Publications by authors named "Carla Landa"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Lupresan, a new drug that prevents or reverts the formation of nonbilayer phospholipid arrangements that trigger a murine lupus resembling human lupus.

Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2019 01 21;509(1):275-280. Epub 2018 Dec 21.

Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biológicas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Ciudad de México, 11340, Mexico. Electronic address:

Non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements (NPA) are lipid associations different from the bilayer, formed by the interactions of conic anionic lipids and divalent cations that produce an inverted micelle which is inserted between the lipid layers, so the polar heads of the outer lipids spread and expose new antigens. Since these structures are transient, they are not immunogenic, but if they are stabilized by drugs, such as chlorpromazine, they become immunogenic and induce anti-NPA antibodies that trigger a lupus-like disease in mice. Chloroquine is a drug used for the treatment of lupus; chloroquine has a quinoline ring and two positive charges that interact with conic anionic lipids and prevent or revert the formation of NPA. However, the polyamine spermidine is more effective, since it has three positive charges and interacts with more lipids, but polyamines cannot be used as drugs, because they are highly toxic. Here we report the design and synthesis of Lupresan, an analogous of chloroquine with its quinoline ring but with three positive charges. Lupresan is more effective in preventing or reverting the formation of NPA than chloroquine or spermidine, and as a consequence, it decreased auto-antibody titers and healed the malar rash in mice with lupus to a greater extent than chloroquine. A drug as Lupresan could be used for the treatment of human lupus.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbrc.2018.12.119DOI Listing
January 2019

Nonbilayer Phospholipid Arrangements Are Toll-Like Receptor-2/6 and TLR-4 Agonists and Trigger Inflammation in a Mouse Model Resembling Human Lupus.

J Immunol Res 2015 19;2015:369462. Epub 2015 Oct 19.

Biochemistry Department, National School of Biological Sciences, National Polytechnic Institute (IPN), 11340 Mexico City, DF, Mexico.

Systemic lupus erythematosus is characterized by dysregulated activation of T and B cells and autoantibodies to nuclear antigens and, in some cases, lipid antigens. Liposomes with nonbilayer phospholipid arrangements induce a disease resembling human lupus in mice, including IgM and IgG antibodies against nonbilayer phospholipid arrangements. As the effect of these liposomes on the innate immune response is unknown and innate immune system activation is necessary for efficient antibody formation, we evaluated the effect of these liposomes on Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, cytokine production, proinflammatory gene expression, and T, NKT, dendritic, and B cells. Liposomes induce TLR-4- and, to a lesser extent, TLR-2/TLR-6-dependent signaling in TLR-expressing human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages. Mice with the lupus-like disease had increased serum concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines, C3a and C5a; they also had more TLR-4-expressing splenocytes, a higher expression of genes associated with TRIF-dependent TLR-4-signaling and complement activation, and a lower expression of apoptosis-related genes, compared to healthy mice. The percentage of NKT and the percentage and activation of dendritic and B2 cells were also increased. Thus, TLR-4 and TLR-2/TLR-6 activation by nonbilayer phospholipid arrangements triggers an inflammatory response that could contribute to autoantibody production and the generation of a lupus-like disease in mice.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/369462DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4629040PMC
September 2016