Publications by authors named "C Reisser"

55 Publications

Understanding connectivity of pearl oyster populations within Tuamotu atoll semi-closed lagoons: Cumulative insight from genetics and biophysical modelling approaches.

Mar Pollut Bull 2021 Jun 8;167:112324. Epub 2021 Apr 8.

UMR EIO, IFREMER Centre du Pacifique, Unité RMPF, BP49, Vairao, Tahiti, French Polynesia; MARBEC, Univ Montpellier, CNRS, IFREMER, IRD, Montpellier, France.

Connectivity affects species demography, (meta)population dynamics, evolution, phylogeny and biogeography. Various methodological approaches are applied to measure connectivity. Biophysical modelling can explore systematically the influence of atmospheric, oceanic and ecological forcing, while genetics measures connectivity patterns within the sampling strategy limit. In the Pacific Ocean pearl farming lagoons, the activity relies on spat collecting of the black lipped pearl oyster Pinctada margaritifera occurring after the larval dispersal phase, which follows spawning from wild or farmed populations. Biophysical 3D modelling and genomic studies have both separately brought insights on within-lagoon connectivity and on the origin of spats. Here, we combined previous genetics results with new realistic biophysical modelling scenarios to elucidate connectivity in Ahe Atoll lagoon. When combined, we identified the weather sequence likely explaining the realized connectivity observations. We discuss the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of combining these two approaches considering specific pearl farming demographic connectivity questions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2021.112324DOI Listing
June 2021

Environmentally Driven Color Variation in the Pearl Oyster var. (Linnaeus, 1758) Is Associated With Differential Methylation of CpGs in Pigment- and Biomineralization-Related Genes.

Front Genet 2021 19;12:630290. Epub 2021 Mar 19.

IHPE, Université de Montpellier, CNRS, IFREMER, Université de Perpignan Via Domitia, Montpellier, France.

Today, it is common knowledge that environmental factors can change the color of many animals. Studies have shown that the molecular mechanisms underlying such modifications could involve epigenetic factors. Since 2013, the pearl oyster var. has become a biological model for questions on color expression and variation in Mollusca. A previous study reported color plasticity in response to water depth variation, specifically a general darkening of the nacre color at greater depth. However, the molecular mechanisms behind this plasticity are still unknown. In this paper, we investigate the possible implication of epigenetic factors controlling shell color variation through a depth variation experiment associated with a DNA methylation study performed at the whole genome level with a constant genetic background. Our results revealed six genes presenting differentially methylated CpGs in response to the environmental change, among which four are linked to pigmentation processes or regulations (, , , and ), especially those leading to darker phenotypes. Interestingly, the genes and , both involved in the biomineralization process (deposition of aragonite and calcite crystals), also showed differential methylation, suggesting that a possible difference in the physical/spatial organization of the crystals could cause darkening (iridescence or transparency modification of the biomineral). These findings are of great interest for the pearl production industry, since wholly black pearls and their opposite, the palest pearls, command a higher value on several markets. They also open the route of epigenetic improvement as a new means for pearl production improvement.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fgene.2021.630290DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8018223PMC
March 2021

Molecular Pathways and Pigments Underlying the Colors of the Pearl Oyster var. (Linnaeus 1758).

Genes (Basel) 2021 03 15;12(3). Epub 2021 Mar 15.

IFREMER, UMR 241 Écosystèmes Insulaires Océaniens, Labex Corail, Centre Ifremer du Pacifique, BP 49, 98725 Tahiti, France.

The shell color of the Mollusca has attracted naturalists and collectors for hundreds of years, while the molecular pathways regulating pigment production and the pigments themselves remain poorly described. In this study, our aim was to identify the main pigments and their molecular pathways in the pearl oyster -the species displaying the broadest range of colors. Three inner shell colors were investigated-red, yellow, and green. To maximize phenotypic homogeneity, a controlled population approach combined with common garden conditioning was used. Comparative analysis of transcriptomes (RNA-seq) of with different shell colors revealed the central role of the heme pathway, which is involved in the production of red (uroporphyrin and derivates), yellow (bilirubin), and green (biliverdin and cobalamin forms) pigments. In addition, the Raper-Mason, and purine metabolism pathways were shown to produce yellow pigments (pheomelanin and xanthine) and the black pigment eumelanin. The presence of these pigments in pigmented shell was validated by Raman spectroscopy. This method also highlighted that all the identified pathways and pigments are expressed ubiquitously and that the dominant color of the shell is due to the preferential expression of one pathway compared with another. These pathways could likely be extrapolated to many other organisms presenting broad chromatic variation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/genes12030421DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7998362PMC
March 2021

Correction: Reisser, C.M.O. et al. Population Connectivity and Genetic Assessment of Exploited and Natural Populations of Pearl Oysters within a French Polynesian Atoll Lagoon. 2020, , 426.

Genes (Basel) 2020 Nov 16;11(11). Epub 2020 Nov 16.

Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, UMR-9220 ENTROPIE, IRD, Université de la Réunion, IFREMER, CNRS, Université de la Nouvelle-Calédonie, Nouméa BPA5, New Caledonia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/genes11111358DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7696931PMC
November 2020

Population Connectivity and Genetic Assessment of Exploited and Natural Populations of Pearl Oysters within a French Polynesian Atoll Lagoon.

Genes (Basel) 2020 04 15;11(4). Epub 2020 Apr 15.

Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, UMR-9220 ENTROPIE, IRD, Université de la Réunion, IFREMER, CNRS, Université de la Nouvelle-Calédonie), Nouméa BPA5, New Caledonia.

In French Polynesia, the production and exportation of black pearls through the aquaculture of the black-lip pearl oyster provide the second largest economic income for the country after tourism. This industry entirely relies on the collection of natural spats from few highly recruiting lagoons. In recent years, pearl oyster producers have experienced variable success rates in spat collection, with significant spatial and temporal variability in spat supply, driving uncertainty in the future of pearl production. This study combines, for the first time in a farmed lagoon, genetic (SNPs), demographic (sex ratio, age), and biophysical data (larval dispersal modelling) to shed new light on population dynamics, connectivity, and spat recruitment in Ahe Atoll, a well-studied pearl farming site. Our results indicate that the geographical structuring of the natural populations and the contribution of both natural and exploited stocks to the production of spats result from the interaction of hydrodynamic features, life history traits and demographic parameters: the northeastern natural populations are older, not well connected to the southwestern natural populations and are not replenished by larvae produced by adjacent exploited populations. Moreover, we observe that the exploited populations did not contribute to larval production during our experiment, despite a sampling period set during the most productive season for spat collection. This is likely the result of a strong male bias in the exploited populations, coupled with a sweepstakes reproductive strategy of the species. Our results warrant further investigations over the future of the northeastern older natural populations and a reflection on the current perliculture techniques.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/genes11040426DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7230779PMC
April 2020
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