Publications by authors named "Carolina Barroetaveña"

7 Publications

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Traditional mycological knowledge and processes of change in Mapuche communities from Patagonia, Argentina: A study on wild edible fungi in Nothofagaceae forests.

Mycologia 2020 Jan-Feb;112(1):9-23. Epub 2019 Dec 18.

Universidad Nacional de la Patagonia San Juan Bosco, Ruta 259, Km 16, Esquel (9200), Argentina.

Practices, perceptions, beliefs, and other forms of relationships between rural inhabitants and fungi have scarcely been studied in Patagonia. In this work, we analyze species richness, cultural importance, and modes of use of wild edible fungi in five Mapuche communities in northwest Patagonia of Argentina. Through an ethnobiological approach, we carried out semistructured interviews, walks in forests, and participant observations. Data were analyzed qualitative and quantitatively. Community members collected 17 species in environments with different degrees of human disturbance that they consumed fresh in situ, after some processing or stored for later consumption or trade. Indigenous morels such as aff. . aff. , and an unidentified species of had the greatest cultural importance at the regional level, followed by the exotic and the native . Most of these species were frequently mentioned as having commercial value, continuity of use over time, and outstanding organoleptic properties. The remaining species currently have occasional use. The differential use of edible fungi, practices, transferences, and resignifications, as well as new technologies for storage, were analyzed. Regional knowledge about fungi reflects important features of Mapuche tradition but also the process of change in responding to complex and dynamic socioeconomic and ecological contexts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00275514.2019.1680219DOI Listing
September 2020

Diversity of exotic ectomycorrhizal from pine plantations in Patagonia.

Mycologia 2019 Sep-Oct;111(5):782-792. Epub 2019 Sep 23.

Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Argentina.

We present an account of introduced from plantings of exotic pine plantations in Argentine Patagonia. Nuc rDNA internal transcribed spacer ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 (ITS) and nuc 28S rDNA (28S) sequences were used to identify specimens from Argentina and examine their relationships with geographically different species. Based on phylogenetic analyses, we confirm that four species of occur in pine plantations across Patagonia. Several collections from plantations across different provinces cluster with , a species within . subg. . The majority of Patagonian , however, form three different lineages in . subg. . The first of these, sensu Trappe, includes numerous collections from , and stands of North American affiliation. The second, sensu Martin and Garcia from plantations, clusters in clade IIIa of the complex, which also includes the holotype collection of from the Czech Republic. The third species in . subg. , and fourth species overall from Patagonia, is from plantations. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of numerous samples failed to produce an amplicon indicative of either Japanese or New Zealand shoro.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00275514.2019.1647395DOI Listing
March 2020

The enigmatic Cortinarius magellanicus complex occurring in Nothofagaceae forests of the Southern Hemisphere.

Fungal Biol 2018 11 8;122(11):1077-1097. Epub 2018 Sep 8.

University Innsbruck, Institute of Microbiology, Technikerstr. 25, 6020, Innsbruck, Austria. Electronic address:

Cortinarius magellanicus Speg. is an edible, ectomycorrhizal fungus, widely distributed in Argentina, Chile and New Zealand. However, earlier studies already indicated that the epithet 'magellanicus' might have been applied in a wide sense, thus circumscribing several species. A neotype was designated by Moser and Horak (1975) due Spegazzini's type was lost. Argentinian Nothofagaceae forests' samples, from autumn of 2017, morphologically recognized as C. magellanicus were used for a phylogenetic analysis, including sequences from type material and closely related species. Our results showed that C. magellanicus represents a complex of species, with at least three phylogenetic lineages, each with strong regionalism and distinct host associations. Cortinarius magellanicus s. str. is restricted to Patagonia of Argentina and Chile. The misidentified reports from New Zealand and Australia represent distinct and different lineages. In the present contribution, the re-description of C. magellanicus is based on neotype material and two new species are proposed. Cortinarius vitreopileatus var. similissimus is described as variety from New Zealand resembling C. magellanicus, however without close phylogenetic relationship to it. The taxonomic delimitation for C. magellanicus species complex is of high relevance due to the abundance of these fungi and their ectomycorrhizal role in Nothofagaceae forests in Gondwanian region.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.funbio.2018.08.009DOI Listing
November 2018

Chemical and Antioxidant Properties of Wild Edible Mushrooms from Native Nothofagus spp. Forest, Argentina.

Molecules 2016 Sep 8;21(9). Epub 2016 Sep 8.

MountainResearch Centre (CIMO), ESA, Polytechnic Institute of Bragança, Campus de Santa Apolónia, 1172, 5300-253 Bragança, Portugal.

This study addresses issues regarding chemical and bioactive properties of nine wild edible mushrooms from native Nothofagus forest from Patagonia, Argentina. Macronutrients, sugars, fatty acids, tocopherols, organic acids, phenolic compounds and antioxidant properties were determined. Protein was found in high levels and varied between 3.35 g/100 g dw in Cyttaria hariotii and 22.29 g/100 g dw in Lepista nuda. All of them presented mannitol and trehalose as main sugars. Mannitol was significantly higher in Ramaria patagonica, although absent in Fistulina endoxantha, whereas trehalose predominated in Aleurodiscus vitellinus, Hydropus dusenii, Cortinarius magellanicus, C. hariotii, Grifola gargal and L. nuda, ranging from 1.15 to 10.26 g/100 g dw; it was absent in R. patagonica. The major fatty acid found was linoleic acid, followed by oleic acid and palmitic acid. All species presented oxalic and fumaric acids, while some also had malic, quinic and citric acids. Tocopherols composition was variable. Cortinarius magellanicus presented significantly higher contents of both α-tocopherol and β-tocopherol. R. patagonica presented the best results in all the antioxidant activity assays (EC50 values ≤ 1 mg/mL) and the highest content of phenolic compounds presenting gallic, p-hydroxybenzoic, p-coumaric and cinnamic acids. This study constitutes the first report on chemical composition and nutritional value of most of these edible mushroom species. Furthermore, it provides important information necessary to characterize and define the use of these species as gastronomic delicacies, functional foods and sources of bioactive compounds.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules21091201DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6274418PMC
September 2016

New species of Tomentella (Thelephorales) from the Patagonian Andes forests.

Mycologia 2016 Jul-Aug;108(4):780-90. Epub 2016 Apr 18.

Centro de Investigación y Extensión Forestal Andino Patagónico (CIEFAP), C.C. 14, Ruta 259 km 14.6, Esquel, Chubut, 9200 Argentina, and Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), ArgentinaUniversidad Nacional de la Patagonia S.J. Bosco, Facultad de Ingeniería, Sede Esquel, Ruta 259 km 14.6, Esquel, Chubut, 9200 Argentina.

The genus Tomentella forms abundant ectomycorrhizae in coniferous and deciduous forests worldwide. Molecular identification of root tips suggests undescribed species in the Nothofagus forests of Patagonia, Argentina. Tomentella tenuissima, T. pulvinulata and T. patagonica are described here as new to science based on morphological and molecular analyses. Their host range is addressed using available soil sequences. The identity of previous records of T. galzinii and T. radiosa are discussed with morphological and molecular evidence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3852/15-244DOI Listing
January 2018

The phylogenetic position of poroid Hymenochaetaceae (Hymenochaetales, Basidiomycota) from Patagonia, Argentina.

Mycologia 2015 Jul-Aug;107(4):754-67. Epub 2015 Apr 24.

Centro Forestal CIEFAP-CONICET, CC14, 9200 Esquel, Chubut, Argentina and Universidad Nacional de la Patagonia SJ Bosco, Ruta 259 km 16.2, 9200 Esquel, Chubut, Argentina.

Six poroid Hymenochaetaceae from Patagonia, Argentina, were studied phylogenetically with nuc rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and partial 28S rDNA sequences, together with morphological data. Two new genera and a new species are introduced as well as two new combinations proposed. Arambarria destruens gen. et sp. nov. is proposed for a taxon fruiting on fallen or standing, dead Diostea juncea and Lomatia hirsuta and previously recorded erroneously as Inocutis jamaicensis; it is distinguished by annual, effused to effused-reflexed basidiomes forming pilei, a monomitic hyphal system, thick-walled and yellowish basidiospores (brownish chestnut in potassium hydroxide solution), lack of a granular core in the context and lack of setoid elements. Nothophellinus gen. nov. is proposed to accommodate Phellinus andinopatagonicus, the main white wood-rotting polypore of standing Nothofagus pumilio and also an important wood-decayer of other Nothofagus species from southern Argentina and Chile. It is morphologically similar to Phellopilus (type species P. nigrolimitatus) but differs by lacking setae. The new combinations Pseudoinonotus crustosus and Phellinopsis andina are proposed for Inonotus crustosus and Phellinus andinus, respectively. Phellinus livescens, which decays the sapwood of several standing Nothofagus species, is closely related to Phellinus uncisetus, a Neotropical species related to Fomitiporia; for the time being P. livescens is retained in Phellinus sensu lato. An unidentified taxon responsible for a white heart-rot in living Austrocedrus chilensis grouped with Phellinus caryophyllii and Fulvifomes inermis, but its generic affinities remain ambiguous. Transmission electron microscopy studies confirm this unidentified taxon has an imperforate parenthesome, which is typical of the Hymenochaetaceae.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3852/14-170DOI Listing
September 2015

Phylogenetic diversity of true morels (Morchella), the main edible non-timber product from native Patagonian forests of Argentina.

Fungal Biol 2014 Sep-Oct;118(9-10):755-63. Epub 2014 Apr 13.

Protección Forestal, Centro Forestal CIEFAP, CC 14, 9200 Esquel, Chubut, Argentina; Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Argentina; Universidad Nacional de la Patagonia San Juan Bosco, Argentina.

Morchella species are edible fungi in high demand and therefore command high prices in world markets. Phenotypic-based identification at the species-level remains inadequate because of their complex life cycles, minor differences and plasticity of morphological characteristics between species, and the lack of agreement between scientific and common names. In Patagonia-Argentina, morels are associated with native forests of Austrocedrus chilensis (Cordilleran or Chilean cypress) and Nothofagus antarctica (ñire) and several exotic conifers that were introduced from western North America. Little is known about their taxonomy and phylogenetic relationships with other species in the genus. This work focused on the identification of collections of Morchella from Patagonia and their phylogenetic relationships with other species from the Northern Hemisphere. The comparison was made by analysis of DNA sequences obtained from four loci: the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) and the partial RNA polymerase I gene (RPB1) for the complete collection; and ITS, RPB1, RNA polymerase II gene (RPB2), and translation elongation factor (EF1-α) for the species-rich Elata Subclade. Analyses of individual and combined data sets revealed that Patagonian morels belong to the Elata Clade and comprised three strongly supported species-level lineages from both Patagonian native forest, and exotic trees introduced from western North America. One lineage was identified as Morchella frustrata phylogenetic species Mel-2, which is known from the USA and Canada. The second lineage, which appeared to be 'fire-adapted', was identified as Morchella septimelata phylogenetic species (Mel-7), which is also known from the USA. This species was collected from burned native forests mainly composed of A. chilensis and N. antarctica but also Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Blanco, which is native to western North America. The phylogenetic analyses suggested that the third species from Patagonia was nested within the species-rich Elata Subclade and represents a new species-level lineage (informally designated Mel-37) within Elata Clade. The present collections from Patagonia constitute the southernmost latitude from which Morchella has been reported to date. The identification of two Argentine morels as North American taxa is therefore a remarkable biogeographic pattern. In view of the hypothesis that the Elata Clade originated in western North America, we speculate that at least two of the lineages colonized South America from North America via long distance dispersal, migration or, more likely, they were introduced with the exotic tree species that they were collected near.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.funbio.2014.03.008DOI Listing
May 2015