Publications by authors named "C Verhamme"

67 Publications

Serum Contactin-1 in CIDP: A Cross-Sectional Study.

Neurol Neuroimmunol Neuroinflamm 2021 Jul 20;8(5). Epub 2021 Jul 20.

From the Department of Neurology and Neurophysiology (L.W., C.V., F.E.), Amsterdam Neuroscience, Amsterdam UMC, Location AMC, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; Neuromuscular Diseases Unit (L.M.-A., C.L., L.Q.), Department of Neurology, Hospital de La Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain; Department of Clinical Neurosciences (J.F., S.R.), West Wing, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, United Kingdom; Neurochemistry Lab (M.J.A.K.-S., C.E.T.), Department of Clinical Chemistry, Amsterdam Neuroscience, Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; and Department of Neurology (M.C., Z.L., J.K.), Amsterdam Neuroscience, Amsterdam UMC, Location VU Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Objective: To investigate whether serum levels of contactin-1, a paranodal protein, correlate with paranodal injury as seen in patients with CIDP with antibodies targeting the paranodal region.

Methods: Serum contactin-1 levels were measured in 187 patients with CIDP and 222 healthy controls. Paranodal antibodies were investigated in all patients.

Results: Serum contactin-1 levels were lower in patients (N = 41) with paranodal antibodies compared with patients (N = 146) without paranodal antibodies ( < 0.01) and showed good discrimination between these groups (area under the curve 0.84; 95% CI: 0.76-0.93).

Conclusions: These findings suggest that serum contactin-1 levels have the potential to serve as a possible diagnostic biomarker of paranodal injury in CIDP.

Classification Of Evidence: This study provides class II evidence that serum contactin-1 levels can discriminate between patients with CIDP with or without paranodal antibodies with a sensitivity of 71% (95% CI: 56%-85%) and a specificity of 97% (95% CI: 83%-100%).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/NXI.0000000000001040DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8293285PMC
July 2021

Expert consensus on the combined investigation of ulnar neuropathy at the elbow using electrodiagnostic tests and nerve ultrasound.

Clin Neurophysiol 2021 May 29. Epub 2021 May 29.

Department of Neurology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA.

The addition of ultrasound (US) to electrodiagnostic (EDX) tests can significantly enhance the accuracy of testing for ulnar neuropathy at the elbow (UNE). We aimed to obtain expert consensus to guide clinicians on the combined use of EDX and US in UNE investigation. Consensus was achieved using the Delphi method. Two consecutive anonymised questionnaires were submitted to 15 experts, who were asked to choose their level of agreement with each statement. Consensus was pre-defined as ≥ 80% rating agreement. The experts concluded that all investigations of UNE should include both nerve conduction studies and US. There was consensus that US should include cross-sectional area measurement and assessment of nerve mobility at the elbow, and that the entire ulnar nerve should be imaged. This study defined expert opinion on the 'core' techniques that should be used routinely in the UNE investigation using EDX and US. Areas with lack of consensus highlighted some controversial issues in the current use of these diagnostic modalities and the need for future research. This document is an initial step to guide clinicians on the combined investigation of UNE using EDX and US, to be regularly updated as new research emerges.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clinph.2021.04.018DOI Listing
May 2021

Deriving reference values for nerve conduction studies from existing data using mixture model clustering.

Clin Neurophysiol 2021 Aug 21;132(8):1820-1829. Epub 2021 May 21.

Department of Neurology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands. Electronic address:

Objective: to obtain locally valid reference values (RVs) from existing nerve conduction study (NCS) data.

Methods: we used age, sex, height and limb temperature-based mixture model clustering (MMC) to identify normal and abnormal measurements on NCS data from two university hospitals. We compared MMC-derived RVs to published data; examined the effect of using different variables; validated MMC-derived RVs using independent data from 26 healthy control subjects and investigated their clinical applicability for the diagnosis of polyneuropathy.

Results: MMC-derived RVs were similar to published RVs. Clustering can be achieved using only sex and age as variables. MMC is likely to yield reliable results with fewer abnormal than normal measurements and when the total number of measurements is at least 300. Measurements from healthy controls fell within the 95% MMC-derived prediction interval in 97.4% of cases.

Conclusions: MMC can be used to obtain RVs from existing data, providing a locally valid, accurate reflection of the (ab)normality of an NCS result.

Significance: MMC can be used to generate locally valid RVs for any test for which sufficient data are available..
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clinph.2021.04.013DOI Listing
August 2021

Distal muscle weakness and optic atrophy without central nervous system involvement in a patient with a homozygous missense mutation in the C19ORF12-gene.

Clin Neurol Neurosurg 2021 Jul 20;206:106637. Epub 2021 Apr 20.

Department of Clinical Genetics, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Variants of the C19ORF12-gene have been described in patients with spastic paraplegia type 43 and in patients with mitochondrial membrane protein-associated neurodegeneration (MPAN), a subtype of neurodegeneration associated with brain iron accumulation (NBIA). In both subtypes optic atrophy and neuropathy have been frequently described. This case report describes a patient with bilateral optic atrophy and severe distal muscle weakness based on motor neuropathy without involvement of the central nervous system. Exome sequencing revealed a homozygous pathogenic missense variant (c.187G>C;p.Ala63Pro) of the C19ORF12-gene while iron deposits were absent on repeat MR-imaging of the brain, thus showing that peripheral neuropathy and optic neuropathy can be the sole manifestations of the C19ORF12-related disease spectrum whereby iron accumulation in the brain may be absent.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clineuro.2021.106637DOI Listing
July 2021

Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of the brachial plexus shows specific changes in nerve architecture in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, multifocal motor neuropathy and motor neuron disease.

Eur J Neurol 2021 Aug 27;28(8):2716-2726. Epub 2021 May 27.

Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Background: The immunological pathophysiologies of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) differ considerably, but neither has been elucidated completely. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging, T2 mapping, and fat fraction analysis may indicate in vivo pathophysiological changes in nerve architecture. Our study aimed to systematically study nerve architecture of the brachial plexus in patients with CIDP, MMN, motor neuron disease (MND) and healthy controls using these quantitative MRI techniques.

Methods: We enrolled patients with CIDP (n = 47), MMN (n = 29), MND (n = 40) and healthy controls (n = 10). All patients underwent MRI of the brachial plexus and we obtained diffusion parameters, T2 relaxation times and fat fraction using an automated processing pipeline. We compared these parameters between groups using a univariate general linear model.

Results: Fractional anisotropy was lower in patients with CIDP compared to healthy controls (p < 0.001), patients with MND (p = 0.010) and MMN (p < 0.001). Radial diffusivity was higher in patients with CIDP compared to healthy controls (p = 0.015) and patients with MND (p = 0.001) and MMN (p < 0.001). T2 relaxation time was elevated in patients with CIDP compared to patients with MND (p = 0.023). Fat fraction was lower in patients with CIDP and MMN compared to patients with MND (both p < 0.001).

Conclusion: Our results show that quantitative MRI parameters differ between CIDP, MMN and MND, which may reflect differences in underlying pathophysiological mechanisms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ene.14896DOI Listing
August 2021
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