Publications by authors named "Camelia Algora"

5 Publications

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GlobalFungi, a global database of fungal occurrences from high-throughput-sequencing metabarcoding studies.

Sci Data 2020 07 13;7(1):228. Epub 2020 Jul 13.

Institute of Microbiology of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Vídeňská 1083, 14220, Praha 4, Czech Republic.

Fungi are key players in vital ecosystem services, spanning carbon cycling, decomposition, symbiotic associations with cultivated and wild plants and pathogenicity. The high importance of fungi in ecosystem processes contrasts with the incompleteness of our understanding of the patterns of fungal biogeography and the environmental factors that drive those patterns. To reduce this gap of knowledge, we collected and validated data published on the composition of soil fungal communities in terrestrial environments including soil and plant-associated habitats and made them publicly accessible through a user interface at https://globalfungi.com . The GlobalFungi database contains over 600 million observations of fungal sequences across > 17 000 samples with geographical locations and additional metadata contained in 178 original studies with millions of unique nucleotide sequences (sequence variants) of the fungal internal transcribed spacers (ITS) 1 and 2 representing fungal species and genera. The study represents the most comprehensive atlas of global fungal distribution, and it is framed in such a way that third-party data addition is possible.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41597-020-0567-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7359306PMC
July 2020

Lignocellulolytic systems of soil bacteria: A vast and diverse toolbox for biotechnological conversion processes.

Biotechnol Adv 2019 11 22;37(6):107374. Epub 2019 Mar 22.

Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology, Institute of Microbiology of the CAS, Průmyslová 595, Vestec 252 50, Czech Republic. Electronic address:

Lignocellulose from plant biomass represents an abundant and renewable source for the production of environmentally friendly chemicals and biofuels. However, its recalcitrant nature entails the use of complex biochemical reactions that are still challenging. Since the degradation of lignocellulose is the current bottleneck of the conversion processes, the search for novel enzymes and microbial strains for degrading plant biomass is of high importance. Currently, bacteria are in the spotlight as promising candidates for novel conversion strategies due to their wide functional diversity and versatility. Here, we review the lines of evidence that show the high potential of bacterial strains from soil for biomass conversion ranging from strain characterization to metagenome and metatranscriptome analysis. Substantial and diverse fractions of soil bacteria are able to decompose the major lignocellulose components. To do that, bacteria evolved structurally variable and often highly complex lignocellulolytic systems composed of enzymes as well as proteins involved in efficient substrate binding. Both as individual components or in combination, bacterial enzymes, and accessory proteins appear to be promising tools in the biotechnological valorization of lignocellulose.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biotechadv.2019.03.013DOI Listing
November 2019

Manganese and iron as structuring parameters of microbial communities in Arctic marine sediments from the Baffin Bay.

FEMS Microbiol Ecol 2015 Jun 19;91(6). Epub 2015 May 19.

Department of Isotope Biogeochemistry, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany

The Arctic Baffin Bay between Canada and Greenland is sea ice-covered during the majority of the year, restricting primary production to the summer months. Sediments receive low amounts of mostly terrestrial- and less marine-derived organic matter. To study microbial communities constrained by physicochemical conditions changing with distance from land and ocean depth, we applied high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing and compared sequence diversity with biogeochemical parameters in 40 different sediment samples. Samples originated from seven cores down to 470 cm below seafloor along a shelf-to-basin transect. Bacterial diversity decreased faster with depth in basin than in shelf sediments, suggesting higher organic matter content sustained diversity into greater depths. All samples were dominated by Betaproteobacteria (mostly order Burkholderiales), which were especially abundant in basin sediments with low organic carbon and high Mn and Fe pore water concentrations. Strong statistical correlations between concentrations of reduced Mn and/or Fe and the relative abundances of Betaproteobacteria suggest that this group is involved in metal reduction in Baffin Bay sediments. Dehalococcoidia (phylum Chloroflexi) were abundant in all samples, especially in shelf sediments with high organic content. This study indicates that Mn and/or Fe play important roles structuring microbial communities in Arctic sediments poor in organic matter.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/femsec/fiv056DOI Listing
June 2015

Development and application of primers for the class Dehalococcoidia (phylum Chloroflexi) enables deep insights into diversity and stratification of subgroups in the marine subsurface.

Environ Microbiol 2015 Oct 26;17(10):3540-56. Epub 2014 Jun 26.

Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Permoserstraße 15, Leipzig, D-04318, Germany.

Bacteria of the class Dehalococcoidia (DEH) (phylum Chloroflexi) are widely distributed in the marine subsurface and are especially prevalent in deep marine sediments. Nevertheless, little is known about the specific distributions of DEH subgroups at different sites and depths. This study therefore specifically examined the distributions of DEH through depths of various marine sediment cores by quantitative PCR and pyrosequencing using newly designed DEH 16S rRNA gene targeting primers. Quantification of DEH showed populations may establish in shallow sediments (i.e. upper centimetres), although as low relative proportions of total Bacteria, yet often became more prevalent in deeper sediments. Pyrosequencing revealed pronounced diversity co-exists within single biogeochemical zones, and that clear and sometimes abrupt shifts in relative proportions of DEH subgroups occur with depth. These shifts indicate varying metabolic properties exist among DEH subgroups. The distributional changes in DEH subgroups with depth may be related to a combination of biogeochemical factors including the availability of electron acceptors such as sulfate, the composition of organic matter and depositional regimes. Collectively, the results suggest DEH exhibit wider metabolic and genomic diversity than previously recognized, and this contributes to their widespread occurrence in the marine subsurface.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1462-2920.12510DOI Listing
October 2015