Publications by authors named "C Badiu"

95 Publications

Acute surgical abdomen during the COVID-19 pandemic: Clinical and therapeutic challenges.

Exp Ther Med 2021 May 22;21(5):519. Epub 2021 Mar 22.

Third Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, 'Lucian Blaga' University Sibiu, 550169 Sibiu, Romania.

The present study investigated the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the clinical presentation and therapeutic management of acute surgical abdomen. A retrospective study of emergency hospitalizations with a diagnosis of acute surgical abdomen between April and July 2020 vs. a similar period in 2019 was performed. The observation sheets and the operating protocols were analyzed. Between April and July 2020, 50 cases of acute surgical abdomen were hospitalized and treated, compared to 43 cases in the same period last year. The main types of pathology in both groups included: Occlusions (60%, respectively 44.2% in 2019) and peritonitis (32%, respectively 41.8% in 2019). There was an increased rate of patients with colorectal cancers neglected therapeutically or uninvestigated, who presented during the pandemic period with emergencies for complications such as occlusion or tumor perforation (32 vs. 6.97%, P=0.0039). One case, with gastric perforation, was COVID-positive, with no pulmonary symptoms at admission. The number of postoperative infectious complications was lower during the pandemic (2 vs. 13.95%, P=0.0461). As the COVID-19 pandemic appears to be still far from ending, we should learn to adapt our surgical protocols to the new evidence. Oncological patients are a vulnerable group, who were neglected in the first months of the pandemic. SARS-Cov-2 infection may be a cause of abdominal pain and should be taken into account in different diagnoses of acute abdomen in surgical wards. Correct wearing of adequate personal protective equipment (PPE) and respecting strict rules of asepsis and antisepsis are required for preventing in-hospital transmission of infection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/etm.2021.9950DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8014977PMC
May 2021

Safety of Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy for Acute Cholecystitis in the Elderly: A Multivariate Analysis of Risk Factors for Intra and Postoperative Complications.

Medicina (Kaunas) 2021 Mar 2;57(3). Epub 2021 Mar 2.

3rd Department Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, "Lucian Blaga" University Sibiu, 550169 Sibiu, Romania.

This study investigates the impact of age upon the safety and outcomes of laparoscopic cholecystectomy performed for acute cholecystitis, by a multivariate approach. A 2-year retrospective study was performed on 333 patients admitted for acute cholecystitis who underwent emergency cholecystectomy. The patients included in the study group were divided into four age subgroups: A ≤49 years; B: 50-64 years; C: 65-79 years; D ≥80 years. Surgery after 72 h from onset ( = 0.007), severe forms, and higher American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status Classification and Charlson comorbidity index scores ( < 0.001) are well correlated with older age. Both cardiovascular and surgical related complications were significantly higher in patients over 50 years ( = 0.045), which also proved to be a turning point for increasing the rate of conversion and open surgery. However, the comparative incidence did not differ significantly between patients aged from 50-64 years, 65-79 years and over 80 years (6.03%, 9.09% and 5.8%, respectively). Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) was the most frequently used surgical approach in the treatment of acute cholecystitis in all age groups, with better outcomes than open cholecystectomy in terms of decreased overall and postoperative hospital stay, reduced surgery related complications, and the incidence of acute cardiovascular events in the early postoperative period ( < 0.001). The degree of systemic inflammation was the main factor that influenced the adverse outcome of LC in the elderly. Among comorbidities, diabetes was associated with increased surgical and systemic postoperative morbidity, while stroke and chronic renal insufficiency were correlated with a high risk of cardiovascular complications. With adequate perioperative care, the elderly has much to gain from the benefits of a minimally invasive approach, which allows a decreased rate of postoperative complications and a reduced hospital stay.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/medicina57030230DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8002041PMC
March 2021

Impact of lung metastases on overall survival in the phase 3 SELECT study of lenvatinib in patients with radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer.

Eur J Cancer 2021 Apr 19;147:51-57. Epub 2021 Feb 19.

Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA, USA.

Background: Lung metastases may worsen overall survival (OS) in patients with radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (RR-DTC). We investigated (post hoc) the impact of lung metastases on survival in SELECT (a phase 3 study).

Patients And Methods: 392 patients with RR-DTC were randomised 2:1 to lenvatinib 24 mg daily (n = 261) or placebo (n = 131). Placebo-treated patients could crossover to open-label lenvatinib following progression. Patients were grouped by size of baseline lung metastases. Safety/efficacy outcomes, collated by these lung-metastases subgroups, were generated.

Results: Lenvatinib-treated population distributions per baseline lung metastases subgroup were any lung metastases (target/nontarget lesions; n = 226), and by maximum size of target lung lesions ≥1.0 cm (n = 199), ≥1.5 cm (n = 150), ≥2.0 cm (n = 94) and <2.0 cm (n = 105). In patients with any lung metastases, no statistically significant difference in OS was observed between treatment arms (HR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.57-1.01; P = 0.0549). Median OS for lung metastases of ≥1.0 cm was 44.7 months (lenvatinib) versus 33.1 months (placebo) (HR: 0.63; 95% CI: 0.47-0.85; P = 0.0025). OS was significantly prolonged with lenvatinib versus placebo among patients with lung metastases of ≥1.0 cm, ≥1.5 cm, ≥2.0 cm and <2.0 cm; median OS was shorter in the ≥2.0 cm subgroup (lenvatinib: 34.7 months) versus other subgroups (lenvatinib: 44.1-49.2 months). Multivariate analysis demonstrated lenvatinib significantly prolonged OS in patients with lung metastases of ≥1.0 cm after adjustment for baseline characteristics.

Conclusions: Lenvatinib treatment resulted in longer OS in patients with lung metastases of ≥1.0 cm versus placebo (even with the 89% crossover rate). Early initiation of lenvatinib may improve outcomes in patients with RR-DTC and lung metastases of ≥1.0 cm.

Source Study Registration: ClinicalTrials.Gov Identifier: NCT01321554.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejca.2020.12.032DOI Listing
April 2021

Effects of Exogenous Androgens on Platelet Activity and Their Thrombogenic Potential in Supraphysiological Administration: A Literature Review.

J Clin Med 2021 Jan 4;10(1). Epub 2021 Jan 4.

Division of Physiology and Neuroscience, Department of Functional Sciences, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 050474 Bucharest, Romania.

Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS), simply called "androgens", represent the most widespread drugs used to enhance performance and appearance in a sporting environment. High-dosage and/or long-term AAS administration has been associated frequently with significant alterations in the cardiovascular system, some of these with severe endpoints. The induction of a prothrombotic state is probably the most life-threatening consequence, suggested by numerous case reports in AAS-abusing athletes, and by a considerable number of human and animal studies assessing the influence of exogenous androgens on hemostasis. Despite over fifty years of research, data regarding the thrombogenic potential of exogenous androgens are still scarce. The main reason is the limited possibility of conducting human prospective studies. However, human observational studies conducted in athletes or patients, in vitro human studies, and animal experiments have pointed out that androgens in supraphysiological doses induce enhanced platelet activity and thrombopoiesis, leading to increased platelet aggregation. If this tendency overlaps previously existing coagulation and/or fibrinolysis dysfunctions, it may lead to a thrombotic diathesis, which could explain the multitude of thromboembolic events reported in the AAS-abusing population. The influence of androgen excess on the platelet activity and fluid-coagulant balance remains a subject of debate, urging for supplementary studies in order to clarify the effects on hemostasis, and to provide new compelling evidence for their claimed thrombogenic potential.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm10010147DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7795962PMC
January 2021

Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients With Diabetic Foot Ulcer: A Systematic Review.

Int J Low Extrem Wounds 2020 Dec 22:1534734620982237. Epub 2020 Dec 22.

University of Medicine and Pharmacy "Carol Davila" Bucharest, Bucharest, Romania.

This review discusses the evidence on diabetic retinopathy (DR) in patients with diabetic foot ulceration (DFU). A systematic literature review was performed on PubMed, Medline, Springer Nature, and Scopus, following the PRISMA guidelines, using the following terms, individually or in combination: "diabetic foot ulcer" OR "diabetic foot syndrome" OR "DFU" and "diabetic retinopathy." The initial search yielded 648 articles published between 1975 and 2020. After applying exclusion and inclusion criteria, a total of 9 articles were analyzed, assessing the correlations between DR and DFU. In all cases, DR and especially proliferative diabetic retinopathy were significantly higher in the presence of DFU, though the frequency of DR showed large variability (22.5% to 95.6%). There was a significant correlation between advanced stages of DFU and increased frequency of DR and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. On the other hand, there is a risk of accelerated progression of DR in nonhealing DFUs, possibly related to chronic inflammation and associated infection. Hence, patients with DFUs should be monitored by an ophthalmologist, and those with DR should be promptly referred to a specialized diabetic foot clinic.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1534734620982237DOI Listing
December 2020