Publications by authors named "C M J Potting"

31 Publications

A randomized controlled trial of manual versus powered tooth brushing during haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

Oral Dis 2021 May 8. Epub 2021 May 8.

Department of Dentistry, Radboudumc, Radboud Institute for Health Sciences, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Aim: To compare manual and powered tooth brushing (MT and PT) with respect to patient compliance to brushing frequency advice, plaque removal and severity of oral mucositis (OM) in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) after high-dose chemotherapy.

Materials & Methods: A randomized controlled trial was conducted. Forty-six patients scheduled to receive myeloablative conditioning regimen before autologous HSCT were included and randomly assigned to control (MT, n = 23) or test (PT, n = 23) groups. Starting at day 1 (day of hospital admission for HSCT), brushing frequency (patient recorded diary), plaque scores (Plaque Control Index) and oral mucositis (Oral Mucositis Nursing Index) were recorded daily. Data for days 1 to 17 were analysed using regression analysis and general linear models.

Results: Few patients maintained 4 times per day brushing, but most brushed at least 2 times per day throughout the study. In PT, overall plaque scores were lower by 6.98% (p = .006) as compared to MT. No differences were seen in OM scores between the groups (p = .968). A small but significant positive correlation was found between plaque scores and OM severity: R =0.15 (p < .01).

Conclusions: Powered tooth brushing resulted in lower plaque scores, but was not associated with reduced OM severity. Individual plaque scores were positively related to OM severity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/odi.13899DOI Listing
May 2021

Significant salivary changes in relation to oral mucositis following autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

Bone Marrow Transplant 2021 Jun 8;56(6):1381-1390. Epub 2021 Jan 8.

Radboud Institute for Health Sciences, Department of Hematology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

The aim of this multicentre, longitudinal study was to determine salivary changes in relation to oral mucositis (OM) in multiple myeloma patients following high-dose melphalan and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (ASCT). Unstimulated and stimulated whole-mouth saliva samples (UWS and SWS) were collected before ASCT, 1×/wk during the hospitalisation phase, and 3 and 12 months post-ASCT. During the hospitalisation period OM was scored 3×/wk (WHO system). Flow rate, pH, total protein concentration (Nanodrop), albumin, lactoferrin, neutrophil defensin-1 (HNP1), total IgA and S100A8/A9 (ELISA) were determined. Mixed models were used to evaluate differences between ulcerative (u)OM (≥2 WHO, n = 20) and non-uOM (n = 31) groups. Until 18 days after ASCT, flow rate, pH, total IgA and HNP1 levels decreased in UWS and/or SWS, while log lactoferrin levels were significantly increased (UWS: p = 0.016 95% CI [0.36, 3.58], SWS: p < 0.001 95% CI [1.14, 3.29]). Twelve months post-ASCT, salivary protein levels were similar to baseline except for log total IgA, which was higher (UWS: p < 0.001 95% CI [0.49, 1.29], SWS: p < 0.001 95% CI [0.72, 1.45]). No differences between uOM and non-uOM groups were observed. Changes in salivary proteins indicated an inflammatory reaction in salivary glands coinciding with mucosal and systemic reactions in response to high-dose melphalan.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41409-020-01185-7DOI Listing
June 2021

Systematic review of oral cryotherapy for the management of oral mucositis in cancer patients and clinical practice guidelines.

Support Care Cancer 2020 May 14;28(5):2449-2456. Epub 2019 Dec 14.

Oral Medicine, Eastman Institute for Oral Health, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA.

Purpose: To update the 2013 Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer/International Society of Oral Oncology (MASCC/ISOO) clinical practice guidelines on oral cryotherapy for the management of oral mucositis (OM) caused by cancer therapies.

Methods: A systematic review was conducted by the Mucositis Study Group of MASCC/ISOO. The evidence for each intervention for specific cancer treatment modalities was assigned a level of evidence (LoE). The findings were added to the database used to develop the 2013 MASCC/ISOO clinical practice guidelines. Based on the LoE, the guidelines were set as: recommendation, suggestion, or no guideline possible.

Results: A total of 114 papers were identified: 44 from PubMed and 70 from Web of Science. After abstract triage and merging with the 2013 database, 36 papers were reviewed. The LoE for prevention of OM with oral cryotherapy in patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant using high-dose melphalan conditioning protocols was upgraded, and the guideline changed to recommendation. Additionally, the recommendation for prevention of OM with oral cryotherapy in patients receiving bolus 5-fluorouracil for the treatment of solid tumors was confirmed. No guidelines were possible for other clinical settings.

Conclusions: The evidence supports recommendations for the use of oral cryotherapy for the prevention of OM for either (i) patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant with high-dose melphalan conditioning protocols or (ii) patients receiving bolus 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00520-019-05217-xDOI Listing
May 2020

Microbial changes in relation to oral mucositis in autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients.

Sci Rep 2019 11 15;9(1):16929. Epub 2019 Nov 15.

Department of Preventive Dentistry, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam, University of Amsterdam and Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

The aim of this prospective, two center study was to investigate the dynamics of the microbial changes in relation to the development of ulcerative oral mucositis in autologous SCT (autoSCT) recipients. Fifty-one patients were diagnosed with multiple myeloma and treated with high-dose melphalan followed by autoSCT. They were evaluated before, three times weekly during hospitalization, and three months after autoSCT. At each time point an oral rinse was collected and the presence or absence of ulcerative oral mucositis (UOM) was scored (WHO scale). Oral microbiome was determined by using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing and fungal load by qPCR. Twenty patients (39%) developed UOM. The oral microbiome changed significantly after autoSCT and returned to pre-autoSCT composition after three months. However, changes in microbial diversity and similarity were more pronounced and rapid in patients who developed UOM compared to patients who did not. Already before autoSCT, different taxa discriminated between the 2 groups, suggesting microbially-driven risk factors. Samples with high fungal load (>0.1%) had a significantly different microbial profile from samples without fungi. In conclusion, autoSCT induced significant and reversible changes in the oral microbiome, while patients who did not develop ulcerative oral mucositis had a more resilient microbial ecosystem.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-53073-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6858439PMC
November 2019

Salivary Changes before and after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Systematic Review.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2019 06 30;25(6):1055-1061. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Department of Hematology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Severe oral problems, including oral mucositis (OM) and xerostomia, often occur after conditioning therapy for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Saliva plays a major role in protecting the oral mucosa and teeth. Alterations in salivary flow rate or salivary components resulting in decreased salivary defence mechanisms may affect oral/mucosal health and may influence the severity of OM. A systematic review was conducted to assess the current scientific knowledge on changes in salivary function and composition before and after HSCT. All English or Dutch articles examining salivary flow rate or salivary components before and after HSCT were included after title/abstract selection by 2 independent reviewers (weighted κ = .91). After quality assessment and exclusion of all research groups with both children age <14 years and adults, 33 articles were included for data analysis. Overall, the salivary flow rate was decreased at several days and months after HSCT. Although several salivary components were studied, most components were examined in only 1 or 2 studies with different patient populations or at different time points after HSCT. At 7 days after HSCT, albumin and proinflammatory cytokines were increased, whereas secretory IgA and components of the salivary antioxidant system were decreased. Secretory IgA levels were still reduced at 1 month after HSCT but returned to pre-HSCT values at 6 months after HSCT. Lactoferrin, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor, and β-microglobulin levels were increased at 6 months after HSCT. Our findings show that changes in saliva reflect an inflammatory response occurring immediately after HSCT, followed by evidence of increased salivary antimicrobial defense mechanisms by 6 months after HSCT.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2019.01.026DOI Listing
June 2019