Publications by authors named "C L Cao"

4,066 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Age-Related Differences in Acute Aortic Dissection.

J Vasc Surg 2021 Sep 22. Epub 2021 Sep 22.

Objective: This study aimed to investigate differences in clinical characteristics, treatments and outcomes of patients with acute aortic dissection (AAD) at different age groups.

Methods: This single-center retrospective study was conducted from August 2014 to August 2020. All patients were divided into three groups: younger than 45 years (young group), 45 to 59 years (middle-aged group), and older than 59 years (elderly group). Type A (TAAD) and type B aortic dissection (TBAD) were evaluated separately using the latest definitions.

Results: The mean age of onset was 52.4 years in a cohort of 602 patients. The young group included a large proportion of men (86%). Body mass index and body surface area were higher in the young group. The proportion of non-true lumen blood supply of branches on the abdominal aorta in the young group (27% - 55%) was higher than others. In the young group, the distal extent of the dissection in 84% of TAAD and 89% of TBAD exceeded the abdominal aortic branch cluster (AABC), compared to 36% of TAAD and 58% of TBAD in the elderly group. According to the multivariate analysis, age < 45 years (odds ratio = 5.15, P < 0.001) and D-dimer level (odds ratio = 1.05, P = 0.001) were risk factors for intimal flap tear exceeding the AABC. The proportion of visceral and lower limb malperfusion increased from 4.8% to 36.9% as the intimal flap tear exceeded the AABC.

Conclusions: Compared to middle-aged and elderly patients, young patients with AAD had two characteristics, one was obesity, and the other was that the intimal flap exceeded the branches of the aorta frequently, which resulted in a higher proportion of non-true lumen blood supply, increased visceral and lower limb malperfusion, and an increase in potential associated risks.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvs.2021.08.086DOI Listing
September 2021

Comparison of accuracy and safety between robot-assisted and conventional fluoroscope assisted placement of pedicle screws in thoracolumbar spine: A meta-analysis.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2021 Sep;100(38):e27282

Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei, China.

Objective: The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to explore the screw positioning accuracy, complications related to pedicle screw implantation, revision rate and radiation exposure between robot screw placement and traditional fluoroscopic screw placement.

Methods: We searched several databases, including CNKI, Wanfang database, cqvip datebase, PubMed, Cochrane library and EMBASE, to identify articles that might meet the criteria. Meta-analysis was performed using Revman 5.3 software.

Results: A total of 13 randomized controlled trial were included. The results showed that the pedicle screw accuracy of the robot assisted group was significantly better than that of the conventional freehand (FH) group (OR = 3.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] [2.75,4.45], P < .0001). There was no significant difference in the complications caused by pedicle screw implantation between the robot-assisted group and the conventional FH group [OR = 0.39, 95%CI (0.10,1.48), P = .17]. The rate of facet joint invasion in the robot-assisted group was significantly lower than that in the conventional FH group (OR = 0.06, 95%CI [0.01,0.29], P = .0006). The revision rate in the robot-assisted group was significantly lower than that in the conventional FH group (OR = 0.19, 95%CI [0.05,0.71], P = 0.0.01). There was no significant difference in the average radiation of pedicle screws implantation between the robot-assisted group and the conventional FH (mean difference = -7.94, 95%CI [-20.18,4.30], P = .20).

Conclusion: The robot-assisted group was significantly better than the conventional FH in the accuracy of pedicle screw placement and facet joint invasion rate and revision rate. There was no significant difference in the complication and fluoroscopy time between the two groups.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000027282DOI Listing
September 2021

A 3D-Bioprinted Multiple Myeloma Model.

Adv Healthc Mater 2021 Sep 23:e2100884. Epub 2021 Sep 23.

Division of Engineering in Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA, 02139, USA.

Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignancy of plasma cells accounting for ≈12% of hematological malignancies. In this study, the fabrication of a high-content in vitro MM model using a coaxial extrusion bioprinting method is reported, allowing formation of a human bone marrow-like microenvironment featuring an outer mineral-containing sheath and the inner soft hydrogel-based core. MM cells are mono-cultured or co-cultured with HS5 stromal cells that can release interleukin-6 (IL-6), where the cells show superior behaviors and responses to bortezomib in 3D models than in the planar cultures. Tocilizumab, a recombinant humanized anti-IL-6 receptor (IL-6R), is investigated for its efficacy to enhance the chemosensitivity of bortezomib on MM cells cultured in the 3D model by inhibiting IL-6R. More excitingly, in a proof-of-concept demonstration, it is revealed that patient-derived MM cells can be maintained in 3D-bioprinted microenvironment with decent viability for up to 7 days evaluated, whereas they completely die off in planar culture as soon as 5 days. In conclusion, a 3D-bioprinted MM model is fabricated to emulate some characteristics of the human bone marrow to promote growth and proliferation of the encapsulated MM cells, providing new insights for MM modeling, drug development, and personalized therapy in the future.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adhm.202100884DOI Listing
September 2021

Altered attention network in paratroopers exposed to repetitive subconcussion: evidence based on behavioral and ERP results.

J Neurotrauma 2021 Sep 22. Epub 2021 Sep 22.

The General Hospital of Chinese PLA Central Theater Command, 627 Wuluo road,Wuhan, China, Wuhan, China, 430000;

Cognitive impairment caused by repetitive subconcussion has been received increasing attention in recent years. While the dysfunction of attention has been confirmed by neuropsychological research using scales, there is no event-related potentials (ERPs) research. Attention network (ANT) has been widely used to evaluate the three separate components of attention processing (alerting, orienting, and executive control). Twenty-seven paratroopers exposed to repetitive subconcussion (subconcussion group) and twenty-five matched health controls participants (HCs group) were enrolled, and all of them performed the ANT test while continuous scalp electroencephalography (EEG) data were recorded. On the behavioral performance level, subconcussion group showed a slower task response, especially significant slower reaction time in the alerting. Concerning ERP results, reduction amplitudes of cue-N1 in alerting network were observed, indicating that this group was less able to make efficient use of cues and maintain an alerting state for incoming information. For orienting network, no difference in the N1 amplitude was observed between the two groups. Moreover, there was a reduced P3 amplitude in executive control network in subconcussion group compared with HCs group, suggesting that the dysfunction of attentional resource allocation and inhibition control in the former group. This study is, to our knowledge, the first analysis of the altered attention network caused by repetitive subconcussion from the perspectives of behavioral and neuropsychology levels. These results preliminary revealed the possible damage of alerting and executive control networks and provided a reference for further research on subconcussion cognitive impairment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/neu.2021.0253DOI Listing
September 2021

Elevated Circulating Levels of Glycoprotein Non-Metastatic Melanoma Protein B as a Predictor of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

Clin Lab 2021 Sep;67(9)

Background: The current study aims to investigate the differences of glycoprotein non-metastatic melanoma protein B (GPNMB) levels between gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) women and normal blood glucose women during pregnancy to provide the basis for early intervention and treatment of GDM.

Methods: The level of GPNMB was detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Pearson's correlation assay was performed to analyze the correlation between serum GPNMB and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) or hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was carried out to analyze the diagnostic value of serum GPNMB.

Results: Our data showed that the serum GPNMB level in GDM group was higher than that in normal blood glucose group at 5 - 12 weeks, 13 - 23 weeks, and 24 - 28 weeks of gestation, but there was no significant difference at 29 - 37 weeks of gestation. Meanwhile, the total level of serum GPNMB in GDM group was significantly higher than that in normal blood glucose group. Further study indicated that serum GPNMB positively correlated with FPG (r = 0.562, p < 0.0001) or HbA1c (r = 0.652, p < 0.0001). ROC analysis showed that serum GPNMB level at 13 - 23 weeks of gestation had a good predictive effect on predicting GDM at 24 weeks of gestation and beyond. When the cutoff value of serum GPNMB level was 2.46 µg/L, the sensitivity and specificity were 80% and 72%, respectively.

Conclusions: The serum GPNMB level at 13 - 23 weeks of gestation is an independent risk factor for GDM in 24 weeks and beyond, and early inhibition with GPNMB may provide a preventive measure in GDM women.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7754/Clin.Lab.2020.201047DOI Listing
September 2021
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