Publications by authors named "Bryan R Beamer"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Evaluation of a high-efficiency, filter-bank system.

J Occup Environ Hyg 2006 Apr;3(4):204-13; quiz D45

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Division of Respiratory Disease Studies, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA.

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) investigators evaluated filtration efficiencies at three U.S. Postal Service (USPS) facilities. Ventilation and filtration systems (VFSs) had been installed after the 2001 bioterrorist attacks when the USPS unknowingly processed letters laden with B. anthracis spores. The new VFS units included high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and were required by USPS contract specifications to provide an overall filtration efficiency of at least 99.97% for particles between 0.3 microm and 3.0 micro m. The USPS evaluation involved a modification of methodology used to test total filtration system efficiency in agricultural tractor cab enclosures. The modified sampling strategy not only proved effective for monitoring the total filtration system component of VFS performance but also distinguished between filtration systems performing to the high USPS performance criteria and those needing repair or replacement. The results clearly showed the importance of choosing a pair of optical particle counters that have been closely matched immediately prior to testing. The modified methodology is readily adaptable to any workplace wishing to evaluate air filtration systems, including high-efficiency systems.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15459620600584378DOI Listing
April 2006

Evaluation of misting controls to reduce respirable silica exposure for brick cutting.

Ann Occup Hyg 2005 Aug 21;49(6):503-10. Epub 2005 Apr 21.

University of Wisconsin-Stout, PO Box 790, Menomonie, WI 54751, USA.

It is estimated that more than 1.7 million workers in the United States are potentially exposed to respirable crystalline silica, with a large percentage having been exposed to silica concentrations higher than the limits set by current standards and regulations. The purpose of this study is to characterize the use of water-misting engineering controls to reduce exposure to respirable crystalline silica for construction workers engaged in the task of brick cutting. Since data concerning the efficacy of engineering controls collected at worksites is often confounded by factors such as wind, worker skill level, the experiments were conducted in a laboratory environment. A completely enclosed testing chamber housed the brick-cutting saw. Respirable dust concentrations were measured using the Model 3321 Aerodynamic Particle Sizer. Specifically, the laboratory experiment was designed to compare dust suppression through water misting using conventional freely flowing water techniques. Brass atomizing nozzles with three flow rates were used for making this comparison: low (5.0 ml s(-1) or 4.8 gal h(-1)), medium (9.0 ml s(-1) or 8.6 gal h(-1)) and high (18 ml s(-1) or 17.3 gal h(-1)). The flow rate for freely flowing water, using manufacturer-supplied equipment, was 50 ml s(-1) (48 gal h(-1)). The experiment consisted of five replications of five samples each (low-misting, medium-misting, high-misting, freely flowing water and no control). The order of sampling within each replicate was randomized. Estimates of dust reduction showed that low-misting nozzles reduced the respirable mass fraction of dust by about 63%, medium-misting nozzles by about 67%, high-misting nozzles by about 79% and freely flowing water by about 93%. Based on these results, it may be feasible to use misting to control respirable silica dust instead of freely flowing water. This strategy is of practical interest to the construction industry which must frequently limit the amount of water used on construction sites.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/annhyg/mei011DOI Listing
August 2005

Development of evaluation procedures for local exhaust ventilation for United States postal service mail-processing equipment.

J Occup Environ Hyg 2004 Jul;1(7):423-9

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Engineering and Physical Hazards Branch, Division of Applied Research and Technology, Cincinnati, Ohio 45226, USA.

Researchers from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) have conducted several evaluations of local exhaust ventilation (LEV) systems for the United States Postal Service (USPS) since autumn 2001 when (a) terrorist(s) employed the mail system for acts of bioterrorism. As a part of the USPS 2002 Emergency Preparedness Plan, the development and installation of LEV onto USPS mail-processing equipment can reduce future exposures to operators from potentially hazardous contaminants, such as anthrax, which might be emitted during the processing of mail. This article describes how NIOSH field testing led to the development of recommended testing procedures for evaluations of LEV capture efficiency for mail-processing equipment, including tracer gas measurements, smoke release observations, air velocity measurements, and decay-rate testing under access hoods.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15459620490458486DOI Listing
July 2004
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