Publications by authors named "Camila Alviar"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Excessive and less complex body movement in children with autism during face-to-face conversation: An objective approach to behavioral quantification.

Autism Res 2021 Nov 27. Epub 2021 Nov 27.

Department of Child Psychiatry of Shenzhen Kangning Hospital, Shenzhen Mental Health Center, Shenzhen, China.

The majority of existing studies investigating characteristics of overt social behavior in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) relied on informants' evaluation through questionnaires and behavioral coding techniques. As a novelty, this study aimed to quantify the complex movements produced during social interactions in order to test differences in ASD movement dynamics and their convergence, or lack thereof, during social interactions. Twenty children with ASD and twenty-three children with typical development (TD) were videotaped while engaged in a face-to-face conversation with an interviewer. An image differencing technique was utilized to extract the movement time series. Spectral analyses were conducted to quantify the average power of movement, and the fractal scaling of movement. The degree of complexity matching was calculated to capture the level of behavioral coordination between the interviewer and children. Results demonstrated that the average power was significantly higher (pā€‰<ā€‰0.01), and the fractal scaling was steeper (pā€‰<ā€‰0.05) in children with ASD, suggesting excessive and less complex movement as compared to the TD peers. Complexity matching occurred between children and interviewers, but there was no reliable difference in the strength of matching between the ASD and TD children. Descriptive trends in the interviewer's behavior suggest that her movements adapted to match both ASD and TD movements equally well. The findings of our study might shed light on seeking novel behavioral markers of ASD, and on developing automatic ASD screening techniques during daily social interactions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/aur.2646DOI Listing
November 2021

Complex Communication Dynamics: Exploring the Structure of an Academic Talk.

Cogn Sci 2019 03;43(3):e12718

Cognitive and Information Sciences, University of California, Merced.

Communication is a multimodal phenomenon. The cognitive mechanisms supporting it are still understudied. We explored a natural dataset of academic lectures to determine how communication modalities are used and coordinated during the presentation of complex information. Using automated and semi-automated techniques, we extracted and analyzed, from the videos of 30 speakers, measures capturing the dynamics of their body movement, their slide change rate, and various aspects of their speech (speech rate, articulation rate, fundamental frequency, and intensity). There were consistent but statistically subtle patterns in the use of speech rate, articulation rate, intensity, and body motion across the presentation. Principal component analysis also revealed patterns of system-like covariation among modalities. These findings, although tentative, do suggest that the cognitive system is integrating body, slides, and speech in a coordinated manner during natural language use. Further research is needed to clarify the specific coordination patterns that occur between the different modalities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cogs.12718DOI Listing
March 2019

Interacting Timescales in Perspective-Taking.

Front Psychol 2018 10;9:1278. Epub 2018 Sep 10.

Cognitive and Information Sciences, University of California, Merced, Merced, CA, United States.

Through theoretical discussion, literature review, and a computational model, this paper poses a challenge to the notion that perspective-taking involves a fixed architecture in which particular processes have priority. For example, some research suggests that egocentric perspectives can arise more quickly, with other perspectives (such as of task partners) emerging only secondarily. This theoretical dichotomy-between fast egocentric and slow other-centric processes-is challenged here. We propose a general view of perspective-taking as an emergent phenomenon governed by the interplay among cognitive mechanisms that accumulate information at different timescales. We first describe the pervasive relevance of perspective-taking to cognitive science. A dynamical systems model is then introduced that explicitly formulates the timescale interaction proposed. This model illustrates that, rather than having a rigid time course, perspective-taking can be fast or slow depending on factors such as task context. Implications are discussed, with ideas for future empirical research.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2018.01278DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6139380PMC
September 2018
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