Publications by authors named "C Lutz"

549 Publications

The Mutant Mouse Resource and Research Center (MMRRC): the NIH-supported National Public Repository and Distribution Archive of Mutant Mouse Models in the USA.

Mamm Genome 2021 Jul 27. Epub 2021 Jul 27.

Mouse Biology Program, University of California, Davis, CA, USA.

The Mutant Mouse Resource and Research Center (MMRRC) Program is the pre-eminent public national mutant mouse repository and distribution archive in the USA, serving as a national resource of mutant mice available to the global scientific community for biomedical research. Established more than two decades ago with grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the MMRRC Program supports a Consortium of regionally distributed and dedicated vivaria, laboratories, and offices (Centers) and an Informatics Coordination and Service Center (ICSC) at three academic teaching and research universities and one non-profit genetic research institution. The MMRRC Program accepts the submission of unique, scientifically rigorous, and experimentally valuable genetically altered and other mouse models donated by academic and commercial scientists and organizations for deposition, maintenance, preservation, and dissemination to scientists upon request. The four Centers maintain an archive of nearly 60,000 mutant alleles as live mice, frozen germplasm, and/or embryonic stem (ES) cells. Since its inception, the Centers have fulfilled 13,184 orders for mutant mouse models from 9591 scientists at 6626 institutions around the globe. Centers also provide numerous services that facilitate using mutant mouse models obtained from the MMRRC, including genetic assays, microbiome analysis, analytical phenotyping and pathology, cryorecovery, mouse husbandry, infectious disease surveillance and diagnosis, and disease modeling. The ICSC coordinates activities between the Centers, manages the website (mmrrc.org) and online catalog, and conducts communication, outreach, and education to the research community. Centers preserve, secure, and protect mutant mouse lines in perpetuity, promote rigor and reproducibility in scientific experiments using mice, provide experiential training and consultation in the responsible use of mice in research, and pursue cutting edge technologies to advance biomedical studies using mice to improve human health. Researchers benefit from an expansive list of well-defined mouse models of disease that meet the highest standards of rigor and reproducibility, while donating investigators benefit by having their mouse lines preserved, protected, and distributed in compliance with NIH policies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00335-021-09894-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8314026PMC
July 2021

Room for Improvement: The Trephination Procedure for Pediatric Patients with Pilonidal Disease.

J Surg Res 2021 Jul 12;267:605-611. Epub 2021 Jul 12.

Department of Pediatric Surgery, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH; The Center for Surgical Outcomes Research, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH. Electronic address:

Background: Pilonidal disease is common amongst adolescent males and females and often leads to recurrent symptoms and life-altering morbidity. The traditional surgical approach includes wide excision of the involved area and carries a high rate of postoperative morbidity. A minimally invasive surgical approach using trephines was described by Gips in 2008 and has since been widely adopted by many surgeons. The aim of this study was to explore outcomes of the trephination procedure for pediatric and adolescent patients by evaluating postoperative wound healing and disease recurrence.

Materials And Methods: A retrospective cohort study for patients that underwent the trephination procedure as part of standard of care for the treatment of pilonidal disease from November 1, 2019-November 1, 2020 was performed. Patient demographics, presenting characteristics, and previous treatment history were identified. Outcome measures included healing time, recurrent disease, and need for reoperation.

Results: A total of 19 patients underwent the trephination procedure at a mean age of 16.4 years of age. An average of 3.8 pits were excised and there were no reported intraoperative complications. Following trephination, 26.3% of patients were healed at 30-day's, with just over 40% showing complete healing by 6-months. The recurrence rate was 16.1% at 6-months and approximately 15% of patients required a second surgery.

Conclusion: Early results for trephination at our institution show a high rate of healing complications and frequent reoperation. Future research is needed to establish the role of the trephination procedure in the context of defining the best practices for treating this challenging disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jss.2021.06.010DOI Listing
July 2021

Selection of Human Cytomegalovirus Mutants with Resistance against PDGFRα-Derived Entry Inhibitors.

Viruses 2021 Jun 8;13(6). Epub 2021 Jun 8.

Institute for Virology, Ulm University Medical Center, 89081 Ulm, Germany.

The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infects fibroblasts via an interaction of its envelope glycoprotein gO with the cellular platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRα), and soluble derivatives of this receptor can inhibit viral entry. We aimed to select mutants with resistance against PDGFRα-Fc and the PDGFRα-derived peptides GT40 and IK40 to gain insight into the underlying mechanisms and determine the genetic barrier to resistance. An error-prone variant of strain AD169 was propagated in the presence of inhibitors, cell cultures were monitored weekly for signs of increased viral growth, and selected viruses were tested regarding their sensitivity to the inhibitor. Resistant virus was analyzed by DNA sequencing, candidate mutations were transferred into AD169 clone pHB5 by seamless mutagenesis, and reconstituted virus was again tested for loss of sensitivity by dose-response analyses. An S48Y mutation in gO was identified that conferred a three-fold loss of sensitivity against PDGFRα-Fc, a combination of mutations in gO, gH, gB and gN reduced sensitivity to GT40 by factor 4, and no loss of sensitivity occurred with IK40. The resistance-conferring mutations support the notion that PDGFRα-Fc and GT40 perturb the interaction of gO with its receptor, but the relatively weak effect indicates a high genetic barrier to resistance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/v13061094DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8229732PMC
June 2021

Effect of Pregnancy and Age on Alopecia in Adult Female Baboons ( spp).

Authors:
Corrine K Lutz

J Am Assoc Lab Anim Sci 2021 Jul 30;60(4):484-488. Epub 2021 Jun 30.

Southwest National Primate Research Center, Texas Biomedical Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas;, Email:

Alopecia occurs frequently in captive populations of nonhuman primates. Because multiple factors can play a role in alopecia, a better understanding of its etiology will help identify potential welfare concerns. The purpose of this study was to investigate risk factors for alopecia in a breeding colony of baboons with a focus on pregnancy and age. Alopecia was scored on a scale of 0 (no alopecia) to 5 (severe alopecia) in 253 female baboons during routine physicals. The subjects ranged in age from 4 to 23 y (Mean = 9.6) and were categorized as pregnant ( = 83), nursing ( = 60) or control ( = 110). Resulting alopecia scores were combined into 2 categories (mild = 0 or 1; moderate = 2 or 3); no animals scored a 4 or 5. Significantly more pregnant females had moderate alopecia than did control females. There was no effect of age on alopecia. An unexpected outcome was that among nursing females, more of those with female infants had moderate alopecia than did those with male infants. The impact of the infant's sex on alopecia may be due to sex differences in maternal contact or maternal investment. This information adds to our understanding of alopecia risk factors in captive nonhuman primates.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.30802/AALAS-JAALAS-20-000156DOI Listing
July 2021

Recognizing the Benefit of Telemedicine Before and After COVID-19: A Survey of Pediatric Surgery Providers.

J Surg Res 2021 May 24;267:274-283. Epub 2021 May 24.

Department of Pediatric Surgery, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio. Electronic address:

Background: Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, the use of telemedicine to evaluate pediatric surgery patients was uncommon. Due in part to restrictions imposed to mitigate the spread of the virus, the use of telemedicine within pediatric surgery has significantly expanded.

Methods: Prior to the use of telemedicine within surgery divisions at our institution, pediatric surgeons were surveyed to determine their perspectives on the use of telemedicine. Following the expanded use of telemedicine in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, a follow up survey was distributed to determine the impact of telemedicine and the perceived benefits and barriers of continuing its use going forward.

Results: The pre-COVID survey was completed by 37 surgeons and the post-COVID survey by 36 surgeons and advanced practice providers across 10 pediatric surgical divisions. General surgeons were the most represented division for both the pre- (25%) and post-COVID (33.3%) survey. Less than 25% of providers reported use of telemedicine at any point in their career prior to COVID-19; but following the expanded use of telemedicine 95% of respondents reported interest in continuing its use. After expansion, 25% of respondents were concerned with the possibility of inaccurate diagnoses when using telemedicine compared to nearly 50% prior to expanded use.

Conclusion: Following the expanded use of telemedicine within pediatric surgery, there was a decrease in the concern for inaccurate diagnoses and a near uniform desire to continue its use. Going forward, it will be imperative for pediatric surgeons to take an active role in creating a process for implementing telemedicine that best fits their needs and the needs of their patients and patients' families.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jss.2021.05.019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8141788PMC
May 2021
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