Publications by authors named "C Motegi"

8 Publications

Distinguishing coagulase-negative Staphylococcus bacteremia from contamination using blood-culture positive bottle detection pattern and time to positivity.

J Infect Chemother 2020 Jul 2;26(7):672-675. Epub 2020 Mar 2.

Central Laboratory, Teikyo University Mizonokuchi Hospital, Kanagawa, Japan; Fourth Department of Internal Medicine, Teikyo University Mizonokuchi Hospital, Kanagawa, Japan.

Aim: Detection of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus in blood culture may be a result of either bacteremia or contamination. This often leads to diagnostic uncertainly. Our objective was to develop a method for differentiating whether a coagulase-negative Staphylococcus sp. positive blood culture represents bacteremia or contamination based on positive bottle detection pattern and time to positivity (TTP).

Methods: This study included 155 and 51 adults with positive blood cultures for Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus hominis, respectively, over a three-year period from 2016 to 2018. Positive blood culture cases were categorized as either bacteremia or contamination based on the clinically available information, and the detection pattern and TTP in each category were investigated.

Results: A total of 57, 92, and 6 S. epidermidis positive blood cultures were categorized as bacteremia, contamination, and undetermined, respectively, whereas 15 and 36 S. hominis positive blood cultures were categorized as bacteremia and contamination, respectively. For positive blood cultures categorized as bacteremia, all four bottles in two sets of blood cultures were positive in 47/47 S. epidermidis and 14/14 S. hominis, respectively, whereas either one bottle in each of two sets or three bottles in two sets were positive in 10/19 S. epidermidis and 1/4 S. hominis, respectively; most of those TTPs were <48 h. Among them, the TTP in catheter-related blood stream infection was <24 h.

Conclusion: Although clinical assessment is crucial to differentiate between bacteremia and contamination, a combination of positive bottle detection pattern and TTP is a valuable diagnostic auxiliary tool.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jiac.2020.02.004DOI Listing
July 2020

Effects of Postprandial Body Position on Gastrointestinal Motility, the Autonomic Nervous System and Subjective Comfort.

Acta Med Okayama 2017 Dec;71(6):485-491

Department of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health and Welfare Science, Okayama Prefectural University, Soja, Okayama 719-1197, Japan.

We examined postprandial body positions' effects on gastrointestinal motility, the autonomic nervous system and subjective comfort, i.e., whether lowering the head after a meal is beneficial for gastrointestinal motility and the prevention of pressure ulcer. We examined 10 healthy subjects and compared 3 body positions: (1) Seated upright. (2) Lying on a bed with the head at 60° and knees up by 20° (60° position). (3) Identical to (2) until post-meal; the head was then lowered to 30° (60°-30° position). Gastrointestinal motility was assessed as gastrointestinal sounds measured by sound-editing software. Digital plethysmography assessed autonomic nerve function as heart rate variability. The pressure ulcer risk was estimated as subjective comfort/discomfort using a visual analog scale. Gastrointestinal sounds increased post-meal. The 60°-30° position showed the highest number of sounds and longest cumulative sound duration. Post-meal, sympathetic activation was suggested in the 60° position, whereas vagal activity was relatively preserved in the 60°-30° position. The 60°-30° position was the most comfortable, and the 60° position was least comfortable. Lowering the head after a meal is beneficial to augment gastrointestinal motility and decrease the pressure ulcer risk. The 60° head-up position increases the pressure ulcer risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.18926/AMO/55585DOI Listing
December 2017

Colonization and release processes of viruses and prokaryotes on artificial marine macroaggregates.

FEMS Microbiol Lett 2016 Jan 13;363(1):fnv216. Epub 2015 Nov 13.

CNRS, UMR 7093, LOV, Observatoire Océanologique, 06230 Villefranche-sur-Mer, France Sorbonne Universités, UPMC, Université Paris 06, UMR 7093, LOV, Observatoire Océanologique, 06230 Villefranche-sur-Mer, France Aix Marseille Université, CNRS/INSU, Université de Toulon, IRD, Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography (MIO) UM 110, 13288, Marseille, France.

Marine organic aggregates are sites of high of viral accumulation; however, still little is known about their colonization processes and interactions with their local bacterial hosts. By taking advantage of a novel approach (paramagnetic functionalized microsphere method) to create and incubate artificial macroaggregates, we examined the small-scale movements of viruses and bacteria between such marine snow particles and the surrounding water. The examination of the codynamics of both free-living and attached viral and bacterial abundance, over 12 hours of incubation in virus-free water, suggests that aggregates are rather comparable to viral factories than to viral traps where a significant part of the virions production might be locally diverted to the water column. Also, the near-zero proportion of lysogenized cells measured in aggregates after mitomycin-C induction seems to indicate that lysogeny is not a prominent viral reproduction pathway in organic aggregates where most viruses might rather be virulent. Finally, we hypothesize that, contrary to bacteria, which can use both strong attachment and detachment from aggregates (two-way motion of bacteria), the adsorption of planktonic viruses appears to be numerically negligible compared to their massive export from the aggregates into the water column (one-way motion of viruses).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/femsle/fnv216DOI Listing
January 2016

Interactive effects of viral and bacterial production on marine bacterial diversity.

PLoS One 2013 7;8(11):e76800. Epub 2013 Nov 7.

Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba, Japan ; Center for Ecological Research, Kyoto University, Otsu, Shiga, Japan ; Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Laboratoire d'Océanographie de Villefranche, Villefranche-sur-Mer, France ; CNRS, Laboratoire d'Océanographie de Villefranche, Villefranche-sur-Mer, France.

A general model of species diversity predicts that the latter is maximized when productivity and disturbance are balanced. Based on this model, we hypothesized that the response of bacterial diversity to the ratio of viral to bacterial production (VP/BP) would be dome-shaped. In order to test this hypothesis, we obtained data on changes in bacterial communities (determined by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism of 16S rRNA gene) along a wide VP/BP gradient (more than two orders of magnitude), using seawater incubations from NW Mediterranean surface waters, i.e., control and treatments with additions of phosphate, viruses, or both. In December, one dominant Operational Taxonomic Unit accounted for the major fraction of total amplified DNA in the phosphate addition treatment (75±20%, ± S.D.), but its contribution was low in the phosphate and virus addition treatment (23±19%), indicating that viruses prevented the prevalence of taxa that were competitively superior in phosphate-replete conditions. In contrast, in February, the single taxon predominance in the community was held in the phosphate addition treatment even with addition of viruses. We observed statistically robust dome-shaped response patterns of bacterial diversity to VP/BP, with significantly high bacterial diversity at intermediate VP/BP. This was consistent with our model-based hypothesis, indicating that bacterial production and viral-induced mortality interactively affect bacterial diversity in seawater.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0076800PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3820650PMC
July 2014

A preliminary study on metal and nutrient concentrations in running water systems in southern New Caledonia.

Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 2011 Oct 24;87(4):361-5. Epub 2011 Jul 24.

Laboratoire d'Océanographie de Villefranche, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, UMR 7093, 06230 Villefranche-sur-Mer, France.

Metal and nutrient concentrations were measured in five running water sampling sites of New Caledonia. Metal concentrations were homogeneous (Ni; 22.7-50.6 μg L(-1)) or not (Fe; 37-749 μg L(-1)). Concentrations of Ni, Cr, Fe were high, including high dissolved fractions (up to 47.8, 70.8 and 417 μg L(-1), respectively). Concentrations of anthropogenic metals (Ag, As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Sb, V, Zn) were low (maximum: total Cu, 0.6 μg L(-1)). The contamination of waters is presumably due to soil weathering and mining activities. Metal concentrations and phosphate depletion (<0.04 μmol L(-1)) suggest constrained conditions for the development of aquatic life.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00128-011-0367-zDOI Listing
October 2011
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