Publications by authors named "Carly Bisset"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Multiple House Occupancy is Associated with Mortality in Hospitalised Patients with Covid-19.

Eur J Public Health 2021 May 17. Epub 2021 May 17.

Institute of Applied Health Science, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen Scotland.

Background: In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, many countries mandated staying at home to reduce transmission. This study examined the association between living arrangements (house occupancy numbers) and outcomes in COVID-19.

Methods: Study population was drawn from the COPE Study, a multicentre cohort study. House occupancy was defined as: living alone; living with one other person; living with multiple other people; or living in a nursing/residential home. Outcomes were time from admission to mortality and discharge (Cox regression), and Day-28 mortality (logistic regression), analyses were adjusted for key comorbidities and covariates including admission: age; sex, smoking; heart failure; admission CRP; COPD; eGFR, frailty and others.

Results: 1584 patients were included from 13 hospitals across UK and Italy: 676 (42.7%) were female, 907 (57.3%) were male, median age was 74 years (range: 19-101). At 28 days, 502 (31.7%) had died. Median admission CRP was 67, 82, 79.5 and 83mg/L for those living alone, with someone else, in a house of multiple occupancy and in a nursing/residential home, respectively. Compared to living alone, living with anyone was associated with increased mortality: within a couple (aHR 1.39, 95%CI 1.09-1.77, p = 0.007); living in a house of multiple occupancy (aHR=1.67, 95%CI 1.17-2.38, p = 0.005); and living in a residential home (aHR=1.36, 95%CI 1.03-1.80, p = 0.031).

Conclusion: For patients hospitalised with COVID-19, those living with one or more people had an increased association with mortality, they also exhibited higher CRP indicating increased disease severity suggesting they delayed seeking care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/ckab085DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8247274PMC
May 2021

'Let's talk about sex': a patient-led survey on sexual function after colorectal and pelvic floor surgery.

Colorectal Dis 2021 Jun 22;23(6):1524-1551. Epub 2021 Mar 22.

St Mark's Hospital and Imperial College London, London, UK.

Aim: Discussions regarding sex after colorectal and pelvic floor surgery are often overlooked by clinicians. This is the first patient designed and delivered study to explore sexual function and practices after colorectal surgery. The aim was to explore the questions about sex that matter to patients and their partners following colorectal or pelvic floor surgery through a patient and public involvement survey. The results of this work will underpin the creation of a sex patient reported outcome measure.

Methods: An anonymous online survey tool (Survey Monkey™) was disseminated via social media (Twitter, Facebook). Thematic analysis was applied to 130 free text comments posted by participants to identify key themes.

Results: Some 632 individuals completed the survey. Most respondents were women (80% n = 507), 49.5% (n = 312) were married and 14% (n = 87) identified as LGBT+ (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender +). Indications for surgery varied: 34% were treated for ulcerative colitis (n = 214); 31% Crohn's (n = 196); 17% (n = 109) cancer; and 17% (n = 110) for perianal fistula. For patients who had a stoma formed (85%, n = 540), over half (51%, n = 324) lived with their stoma for 1-5 years. Respondents reported substantial alterations to their preferences for sexual positions, sexual activity and body confidence following surgery. Most respondents indicated that they were not offered advice about sex by a healthcare professional.

Conclusions: The survey showed a substantial impact on the mechanics of sex following colorectal surgery. Few patients were offered preoperative information regarding sex, which has implications for informed consent. This study demonstrates a clear unmet need, voiced by patients, that open dialogue is necessary preoperatively to discuss sexual (dys)function.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/codi.15598DOI Listing
June 2021

A Systematic Review of the Abdominal Surgeon's Personality: Exploring Common Traits in Western Populations.

Behav Sci (Basel) 2020 Dec 26;11(1). Epub 2020 Dec 26.

Department of General Surgery, Royal Alexandra Hospital, Paisley PA2 9PN, UK.

The personality traits commonly seen in abdominal surgeons remains undefined, and its potential influence on decision-making and patient outcomes underexplored. This systematic review identified studies on abdominal surgeons who had undergone validated personality testing, with assessment of decision-making and post-operative patient outcomes. The study protocol was registered on PROSPERO (University of York, UK (CRD42019151375)). MEDLINE, Embase, PsycInfo and Cochrane Library databases were searched using the keywords: surgeon; surgeon personality; outcomes. All study designs were accepted including adult visceral surgeons published in English. Five articles from 3056 abstracts met our inclusion criteria and one article was identified from hand searches with two reviewers screening studies. Bias was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Six studies included 386 surgeons. Studies assessing personality using the Five Factor Model (four studies, 329 surgeons) demonstrated higher levels of conscientiousness (self-discipline, thoughtfulness), extraversion (sociability, emotional expression) and openness (creative, conventional) in surgeons versus population norms. Surgeon characterisation of agreeableness and emotional stability was less clear, with studies reporting mixed results. Post-operative outcomes were reported by only one study. Further exploration of the influence of surgeon personality and its influence on decision-making is necessary to deliver patient-centred care and targeted non-technical skills training for surgeons.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/bs11010002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7823302PMC
December 2020

The influence of social media on recruitment to surgical trials.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 07 28;20(1):201. Epub 2020 Jul 28.

Department of General Surgery, Royal Alexandra Hospital, Paisley, PA2 9PN, UK.

Background: Social media has changed the way surgeons communicate worldwide, particularly in dissemination of trial results. However, it is unclear if social media could be used in recruitment to surgical trials. This study aimed to investigate the influence of Twitter in promoting surgical recruitment in The Emergency Laparotomy and Frailty (ELF) Study.

Methods: The ELF Study was a UK-based, prospective, observational cohort that aimed to assess the influence of frailty on 90-day mortality in older adults undergoing emergency surgery. A power calculation required 500 patients to be recruited to detect a 10% change in mortality associated with frailty. A 12-week recruitment period was selected, calculated from information submitted by participating hospitals and the numbers of emergency surgeries performed in adults aged > 65 years. A Twitter handle was designed (@ELFStudy) with eye-catching logos to encourage enrolment and inform the public and clinicians involved in the study. Twitter Analytics and Twitonomy (Digonomy Pty Ltd) were used to analyse user engagement in relation to patient recruitment.

Results: After 90 days of data collection, 49 sites from Scotland, England and Wales recruited 952 consecutive patients undergoing emergency laparotomy, with data logged into a database created on REDCap. Target recruitment (n = 500) was achieved by week 11. A total of 591 tweets were published by @ELFStudy since its conception, making 218,136 impressions at time of writing. The number of impressions (number of times users see a particular tweet) prior to March 20th 2017 (study commencement date) was 23,335 (343.2 per tweet), compared to the recruitment period with 114,314 impressions (256.3 per tweet), ending June 20th 2017. Each additional tweet was associated with an increase in recruitment of 1.66 (95%CI 1.36 to 1.97; p < 0.001).

Conclusion: The ELF Study over-recruited by nearly 100%, reaching over 200,000 people across the U.K. Branding enhanced tweet aesthetics and helped increase tweet engagement to stimulate discussion and healthy competition amongst clinicians to aid trial recruitment. Other studies may draw from the social media experiences of the ELF Study to optimise collaboration amongst researchers.

Trial Registration: This study is registered online at www.clinicaltrials.gov (registration number NCT02952430 ) and has been approved by the National Health Service Research Ethics Committee.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-01072-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7388470PMC
July 2020

Systematic review protocol examining the influence of surgeon personality on perioperative decision making in abdominal surgery.

BMJ Open 2020 02 3;10(2):e035361. Epub 2020 Feb 3.

Department of General Surgery, Royal Alexandra Hospital, Paisley, UK.

Introduction: There is limited published literature exploring how the personality traits of surgeons may influence preoperative decision making, particularly in the context of visceral/abdominal surgery. Multiple validated personality scoring systems exist and have been used to describe surgeon personalities previously. The degree to which each trait is expressed by abdominal surgeons is neither currently known, nor the impact of these traits on postoperative outcomes. The protocol has been written in line with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Protocols checklist.

Methods And Analysis: The search strategy has been developed by a Health Scientist Librarian in collaboration with the review team. The search was conducted on 1st October 2019.Database subject headings and text words relating to 'abdominal/general surgeons', 'personality', 'postoperative outcomes' and 'decision making' formed the basis of our literature search strategy; the MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycInfo and Cochrane databases will be searched. Three reviewers will independently screen and appraise articles, with a fourth reviewer utilised if disagreements arise.A systematic narrative synthesis will be performed, with information presented in text and table format. These will summarise the findings and characteristics of any included studies. Using guidance from the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, the reviewers will describe the potential relationship and findings between studies using the narrative synthesis. Studies will only be reported if they are felt to have low or mid-levels of bias. Studies felt to display high levels of bias will be excluded.

Ethics And Dissemination: This study does not require ethical approval. The formal systematic review will be submitted for peer reviewed publication and presented at relevant conferences. The methods may inform future reviews in other surgical specialties regarding surgeon personality.

Prospero Registration Number: CRD42019151375.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2019-035361DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7045243PMC
February 2020

Re: Bacteriological study in perianal abscess is not useful and not cost-effective.

ANZ J Surg 2017 05;87(5):420-421

Department of General Surgery, Royal Alexandra Hospital, Paisley, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ans.13878DOI Listing
May 2017

Analysis of lesion localisation at colonoscopy: outcomes from a multi-centre U.K. study.

Surg Endosc 2017 07 8;31(7):2959-2967. Epub 2016 Nov 8.

Department of Surgery, Royal Alexandra Hospital, Corsebar Road, Paisley, PA2 9PN, Scotland, UK.

Background: Colonoscopy is currently the gold standard for detection of colorectal lesions, but may be limited in anatomically localising lesions. This audit aimed to determine the accuracy of colonoscopy lesion localisation, any subsequent changes in surgical management and any potentially influencing factors.

Methods: Patients undergoing colonoscopy prior to elective curative surgery for colorectal lesion/s were included from 8 registered U.K. sites (2012-2014). Three sets of data were recorded: patient factors (age, sex, BMI, screener vs. symptomatic, previous abdominal surgery); colonoscopy factors (caecal intubation, scope guide used, colonoscopist accreditation) and imaging modality. Lesion localisation was standardised with intra-operative location taken as the gold standard. Changes to surgical management were recorded.

Results: 364 cases were included; majority of lesions were colonic, solitary, malignant and in symptomatic referrals. 82% patients had their lesion/s correctly located at colonoscopy. Pre-operative CT visualised lesion/s in only 73% of cases with a reduction in screening patients (64 vs. 77%; p = 0.008). 5.2% incorrectly located cases at colonoscopy underwent altered surgical management, including conversion to open. Univariate analysis found colonoscopy accreditation, scope guide use, incomplete colonoscopy and previous abdominal surgery significantly influenced lesion localisation. On multi-variate analysis, caecal intubation and scope guide use remained significant (HR 0.35, 0.20-0.60 95% CI and 0.47; 0.25-0.88, respectively).

Conclusion: Lesion localisation at colonoscopy is incorrect in 18% of cases leading to potentially significant surgical management alterations. As part of accreditation, colonoscopists need lesion localisation training and awareness of when inaccuracies can occur.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00464-016-5313-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5487844PMC
July 2017

A Letter to the Editor.

Ann Surg 2018 02;267(2):e39

Department of General Surgery, Royal Alexandra Hospital, Paisley, Greater Glasgow and Clyde NHS Trust, Glasgow, Scotland, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SLA.0000000000002052DOI Listing
February 2018

Re: Role of inflammatory markers as predictors of laparotomy in patients presenting with acute abdomen.

ANZ J Surg 2015 Oct;85(10):792

Department of General Surgery, Royal Alexandra Hospital, Paisley, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ans.13202DOI Listing
October 2015
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