms may contain components which act presynaptically in a manner similar to C. d. terrificus venom, and that at low venom concentrations a direct action on skeletal muscle does not contribute to this presynaptic neurotoxicity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxicon.2003.10.027DOI Listing
May 2004