Publications by authors named "C de Baat"

184 Publications

[Good oral care deserves to be better integrated into primary care].

Ned Tijdschr Tandheelkd 2021 Jun;128(6):331-338

Oral and general health are inextricable. In primary care, the fields of care by general practioners, youth healthcare, healthcare for older people and oral care are all distinctly separated. Healthcare professionals are increasingly confronted with the complexity and increase in Noncommunicable diseases (NCD's) and an aging population. The aetiology of NCD's in primary care concern the professional fields of all healthcare professionals mentioned, meaning that lifestyle-related risks might be prevented more effectively through collaboration. In primary care, the number of medically compromised people is on the rise and healthcare professionals encounter each other's patients, whose risks remain invisible to them. Through collaboration such problems could be faced more effectively. Better integration of oral care into primary care can also contribute to the quality of care and safety of care receivers, and reduce further inequality. In order to better design this integration with the help of innovation, more practicebased research and implementation is needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5177/ntvt.2021.06.21036DOI Listing
June 2021

[Facial angioedema following pharmacotherapy with an ACE inhibitor].

Ned Tijdschr Tandheelkd 2021 May;128(5):259-262

A 56-year-old women suddenly had a swelling on her right cheek and on the right side of her upper lip, for which she decided to first visit her family physician and subsequently her family dentist. During the past two years, she was treated for an ovarian carcinoma by an oncologist. Recently, she was using the antihypertensive ACE inhibitor enalapril, prescribed by her family physician. Consultation between her family dentist, family physician and oncologist led to the diagnosis angioedema as an adverse effect of enalapril. The family physician replaced enalapril by the angiotensin II receptor blocker losartan. Subsequently, the swelling disappeared within two days. This angioedema type occurs most frequently in the head and neck area. Oropharyngeal, tongue and laryngeal oedema are very dangerous because they may cause airway obstruction. Today, a live-threatening or fatal condition is mostly prevented as a result of better vigilance of dentists and physicians. Nevertheless, such a condition will still occur occasionally.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5177/ntvt.2021.05.21019DOI Listing
May 2021

[Medicaments and oral healthcare. Medicaments potentially inducing angioedema and/or urticaria].

Ned Tijdschr Tandheelkd 2021 May;128(5):269-276

Angioedema stems from increased vasodilation and vascular permeability, resulting in extravasation of fluid. Hereditary and acquired types of angioedema can be distinguished, with 3 and 4 subtypes, respectively. Groups of medicaments potentially inducing angioedema are, among others: ACE inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, thrombocyte aggregation inhibitors and immunosuppressive agents. Urticaria is characterised by red, slightly raised swellings, usually associated with a strong itching sensation and can be subdivided in an acute and a chronic type. Mast cells in the uppermost layer of the skin or the mucous membranes release a lot of histamine, increasing the dilation and permeability of blood capillaries, resulting in extravasation of fluid. Medicaments potentially inducing urticaria are, among others, the following groups: analgesics, anaesthetics, antibiotics, antidepressants, antihistamines, antihypertensives, antifungals, corticosteroids, H2 blockers, cancer medicaments, muscle relaxants, thrombocyte aggregation inhibitors and vaccines. Medical history and being alert when administering and prescribing anaesthetics, analgesics and antibiotics are very important in the prevention or treatment of angioedema and/or urticaria.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5177/ntvt.2021.05.20098DOI Listing
May 2021

Medications and addictive substances potentially inducing or attenuating sleep bruxism and/or awake bruxism.

J Oral Rehabil 2021 Mar 10;48(3):343-354. Epub 2020 Aug 10.

Foundation for Oral Health and Parkinson's Disease, Oegstgeest, The Netherlands.

Bruxism is a repetitive jaw-muscle activity characterised by clenching or grinding of the teeth and/or by bracing or thrusting of the mandible. It can occur during sleep, indicated as sleep bruxism, or during wakefulness, indicated as awake bruxism. Exogenous risk indicators of sleep bruxism and/or awake bruxism are, among others, medications and addictive substances, whereas also several medications seem to have the potential to attenuate sleep bruxism and/or awake bruxism. The objective of this study was to present a narrative literature on medications and addictive substances potentially inducing or aggravating sleep bruxism and/or awake bruxism and on medications potentially attenuating sleep bruxism and/or awake bruxism. Literature reviews reporting evidence or indications for sleep bruxism and/or awake bruxism as an adverse effect of several (classes of) medications as well as some addictive substances and literature reviews on medications potentially attenuating sleep bruxism and/or awake bruxism were used as starting point and guidelines to describe the topics mentioned. Additionally, two literature searches were established on PubMed. Three types of bruxism were distinguished: sleep bruxism, awake bruxism and non-specified bruxism. Generally, there are insufficient evidence-based data to draw definite conclusions concerning medications and addictive substances inducing or aggravating sleep bruxism and/or awake bruxism as well as concerning medications attenuating sleep bruxism and/or awake bruxism. There are insufficient evidence-based data to draw definite conclusions concerning medications and addictive substances inducing or aggravating sleep bruxism and/or awake bruxism as well as concerning medications attenuating sleep bruxism and/or awake bruxism.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/joor.13061DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7984358PMC
March 2021

[The objective oral health of Parkinson's disease patients].

Ned Tijdschr Tandheelkd 2020 May;127(5):318-322

In this article, the results of a research project on the objective oral health of Parkinson's disease patients, related to the duration and the progression of the disease, are reported. Participants were 74 patients with Parkinson's disease and 74 control persons. All participants were orally examined. Dentate Parkinson's disease patients had statistically significantly more teeth with carious lesions, more tooth root remnants, and more biofilm and food particles when compared to dentate control persons. Within the group of dentate Parkinson's disease patients, the number of teeth with restorations as well as the number of mobile teeth were positively related to the duration of the disease. Additionally, in this group the number of teeth with carious lesions, the number of teeth with restorations, and the number of tooth root remnants were positively related to the progression of the disease. Parkinson's disease patients need daily oral hygiene care support, particularly in advanced stages of the disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5177/ntvt.2020.05.19131DOI Listing
May 2020
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