Publications by authors named "Carol Daugherty"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Up-regulation of steroid biosynthesis by retinoid signaling: Implications for aging.

Mech Ageing Dev 2015 Sep 21;150:74-82. Epub 2015 Aug 21.

Department of Cell Biology and Biochemistry, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX 79430, USA.

Retinoids (vitamin A and its derivatives) are critical for a spectrum of developmental and physiological processes, in which steroid hormones also play indispensable roles. The StAR protein predominantly regulates steroid biosynthesis in steroidogenic tissues. We have reported that regulation of retinoid, especially atRA and 9-cis RA, responsive StAR transcription is largely mediated by an LXR-RXR/RAR heterodimeric motif in the mouse StAR promoter. Herein we demonstrate that retinoids are capable of enhancing StAR protein, P-StAR, and steroid production in granulosa, adrenocortical, glial, and epidermal cells. Whereas transient expression of RARα and RXRα enhanced 9-cis RA induced StAR gene transcription, silencing of RXRα with siRNA, decreased StAR and steroid levels. An oligonucleotide probe encompassing an LXR-RXR/RAR motif bound to adrenocortical and epidermal keratinocyte nuclear proteins in EMSAs. ChIP studies revealed association of RARα and RXRα with the StAR proximal promoter. Further studies demonstrated that StAR mRNA levels decreased in diseased and elderly men and women skin tissues and that atRA could restore steroidogenesis in epidermal keratinocytes of aged individuals. These findings provide novel insights into the relevance of retinoid signaling in the up-regulation of steroid biosynthesis in various target tissues, and indicate that retinoid therapy may have important implications in age-related complications and diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mad.2015.08.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4583817PMC
September 2015

Molecular genetics of pseudoxanthoma elasticum: type and frequency of mutations in ABCC6.

Hum Mutat 2005 Sep;26(3):235-48

Charité, Franz Volhard Clinic, HELIOS Klinikum, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.

Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) is a systemic heritable disorder that affects the elastic tissue in the skin, eye, and cardiovascular system. Mutations in the ABCC6 gene cause PXE. We performed a mutation screen in ABCC6 using haplotype analysis in conjunction with direct sequencing to achieve a mutation detection rate of 97%. This screen consisted of 170 PXE chromosomes in 81 families, and detected 59 distinct mutations (32 missense, eight nonsense, and six likely splice-site point mutations; one small insertion; and seven small and five large deletions). Forty-three of these mutations are novel variants, which increases the total number of PXE mutations to 121. While most mutations are rare, three nonsense mutations, a splice donor site mutation, and the large deletion comprising exons 23-29 (c.2996_4208del) were identified as relatively frequent PXE mutations at 26%, 5%, 3.5%, 3%, and 11%, respectively. Chromosomal haplotyping with two proximal and two distal polymorphic markers flanking ABCC6 demonstrated that most chromosomes that carry these relatively frequent PXE mutations have related haplotypes specific for these mutations, which suggests that these chromosomes originate from single founder mutations. The types of mutations found support loss-of-function as the molecular mechanism for the PXE phenotype. In 76 of the 81 families, the affected individuals were either homozygous for the same mutation or compound heterozygous for two mutations. In the remaining five families with one uncovered mutation, affected showed allelic compound heterozygosity for the cosegregating PXE haplotype. This demonstrates pseudo-dominance as the relevant inheritance mechanism, since disease transmission to the next generation always requires one mutant allelic variant from each parent. In contrast to other previous clinical and molecular claims, our results show evidence only for recessive PXE. This has profound consequences for the genetic counseling of families with PXE.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/humu.20206DOI Listing
September 2005