Publications by authors named "C Niek van Dijk"

524 Publications

Ten-year revision rates of contemporary total ankle arthroplasties equal 22%. A meta-analysis.

Foot Ankle Surg 2021 Jun 6. Epub 2021 Jun 6.

Department of Orthopedics, Xpert Orthopedics and Specialized Centre of Orthopedic Research and Education (SCORE), Laarderhoogtweg 12, 1101 EA Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Background: The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence criterion for hip replacements is a (projected) revision rate of less than 5% after 10 years. No such criterion is available for ankle prostheses. The objective of the current study is to compare survival rates of contemporary primary ankle prostheses to the hip-benchmark.

Methods: The PRISMA methodology was used. Eligible for inclusion were clinical studies reporting revision rates of currently available primary total ankle prostheses. Data was extracted using preconstructed forms. The total and prosthesis-specific annual revision rate was calculated.

Results: Fifty-seven articles of eight different ankle prostheses were included (n = 5371), totaling 513 revisions at an average 4.6 years of follow-up. An annual revision rate of 2.2 was found (i.e. an expected revision rate of 22% at 10 years).

Conclusions: The expected 10-year revision rate of contemporary ankle prostheses is lower than the current benchmark for hip prostheses.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fas.2021.05.014DOI Listing
June 2021

Quality of Life Changes After Surgery for Metastatic Spinal Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

Clin Spine Surg 2021 Jun 9. Epub 2021 Jun 9.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Orthopaedic Oncology Service, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam-Zuidoost Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Study Design: This was a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Objective: A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to assess the quality of life (QoL) after open surgery for spinal metastases, and how surgery affects physical, social/family, emotional, and functional well-being.

Summary Of Background Data: It remains questionable to what extent open surgery improves QoL for metastatic spinal disease, it would be interesting to quantify the magnitude and duration of QoL benefits-if any-after surgery for spinal metastases.

Materials And Methods: Included were studies measuring QoL before and after nonpercutaneous, open surgery for spinal metastases for various indications including pain, spinal cord compression, instability, or tumor control. A random-effect model assessed standardized mean differences (SMDs) of summary QoL scores between baseline and 1, 3, 6, or 9-12 months after surgery.

Results: The review yielded 10 studies for data extraction. The pooled QoL summary score improved from baseline to 1 month (SMD=1.09, P<0.001), to 3 months (SMD=1.28, P<0.001), to 6 months (SMD=1.21, P<0.001), and to 9-12 months (SMD=1.08, P=0.001). The surgery improved physical well-being during the first 3 months (SMD=0.94, P=0.022), improved emotional (SMD=1.19, P=0.004), and functional well-being (SMD=1.08, P=0.005) during the first 6 months, and only improved social/family well-being at month 6 (SMD=0.28, P=0.001).

Conclusions: The surgery improved QoL for patients with spinal metastases, and rapidly improved physical, emotional, and functional well-being; it had minimal effect on social/family well-being. However, choosing the optimal candidate for surgical intervention in the setting of spinal metastases remains paramount: otherwise postoperative morbidity and complications may outbalance the intended benefits of surgery. Future research should report clear definitions of selection criteria and surgical indication and provide stratified QoL results by indication and clinical characteristics such as primary tumor type, preoperative Karnofsky, and Bilsky scores to elucidate the optimal candidate for surgical intervention.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/BSD.0000000000001213DOI Listing
June 2021

Open Versus Endoscopic Surgical Treatment of Posterior Ankle Impingement: A Meta-analysis.

Am J Sports Med 2021 May 28:3635465211004977. Epub 2021 May 28.

FIFA Medical Centre of Excellence Ripoll-dePrado-vanDijk SportClinic Madrid, Spain.

Background: Surgical treatment of symptomatic posterior ankle impingement consists of resection of the bony impediment and/or debridement of soft tissue. Historically, open techniques were used to perform surgery with good results. However, since the introduction of endoscopic techniques, advantages attributed to these techniques are shorter recovery time, fewer complications, and less pain.

Purpose: The primary purpose was to determine whether endoscopic surgery for posterior ankle impingement was superior to open surgery in terms of functional outcome (American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society [AOFAS] score). The secondary aim was to determine differences in return to full activity, patient satisfaction, and complications.

Study Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

Methods: MEDLINE, EMBASE (Classic), and CINAHL databases were searched. Publication characteristics, patient characteristics, surgical techniques, AOFAS scores, time to return to full activity, patient satisfaction, and complication rates were extracted. The AOFAS score was the primary outcome measure. Data were synthesized, and continuous outcome measures (postoperative AOFAS score and time to return to full activity) were pooled using a random-effects inverse variance method. Random-effects meta-analysis of proportions using continuity correction methods was performed to determine the proportion of patients who were satisfied and who experienced complications.

Results: A total of 32 studies were included in this review. No statistically significant difference was found in postoperative AOFAS scores between open surgery (88.0; 95% CI, 82.1-94.4) and endoscopic surgery (94.4; 95% CI, 93.1-95.7). There was no difference in the proportion of patients who rated their satisfaction as good or excellent, 0.91 (95% CI, 0.86-0.96) versus 0.86 (95% CI, 0.79-0.94), respectively. No significant difference in time to return to activity was found, 10.8 weeks (95% CI, 7.4-15.9 weeks) versus 8.9 weeks (95% CI, 7.6-10.4 weeks), respectively. Pooled proportions of patients with postoperative complications were 0.15 (95% CI, 0.11-0.19) for open surgery versus 0.08 (95% CI, 0.05-0.14) for endoscopic surgery. Without the poor-quality studies, this difference was statistically significant for both total and minor complications, 0.24 (95% CI, 0.14-0.35) versus 0.02 (95% CI, 0.00-0.06) and 0.14 (95% CI, 0.09-0.20) versus 0.03 (95% CI, 0.01-0.05), respectively.

Conclusion: We found no statistically significant difference in postoperative AOFAS scores, patient satisfaction, and return to preinjury level of activity between open and endoscopic techniques. The proportion of patients who experienced a minor complication was significantly lower with endoscopic treatment when studies of poor methodological quality were excluded.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/03635465211004977DOI Listing
May 2021

Validation of Dutch Obstetric Telephone Triage System: A Prospective Validation Study.

Risk Manag Healthc Policy 2021 10;14:1907-1915. Epub 2021 May 10.

Department of Tranzo, Tilburg School of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Tilburg University, Tilburg, the Netherlands.

Objective And Purpose: A triage system that prioritizes care according to medical urgency has a favorable effect on safety and efficiency of emergency care. The Dutch obstetric telephone triage system is comparable to physical triage systems. It consists of five urgency levels: resuscitation and life threatening (U1), emergency (U2), urgent (U3), non-urgent (U4) and self-care advice (U5). The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic and external validity of the Dutch obstetric telephone triage system in obstetric emergency care.

Patients And Methods: The validity of the Dutch obstetric telephone triage system was studied in a prospective observational study in four hospitals. Diagnostic validity of usual care was determined by comparing the assigned urgency level of the Dutch obstetric telephone triage system with a reference standard. This reference standard was obtained by face-to-face clinical assessment in hospital following telephone triage. Clinical follow-up after assessment was also recorded. For statistical analyses, urgency levels were dichotomized into high urgency (U1, U2) and intermediate urgency (U3, U4). Self-care advice (U5) could not be studied because these patients were not referred to hospital.

Results: In total, 983 cases (U1-U4) across the four hospitals were included, 625 (64%) cases were categorized as high urgency and 358 (36%) as intermediate urgency. The Dutch obstetric telephone triage system's urgency level agreed with the reference standard in 53% (n=525; 95% CI 50-57%). According to the reference standard the Dutch obstetric telephone triage system had undertriage in 16% (n=160) and overtriage in 30% (n=298) of the cases. Sensitivity for high urgency was 76% (95% CI 72-80), specificity 49% (95% CI 44-53). Positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 60% (95% CI 56-63) and 67% (95% CI 62-72), respectively. After clinical assessment, urgent care was needed in 8.7% (n=31) of the intermediate-urgency cases, none of these cases were life threatening situations.

Conclusion: DOTTS shows an acceptable diagnostic validity with room for improvement.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/RMHP.S306390DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8121677PMC
May 2021

JISAKOS is now indexed in MEDLINE/PubMed.

Authors:
C Niek van Dijk

J ISAKOS 2021 May;6(3):125

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam, Netherlands

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jisakos-2021-000643DOI Listing
May 2021