Publications by authors named "C David James"

2,062 Publications

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Glioblastoma as an age-related neurological disorder in adults.

Neurooncol Adv 2021 Jan-Dec;3(1):vdab125. Epub 2021 Sep 4.

Department of Neurological Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

Background: Advanced age is a major risk factor for the development of many diseases including those affecting the central nervous system. Wild-type isocitrate dehydrogenase glioblastoma (IDH GBM) is the most common primary malignant brain cancer and accounts for ≥90% of all adult GBM diagnoses. Patients with IDH GBM have a median age of diagnosis at 68-70 years of age, and increasing age is associated with an increasingly worse prognosis for patients with this type of GBM.

Methods: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results, The Cancer Genome Atlas, and the Chinese Glioma Genome Atlas databases were analyzed for mortality indices. Meta-analysis of 80 clinical trials was evaluated for log hazard ratio for aging to tumor survivorship.

Results: Despite significant advances in the understanding of intratumoral genetic alterations, molecular characteristics of tumor microenvironments, and relationships between tumor molecular characteristics and the use of targeted therapeutics, life expectancy for older adults with GBM has yet to improve.

Conclusions: Based upon the results of our analysis, we propose that age-dependent factors that are yet to be fully elucidated, contribute to IDH GBM patient outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/noajnl/vdab125DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8500689PMC
September 2021

Evidence for the Effectiveness of Feedback from Wearable Inertial Sensors during Work-Related Activities: A Scoping Review.

Sensors (Basel) 2021 Sep 24;21(19). Epub 2021 Sep 24.

School of Health Sciences, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle 2308, Australia.

Wearable inertial sensor technology (WIST) systems provide feedback, aiming to modify aberrant postures and movements. The literature on the effects of feedback from WIST during work or work-related activities has not been previously summarised. This review examines the effectiveness of feedback on upper body kinematics during work or work-related activities, along with the wearability and a quantification of the kinematics of the related device. The Cinahl, Cochrane, Embase, Medline, Scopus, Sportdiscus and Google Scholar databases were searched, including reports from January 2005 to July 2021. The included studies were summarised descriptively and the evidence was assessed. Fourteen included studies demonstrated a 'limited' level of evidence supporting posture and/or movement behaviour improvements using WIST feedback, with no improvements in pain. One study assessed wearability and another two investigated comfort. Studies used tri-axial accelerometers or IMU integration ( = 5 studies). Visual and/or vibrotactile feedback was mostly used. Most studies had a risk of bias, lacked detail for methodological reproducibility and displayed inconsistent reporting of sensor technology, with validation provided only in one study. Thus, we have proposed a minimum 'Technology and Design Checklist' for reporting. Our findings suggest that WIST may improve posture, though not pain; however, the quality of the studies limits the strength of this conclusion. Wearability evaluations are needed for the translation of WIST outcomes. Minimum reporting standards for WIST should be followed to ensure methodological reproducibility.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/s21196377DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8512480PMC
September 2021

INCIDENCE OF HERPES SIMPLEX VIRUS KERATITIS AND OTHER OCULAR DISEASE: GLOBAL REVIEW AND ESTIMATES.

Ophthalmic Epidemiol 2021 Oct 8:1-10. Epub 2021 Oct 8.

Population Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.

Purpose: We aimed to review available data on the incidence of herpes simplex virus (HSV) keratitis and other HSV ocular disease and to estimate the global burden of HSV ocular disease.

Methods: We searched Medline and Embase databases to October 2020 for studies reporting on the incidence of HSV ocular disease. Study quality was evaluated using a four-point checklist. Pooled estimates were applied to 2016 population data to estimate global HSV ocular disease burden. Numbers with uniocular vision impairment (any visual acuity <6/12) were estimated by applying published risks to case numbers.

Results: Fourteen studies had incidence data; seven met our quality criteria. In 2016, an estimated 1.7 (95% confidence interval, 95% CI 1.0-3.0) million people had HSV keratitis, based on a pooled incidence of 24.0 (95% CI 14.0-41.0; N = 2; I = 97.7%) per 100,000 person-years. The majority had epithelial keratitis (pooled incidence 16.1 per 100,000; 95% CI 11.6-22.3; N = 3; I = 92.6%). Available studies were few and limited to the USA and Europe. Data were even more limited for HSV uveitis and retinitis, although these conditions may collectively contribute a further >0.1 million cases. Based on global incidence, some 230,000 people may have newly acquired uniocular vision impairment associated with HSV keratitis in 2016.

Conclusion: Over 1.8 million people may have herpetic eye disease annually. Preventing HSV infection could therefore have an important impact on eye health. Herpetic eye disease burden is likely to have been underestimated, as many settings outside of the USA and Europe have higher HSV-1 prevalence and poorer access to treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09286586.2021.1962919DOI Listing
October 2021

Characterizing Preoperative Expectations for Patients Undergoing Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty.

J Shoulder Elbow Surg 2021 Oct 4. Epub 2021 Oct 4.

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI, USA. Electronic address:

Background: There remains a paucity of information analyzing which factors most influence preoperative expectations for patients undergoing reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA). The purpose of our study was to characterize preoperative patient expectations for those scheduled to undergo RTSA and to determine the impact of demographic factors, shoulder function, and shoulder pain on these preoperative expectations.

Methods: Patients were prospectively recruited into the study if they were scheduled to undergo an elective unilateral primary RTSA for a diagnosis of glenohumeral arthritis. Preoperative patient expectations were evaluated using the Hospital for Special Surgery's Shoulder Surgery Expectation Survey (HSS-ES). Patients also completed the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Shoulder Score, Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Physical Function - Upper Extremity (UE) v2.0 computer adaptive test, PROMIS Pain Interference (PI) v1.1 computer adaptive test, PROMIS Depression (DE) v1.0 computer adaptive test, visual analogue scores, and an itemized satisfaction questionnaire, which paralleled the HSS-ES. Demographic and preoperative shoulder range of motion (ROM) were also recorded.

Results: A total of 107 patients scheduled to undergo RTSA were included into the study. Relief of daytime pain (n = 91, 85%), improvement in self-care (n = 86, 80%), and improvement in shoulder ROM (n = 85, 79%) were most commonly cited as a "very important" expectation. In the item-specific analysis, lower PROMIS UE scores were correlated with greater expectations for ability to reach sideways (p = 0.015) and ability to perform daily activities (p = 0.018). Patients with lower shoulder ROM had greater expectations for improved shoulder ROM (internal rotation, arm at 90 degrees, p = 0.004) and improved ability to perform daily activities (forward elevation, p = 0.038; abduction, p = 0.009). In the cumulative analysis, a greater number of "very important" expectations was associated with African American race (p = 0.013), higher PROMIS PI (r = 0.351, p = 0.004), and lower overall preoperative satisfaction (r = 0.334, p < 0.001).

Conclusion: Patients scheduled to undergo RTSA have the greatest expectations for relief of daytime pain, improvement in self-care, and improvement in shoulder ROM. Patients with limited preoperative ROM have greater expectations for improvement in self-care and ability to perform daily activities in addition to expectations for improvement in shoulder ROM. Greater overall expectations for surgery were not associated with preoperative physical function, but were instead associated with lower preoperative satisfaction and higher PROMIS PI scores.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jse.2021.08.030DOI Listing
October 2021

New Constraints on Tau-Coupled Heavy Neutral Leptons with Masses m_{N}=280-970  MeV.

Phys Rev Lett 2021 Sep;127(12):121801

Fermi National Accelerator Lab, Batavia, Illinois 60510, USA.

A search for heavy neutral leptons has been performed with the ArgoNeuT detector exposed to the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab. We search for the decay signature N→νμ^{+}μ^{-}, considering decays occurring both inside ArgoNeuT and in the upstream cavern. In the data, corresponding to an exposure to 1.25×10^{20}  POT, zero passing events are observed consistent with the expected background. This measurement leads to a new constraint at 90% confidence level on the mixing angle |U_{τN}|^{2} of tau-coupled Dirac heavy neutral leptons with masses m_{N}=280-970  MeV, assuming |U_{eN}|^{2}=|U_{μN}|^{2}=0.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.127.121801DOI Listing
September 2021
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