Publications by authors named "Carole Manneville"

5 Publications

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A Simple and Efficient CRISPR Technique for Protein Tagging.

Cells 2020 Dec 5;9(12). Epub 2020 Dec 5.

Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, 4002 Basel, Switzerland.

Genetic knock-in using homology-directed repair is an inefficient process, requiring the selection of few modified cells and hindering its application to primary cells. Here, we describe Homology independent gene Tagging (HiTag), a method to tag a protein of interest by CRISPR in up to 66% of transfected cells with one single electroporation. The technique has proven effective in various cell types and can be used to knock in a fluorescent protein for live cell imaging, to modify the cellular location of a target protein and to monitor the levels of a protein of interest by a luciferase assay in primary cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cells9122618DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7762194PMC
December 2020

Genome-wide CRISPR screen for PARKIN regulators reveals transcriptional repression as a determinant of mitophagy.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2018 01 21;115(2):E180-E189. Epub 2017 Dec 21.

Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Basel CH 4002, Switzerland;

PARKIN, an E3 ligase mutated in familial Parkinson's disease, promotes mitophagy by ubiquitinating mitochondrial proteins for efficient engagement of the autophagy machinery. Specifically, PARKIN-synthesized ubiquitin chains represent targets for the PINK1 kinase generating phosphoS65-ubiquitin (pUb), which constitutes the mitophagy signal. Physiological regulation of PARKIN abundance, however, and the impact on pUb accumulation are poorly understood. Using cells designed to discover physiological regulators of PARKIN abundance, we performed a pooled genome-wide CRISPR/Cas9 knockout screen. Testing identified genes individually resulted in a list of 53 positive and negative regulators. A transcriptional repressor network including THAP11 was identified and negatively regulates endogenous PARKIN abundance. RNAseq analysis revealed the PARKIN-encoding locus as a prime THAP11 target, and CRISPR knockout in multiple cell types enhanced pUb accumulation. Thus, our work demonstrates the critical role of PARKIN abundance, identifies regulating genes, and reveals a link between transcriptional repression and mitophagy, which is also apparent in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons, a disease-relevant cell type.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1711023115DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5777035PMC
January 2018

CGG Repeat-Induced FMR1 Silencing Depends on the Expansion Size in Human iPSCs and Neurons Carrying Unmethylated Full Mutations.

Stem Cell Reports 2016 12 10;7(6):1059-1071. Epub 2016 Nov 10.

Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, 4056 Basel, Switzerland. Electronic address:

In fragile X syndrome (FXS), CGG repeat expansion greater than 200 triplets is believed to trigger FMR1 gene silencing and disease etiology. However, FXS siblings have been identified with more than 200 CGGs, termed unmethylated full mutation (UFM) carriers, without gene silencing and disease symptoms. Here, we show that hypomethylation of the FMR1 promoter is maintained in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from two UFM individuals. However, a subset of iPSC clones with large CGG expansions carries silenced FMR1. Furthermore, we demonstrate de novo silencing upon expansion of the CGG repeat size. FMR1 does not undergo silencing during neuronal differentiation of UFM iPSCs, and expression of large unmethylated CGG repeats has phenotypic consequences resulting in neurodegenerative features. Our data suggest that UFM individuals do not lack the cell-intrinsic ability to silence FMR1 and that inter-individual variability in the CGG repeat size required for silencing exists in the FXS population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.stemcr.2016.10.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5161530PMC
December 2016

Identification of Small Molecules Which Induce Skeletal Muscle Differentiation in Embryonic Stem Cells via Activation of the Wnt and Inhibition of Smad2/3 and Sonic Hedgehog Pathways.

Stem Cells 2016 Feb 17;34(2):299-310. Epub 2015 Nov 17.

Developmental and Molecular Pathways, Basel, Switzerland.

The multilineage differentiation capacity of mouse and human embryonic stem (ES) cells offers a testing platform for small molecules that mediate mammalian lineage determination and cellular specialization. Here we report the identification of two small molecules which drives mouse 129 ES cell differentiation to skeletal muscle with high efficiency without any genetic modification. Mouse embryoid bodies (EBs) were used to screen a library of 1,000 small molecules to identify compounds capable of inducing high levels of Pax3 mRNA. Stimulation of EBs with SMIs (skeletal muscle inducer, SMI1 and SMI2) from the screen resulted in a high percentage of intensively twitching skeletal muscle fibers 3 weeks after induction. Gene expression profiling studies that were carried out for mode of actions analysis showed that SMIs activated genes regulated by the Wnt pathway and inhibited expression of Smad2/3 and Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) target genes. A combination of three small molecules known to modulate these three pathways acted similarly to the SMIs found here, driving ES cells from 129 as well as Balb/c and C57Bl/6 to skeletal muscle. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the SMI drives ES cells to skeletal muscle via concerted activation of the Wnt pathway, and inhibition of Smad2/3 signaling and Shh pathways. This provides important developmental biological information about skeletal muscle differentiation from embryonic stem cells and may lead to the development of new therapeutics for muscle disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/stem.2228DOI Listing
February 2016

Plasticity of human adipose lineage cells toward endothelial cells: physiological and therapeutic perspectives.

Circulation 2004 Feb 20;109(5):656-63. Epub 2004 Jan 20.

Unité Mixte de Recherche 5018 Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Université Paul Sabatier, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Rangueil, Toulouse, France.

Background: Adipose tissue development and remodeling are closely associated with the growth of vascular network. We hypothesized that adipose tissue may contain progenitor cells with angiogenic potential and that therapy based on adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells administration may constitute a promising cell therapy in patients with ischemic disease.

Methods And Results: In mice, cultured stromal-vascular fraction (SVF) cells from adipose tissue have a great proangiogenic potential, comparable to that of bone marrow mononuclear cells in the mouse ischemic hindlimb model. Similarly, cultured human SVF cells differentiate into endothelial cells, incorporate into vessels, and promote both postischemic neovascularization in nude mice and vessel-like structure formation in Matrigel plug. In vitro, these cells represent a homogeneous population of CD34- and CD13-positive cells, which can spontaneously express the endothelial cell markers CD31 and von Willebrand factor when cultured in semisolid medium. Interestingly, dedifferentiated mature human adipocytes have the potential to rapidly acquire the endothelial phenotype in vitro and to promote neovascularization in ischemic tissue and vessel-like structure formation in Matrigel plug, suggesting that cells of endothelial and adipocyte phenotypes may have a common precursor.

Conclusions: This study demonstrates, for the first time, that adipocytes and endothelial cells have a common progenitor. Such adipose lineage cells participate in vascular-like structure formation in Matrigel plug and enhance the neovascularization reaction in ischemic tissue. These results also highlight the concept that adipose lineage cells represent a suitable new cell source for therapeutic angiogenesis in ischemic disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/01.CIR.0000114522.38265.61DOI Listing
February 2004