Publications by authors named "Cédric Lenoble"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Success of Thrombectomy in Management of Ischemic Stroke in Two Patients with SynCardia Total Artificial Heart in Bridge-to-Transplantation.

Bioengineering (Basel) 2021 Sep 19;8(9). Epub 2021 Sep 19.

Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Nantes University Hospital, 44093 Nantes, France.

Introduction: Circulatory assistance from a SynCardia Total Artificial Heart (SynCardia-TAH) is a reliable bridge-to-transplant solution for patients with end-stage biventricular heart failure. Ischemic strokes affect about 10% of patients with a SynCardia-TAH. We report for the first time in the literature two successful thrombectomies to treat the acute phase of ischemic stroke in two patients treated with a SynCardia-TAH in the bridge-to-transplant (BTT).

Case Report: We follow two patients with circulatory support from a SynCardia-TAH in the bridge-to-transplant for terminal biventricular cardiac failure with ischemic stroke during the support period. An early in-hospital diagnosis enables the completion of a mechanical thrombectomy within the first 6 h of the onset of symptoms. There was no intracranial hemorrhagic complication during or after the procedure and the patients fully recovered from neurological deficits, allowing a successful heart transplant.

Conclusion: This case report describes the possibility of treating ischemic strokes under a SynCardia-TAH by mechanical thrombectomy following the same recommendations as for the general population with excellent results and without any hemorrhagic complication during or after the procedure.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering8090126DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8469750PMC
September 2021

Targeting Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy on Metabolic PET- and Immuno-PET-Positive Vertebral Metastases.

Biomedicines 2020 Nov 28;8(12). Epub 2020 Nov 28.

Department of Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine Institut de Cancérologie de l'Ouest (ICO), F-44800 Saint-Herblain, France.

(1) Background: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for vertebral metastases (VM) allows the delivery of high radiation doses to tumors while sparing the spinal cord. We report a new approach to clinical target volume (CTV) delineation based on anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) positron emission tomography (pretargeted immuno-PET; "iPET") in patients with metastatic breast cancer (BC) or medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). (2) Methods: All patients underwent iPET, spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) using F-deoxyglucose (FDG) for BC or F-dihydroxy-phenylalanine (F-DOPA) for MTC. Vertebrae locations and vertebral segments of lesions were recorded and the impact on CTV delineation was evaluated. (3) Results: Forty-six VM eligible for SBRT following iPET were evaluated in eight patients (five BC, three MTC). Eighty-one vertebral segments were detected using MRI, 26 with FDG or F-DOPA PET/CT, and 70 using iPET. iPET was able to detect more lesions than MRI for vertebral bodies (44 vs. 34). iPET-based delineation modified MRI-based CTV in 70% (32/46) of cases. (4) Conclusion: iPET allows a precise mapping of affected VM segments, and adds complementary information to MRI in the definition of candidate volumes for VM SBRT. iPET may facilitate determining target volumes for treatment with stereotactic body radiotherapy in metastatic vertebral disease.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines8120548DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7760481PMC
November 2020

Rare Coding Variants in ANGPTL6 Are Associated with Familial Forms of Intracranial Aneurysm.

Am J Hum Genet 2018 01;102(1):133-141

INSERM, CNRS, UNIV Nantes, l'institut du thorax, 44007 Nantes, France; CHU Nantes, l'institut du thorax, 44093 Nantes, France. Electronic address:

Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) are acquired cerebrovascular abnormalities characterized by localized dilation and wall thinning in intracranial arteries, possibly leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage and severe outcome in case of rupture. Here, we identified one rare nonsense variant (c.1378A>T) in the last exon of ANGPTL6 (Angiopoietin-Like 6)-which encodes a circulating pro-angiogenic factor mainly secreted from the liver-shared by the four tested affected members of a large pedigree with multiple IA-affected case subjects. We showed a 50% reduction of ANGPTL6 serum concentration in individuals heterozygous for the c.1378A>T allele (p.Lys460Ter) compared to relatives homozygous for the normal allele, probably due to the non-secretion of the truncated protein produced by the c.1378A>T transcripts. Sequencing ANGPTL6 in a series of 94 additional index case subjects with familial IA identified three other rare coding variants in five case subjects. Overall, we detected a significant enrichment (p = 0.023) in rare coding variants within this gene among the 95 index case subjects with familial IA, compared to a reference population of 404 individuals with French ancestry. Among the 6 recruited families, 12 out of 13 (92%) individuals carrying IA also carry such variants in ANGPTL6, versus 15 out of 41 (37%) unaffected ones. We observed a higher rate of individuals with a history of high blood pressure among affected versus healthy individuals carrying ANGPTL6 variants, suggesting that ANGPTL6 could trigger cerebrovascular lesions when combined with other risk factors such as hypertension. Altogether, our results indicate that rare coding variants in ANGPTL6 are causally related to familial forms of IA.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2017.12.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5778084PMC
January 2018

Is there an inherited anatomical conformation favoring aneurysmal formation of the anterior communicating artery?

J Neurosurg 2017 May 17;126(5):1598-1605. Epub 2016 Jun 17.

Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Hospital Guillaume et René Laennec.

OBJECTIVE The pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for the formation of intracranial aneurysms (IAs) remain only partially elucidated. However, current evidence suggests a genetic component. The purpose of this study was to investigate the specific anatomical variations in the arterial complex that are associated with the presence of anterior communicating artery (ACoA) aneurysms in the familial forms of IAs. METHODS This multicenter study investigated bifurcation IAs in patients who had a sporadic ACoA IA without a family history of IA (SACAA group), in patients who had an ACoA IA with a family history of IA (FACAA group), and in their healthy first-degree relatives (HFDRs). Through the use of MR angiography (MRA) reconstructions, the symmetry of the A segments and the angle between the A and A segments were analyzed on 3D models for each group. These measurements were then compared among the 3 groups. RESULTS Twenty-four patients with SACAA, 24 patients with FACAA, and 20 HFDRs were included in the study. Asymmetrical configuration of the A segments was more frequent in the FACAA group than in the HFDR group (p = 0.002). The aneurysm-side A-A angle was lower in the FACAA group (p = 0.003) and SACAA group (p = 0.007) than in the HFDR group. On the contralateral side, there was no difference in A-A angles between groups. CONCLUSIONS The anatomical shape of the ACoA complex seems to be similarly associated with the presence of ACoA IAs in both the FACAA and SACAA groups. This highlights the role played by hemodynamic constraints in aneurysm formation and questions the hypothesis of the hereditary character of these anatomical shapes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3171/2016.4.JNS153032DOI Listing
May 2017
-->