Publications by authors named "Carlos García Izquierdo"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Wastewater nutrient recovery using twin-layer microalgae technology for biofertilizer production.

Water Sci Technol 2020 Sep;82(6):1044-1061

BIOMASA PENINSULAR S.A., Calle Constancia 38, Bajo, 28002 Madrid, Spain.

This study evaluates the feasibility of advanced biofilm microalgae cultivation in a twin layer (TL) system for nutrient removal (N and P) as the tertiary treatment in small wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) located in sensitive areas. Furthermore, the potential valorisation of microalgae biomass as a component of bio-based fertilizers is assessed. Scenedesmus sp. was chosen among 33 microalgae strains for inoculation of TL due to its high growth rate and its nutrient uptake capacity. The tests carried out in the prototype were markedly efficient for total soluble and ammoniacal nitrogen removal (up to 66 and 94%, respectively). In terms of potential valorisation of microalgae, the nutrient content was 5.5% N (over 40% protein), 8.8% PO and 1.5% KO, high enzymatic activity, very low levels of heavy metals and no detectable pathogen presence. However, in the formulation of solid-state bio-based fertilizers, the microalgae proportions in blends of over 2% of microalgae led to negative effects on ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. ssp.) and barley (Hordeum vulgare ssp.). The obtained results demonstrate that TL represents a promising technology, which allows efficient tertiary treatment of urban wastewater and the production of high-quality bio-based fertilizer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2166/wst.2020.372DOI Listing
September 2020

A tree from waste: Decontaminated dredged sediments for growing forest tree seedlings.

J Environ Manage 2018 Apr 4;211:269-277. Epub 2018 Feb 4.

Dipartimento di Agricoltura, Ambiente e Alimenti, Università del Molise, 86100 Campobasso, Italy; The EFI Project Centre on Mountain Forests (MOUNTFOR), Edmund Mach Foundation, via E. Mach 1, 38010 San Michele all'Adige, TN, Italy.

The sediments dredged from a waterway and decontaminated through a phytoremediation process have been used as substrates alternatively to the traditional forest nursery substrate for pot productions of holm oak (Quercus ilex L.) planting stocks. The substrates, made by mixing decontaminated sediments to agricultural soil at different degrees, were tested in order to evaluate their suitability as growth substrates. The experiment was carried out at the nursery of the Department of Agricultural, Food and Forestry Systems of the University of Florence (Italy). The experimental design consisted of four randomized blocks with six pots as replicates for each of the following treatments: 100% sediments, 66% sediments, 33% sediments, 100% agronomic soil and 100% traditional peat based substrate. In each pot, one holm oak acorn was seeded. Germination and both physiological and morphological traits of the seedlings were analysed during and at the end of the first growing season. Holm oak grown in phytoremediated sediments at higher concentrations showed germination levels comparable to those in the traditional substrate, and survival capacity (especially in 66% sediments) slightly higher than in 100% soil. Physiological performance of seedlings resembled that on the traditional substrate which required the addition of fertilizer, at least for the first growing season. Seedlings grown in mixed substrates with higher sediment concentrations occasionally showed better photosynthetic capacity with improved connectivity between the units of the photosystem II. At the end of the first growing season, height as well as the number of growth flushes of the seedlings grown in sole sediment or soil-sediment substrates were similar to what generally is observed for forest nursery stock of Quercus spp.. Regarding the root-system articulation and growth in depth, results in the mixed substrates were comparable to those for seedlings grown in the traditional forest nursery media, and higher than seedlings grown in 100% agronomic soil. According to our results, the reclamation of dredged sediments can provide appropriate nursery substrate for germination beds for forestry species.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2018.01.059DOI Listing
April 2018

Testing decontaminated sediments as a substrate for ornamentals in field nursery plantations.

J Environ Manage 2017 Jul 21;197:681-693. Epub 2017 Apr 21.

Institute of Ecosystem Study-CNR, c/o Area di Ricerca di Pisa Via Moruzzi 1, Pisa, 56124, Italy.

When canals and harbours are dredged, huge amount of polluted sediments has to be stocked and transported to the landfill with incredibly high costs of management. Among the remediation techniques for the reclamation of polluted sediments and soils, phytoremediation represents a sustainable and effective technique though still not fully promoted or commercialized. In this study we have tested the suitability for plant nursing of a substrate resulting from sediments dredged from a canal and treated with phytoremediation. The experiment was set up in 2014. It aimed to test the physical, chemical and hydrological characteristics of two mixes of remediated sediments and agronomic soil (at 33% and 50% by volume) compared to control soil (100% agronomic soil), and to assess the growth of three ornamental species (Viburnum tinus L., Photinia x fraseri var. red robin, Eleagnus macrophylla Thunb.) together with the suitability for root balling. The mixed substrates produced good results in terms of water drainage, and were similar to the control in terms of soluble nutrients, guaranteeing and enhancing the aboveground and belowground growth of all the three species, especially V. tinus. In contrast, mixed substrates impaired root ball compaction with root ball breakage observed especially in 50% sediment/soil mix. Therefore, the use of remediated sediments in plant nursery can be limited to specific productions or practices.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2017.03.064DOI Listing
July 2017
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