Publications by authors named "Camille Ninio"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Red deer () Did Not Play the Role of Maintenance Host for Bluetongue Virus in France: The Burden of Proof by Long-Term Wildlife Monitoring and Snapshots.

Viruses 2019 09 27;11(10). Epub 2019 Sep 27.

UMR Virologie, INRA, Ecole Nationale Vétérinaire d'Alfort, laboratoire de santé animale d'Alfort, ANSES, Université Paris-Est, 94700 Maisons-Alfort, France, (C.V.).

Bluetongue virus (BTV) is a -borne pathogen infecting both domestic and wild ruminants. In Europe, the Red Deer () (RD) is considered a potential BTV reservoir, but persistent sylvatic cycle has not yet been demonstrated. In this paper, we explored the dynamics of BTV1 and BTV8 serotypes in the RD in France, and the potential role of that species in the re-emergence of BTV8 in livestock by 2015 (i.e., 5 years after the former last domestic cases). We performed 8 years of longitudinal monitoring (2008-2015) among 15 RD populations and 3065 individuals. We compared communities and feeding habits within domestic and wild animal environments (51,380 samples). diversity (>30 species) varied between them, but bridge-species able to feed on both wild and domestic hosts were abundant in both situations. Despite the presence of competent vectors in natural environments, BTV1 and BTV8 strains never spread in RD along the green corridors out of the domestic outbreak range. Decreasing antibody trends with no PCR results two years after the last domestic outbreak suggests that seropositive young RD were not recently infected but carried maternal antibodies. We conclude that RD did not play a role in spreading or maintaining BTV in France.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/v11100903DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6832957PMC
September 2019

Antibiotic treatment of the hard tick Ixodes ricinus: Influence on Midichloria mitochondrii load following blood meal.

Ticks Tick Borne Dis 2015 Jul 27;6(5):653-7. Epub 2015 May 27.

Dipartimento di Scienze Veterinarie e Sanità Pubblica, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 10, 20133 Milano, Italy. Electronic address:

Midichloria mitochondrii is the most prevalent symbiont of the hard tick Ixodes ricinus, present in 100% of eggs and adult females of wild ticks. This bacterium is intracellular, and is the only known symbiont able to invade the mitochondria of the host cells. However, the role that M. mitochondrii plays in the host metabolism has yet to be elucidated. Multiple lines of evidence indicate the possibility of transmission of this bacterium to the vertebrate host during the tick blood meal. In order to investigate the role of M. mitochondrii in the biology of the tick host, we performed an antibiotic treatment on Ixodes ricinus individuals, with the aim of reducing/eliminating the symbiont, and to potentially observe the dynamic of bacterial infection in the tick host. We microinjected engorged adult females of I. ricinus with tetracycline, and we allowed the resulting larvae to feed on gerbils treated with the same antibiotic. The amount of M. mitochondrii was evaluated at different stages of the experiment using molecular techniques. In addition we evaluated the presence/absence of the symbiont DNA in the blood of gerbils used for the larval feeding. The performed treatments did not allow to eliminate the symbiont population from the host tick, however it allowed to reduce the multiplication that occurs after the larval blood meal. These results open the way for future experiments, using different antibiotic molecules, different administration methods and antibiotic administration on subsequent tick stages, to fulfill the goal of eliminating M. mitochondrii from the host I. ricinus, a major step in our understanding of the impact of this bacterium on ticks.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ttbdis.2015.05.011DOI Listing
July 2015

Characterization of two cryptic species, Culicoides stigma and C.parroti (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), based on barcode regions and morphology.

J Vector Ecol 2013 Dec;38(2):260-5

Usc Vecpar-ANSES LSA, EA4688, Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, 51 rue Cognacq-Jay, 51096, Reims Cedex, France.

Biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are insect vectors of economically important veterinary diseases such as African horse sickness, bluetongue, and Schmallenberg virus. The identification of Culicoides based on morphological features can be difficult. Three species of biting midges, Culicoides nubeculosus, C. stigma, and C. parroti have emerged in the laboratory from mud collected around watering troughs on a farm in northern France. Emerging Culicoides were characterized morphologically and molecularly using molecular markers. The closely related species C. stigma and C.parroti showed highly divergent sequences for both mitochondrial (cytochrome B and cytochrome oxidase I) and ribosomal DNA first internal transcribed spacer. A RFLP based on a single restriction using the same enzyme (HaeIII) for both cytochrome C oxidase I and cytochrome B is proposed to identify these species.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1948-7134.2013.12039.xDOI Listing
December 2013

Emergence of Culicoides obsoletus from indoor and outdoor breeding sites.

Vet Parasitol 2011 Dec 20;183(1-2):125-9. Epub 2011 Jul 20.

USC Anses Vecpar - JE2533, College of Pharmacy, University of Reims Champagne-Ardenne, 51 rue Cognacq-Jay, 51100 Reims, France.

Culicoides obsoletus (Diptera: Ceratopogondae) is considered as the probable main vector of Bluetongue virus (BTV) in northern Europe. Its breeding sites are poorly documented at the present time. We report numerous emergences of C. obsoletus s. str. from soil samples collected in two holdings between August and September 2010. Specimens were collected regularly in the laboratory during 80 days. In one holding, 1584 C. obsoletus midges emerged from used litter collected inside a dairy cow building and 211 C. obsoletus midges emerged from manure left outside the farm buildings. In the second holding, the number of emergences observed was much lower, especially for indoor samples. We discuss the impact of the farming practices on the abundance of emergence between both holdings on one side and between indoor and outdoor breeding sites on the other side. The observation of a peak in emergence and high emergence rates recorded in the laboratory for indoor samples let us assume that these breeding sites are of great importance, especially when it comes to understand the biology of this widespread species and its role in the transmission of BTV.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetpar.2011.07.020DOI Listing
December 2011

Contribution to the knowledge of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) host preferences in France.

Parasitol Res 2011 Mar 22;108(3):657-63. Epub 2010 Oct 22.

Usc Vecpar-ANSES, JE 2533, Faculté de Pharmacie, Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, 51 rue Cognacq-Jay, 51096 Reims, France.

Knowledge on host-feeding pattern of blood-sucking insects helps to understand the epidemiology of a vector-born disease. We determined blood meal origin from blood-fed Culicoides thanks to molecular techniques. A set of primers was used to selectively amplify segment of vertebrates' prepronociceptin gene from abdomen of engorged Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). Vertebrate DNA was successfully amplified in 91% of blood-fed Culicoides assayed. Direct sequencing and comparison of resultant sequences with sequences in GenBank, using BLAST, lead to the specific identification of the host in 100% of the cases. A total of 157 blood-fed females belonging to 13 different Culicoides' species were captured thanks to light traps in different areas of France between 2008 and 2009. Blood meal origin was determined for 143 blood-fed midges: 59 Culicoides obsoletus, 18 Culicoides dewulfi, 16 Culicoides scoticus, 11 Culicoides chiopterus, 10 Culicoides lupicaris, 1 Culicoides pulicaris, 8 Culicoides punctatus, 10 Culicoides pallidicornis, 3 Culicoides achrayi, 2 Culicoides furcillatus, 3 Culicoides brunnicans, 1 Culicoides picturatus and 1 Culicoides poperinghensis. The predominant species in our study belong to the C. obsoletus complex; they are considered as putative vectors of Bluetongue virus in the north of Europe. C. chiopterus sampled fed only on cattle, while blood meal origin of C. dewulfi, C. obsoletus and C. scoticus was diversified. In our sampling, we found that midges were fed mainly on cattle (54%), rabbits (20%), horses (17%), sheep (4%), pigs or wild boars (4%) and human (1%). Cattle DNA was found in at least 11 different species of Culicoides assayed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00436-010-2110-9DOI Listing
March 2011