Publications by authors named "C C Remsen"

46 Publications

Intracellular localization of the particulate methane monooxygenase and methanol dehydrogenase in Methylomicrobium album BG8.

Arch Microbiol 2002 Jul 30;178(1):59-64. Epub 2002 Apr 30.

Department of Biological Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI 53201, USA.

The methanotrophic bacterium Methylomicrobium album BG8 uses methane as a sole source of carbon and energy. This bacterium forms an extensive intracytoplasmic membrane. The first enzymes of the methane oxidation pathway are the membrane-bound particulate methane monooxygenase and the periplasmic methanol dehydrogenase. Immunoelectron microscopy with specific antibodies was used to localize these enzymes to the intracytoplasmic membrane.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00203-002-0426-2DOI Listing
July 2002

Detection of bacteria in environmental samples by direct PCR without DNA extraction.

Biotechniques 2001 Sep;31(3):598, 600, 602-4, passim

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA.

Cultured cells and environmental samples were used directly in PCRs without the isolation of DNA. Serial dilution was used to eliminate the inhibitory effect of materials in natural samples. Primers specific for pmoA, which encodes a subunit of the particulate methane monooxygenase, were used to detect and quantify methanotrophic bacteria by direct most probable number PCR. Phototrophic bacteria were detected in environmental samples by direct PCR with primers specific for pufM, and members of the bacterial domain were detected with primers for 16S rDNA. Direct PCR provides a rapid, simple, and sensitive methodfor detecting and quantifying bacteria in environmental samples. Detection of methanotrophic bacteria can be applied to monitoring bioremediation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2144/01313rr04DOI Listing
September 2001

Isolation of intracytoplasmic membrane from the methanotrophic bacterium Methylomicrobium album BG8.

Curr Microbiol 2000 Feb;40(2):132-4

Department of Biological Sciences and Great Lakes WATER Institute, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI 53201, USA.

Methane-oxidizing bacteria, including Methylomicrobium album BG8, form an intracytoplasmic membrane in addition to the cytoplasmic and outer membranes of the cell envelope. Techniques to isolate the intracytoplasmic membrane of M. album BG8 were developed. An intracytoplasmic membrane fraction was separated from a cell envelope fraction on the basis of sedimentation velocity in sucrose density gradients. Proteins associated with the particulate methane monooxygenase were found in both membrane fractions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s002849910026DOI Listing
February 2000

Detection of methanotrophs in groundwater by PCR.

Appl Environ Microbiol 1999 Feb;65(2):648-51

Department of Biological Sciences and Great Lakes Water Institute, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201, USA.

Methanotrophic bacteria have significant potential for bioremediation, which would require methods for monitoring the presence and activity of these organisms in environmental samples. In this study, PCR was used to detect methanotrophic bacteria. Primers were designed on the basis of a partial sequence of pmoA, which encodes one of the proteins of the particulate methane monooxygenase. Specific amplification of a portion of pmoA was obtained with template DNA isolated from lab strains of methanotrophs. A pmoA product was also obtained by using DNA from groundwater. The identity of the PCR product was confirmed by sequencing or by amplification with a nested primer. Reverse transcriptase PCR detected pmoA mRNA.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC91074PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.65.2.648-651.1999DOI Listing
February 1999

Structure and properties of novel inclusions in Shewanella putrefaciens.

FEMS Microbiol Lett 1996 May;139(1):63-9

Center for Great Lakes Studies, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee 53204, USA.

Cytoplasmic inclusions surrounded by a bilayer membrane were seen in thin sections. negatively stained and freeze-fractured preparations of Shewanella putrefaciens. Cells harvested from the late exponential and early stationary phase showed a higher number of these vesicles than bacteria isolated from early exponential or late stationary phase. Chemical dyes for polyphosphate or poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate did not stain the material enclosed within these vesicles. Elemental analysis of the material indicated that the content was organic in nature and might be a protein. HPLC analysis of the material showed that it was probably not a carbon source, nor an electron acceptor used by S. putrefaciens.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1574-6968.1996.tb08180.xDOI Listing
May 1996
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