Publications by authors named "Brusilov Michael"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A unique brain germinal matrix involvement in cytomegalovirus infected fetuses: A retrospective neurosonographic analysis with outcome correlation.

Prenat Diagn 2021 Jan 13. Epub 2021 Jan 13.

OB-GYN Ultrasound Unit, Lis Maternity Hospital, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel.

Objective: To study the clinical significance of brain germinal matrix (GM) changes in cytomegalovirus (CMV) infected fetuses.

Method: This is a retrospective analysis. Group A; isolated GM finding, with or without lenticulostriatal vasculopathy (LSV). Group B; non-isolated lesion. Amniocentesis, urinalysis, postnatal US and developmental assessment, were obtained.

Results: Group A and B included 18 and four fetuses, respectively. In group A, mean fetal age at diagnosis was 34.3 weeks (31-38 weeks). In 15/18 (83.3%), the lesion was bilateral and LSV was present in 8/18 (44.4%). Small cysts appeared inside the lesion in 5/18 (27.7%). MRI was normal in 8/18 (44.4%). Subtle or inconclusive findings were reported in the remaining fetuses. Brain ultrasound was normal in 10/18 (55.5%) of newborns. In the remaining, caudothalamic cyst with or without LSV, or isolated LSV were found. All newborns are developing normally at a mean follow-up age of 33.3 months (+/- 19.6 moths). In group B, all four patients requested for termination of pregnancy.

Conclusion: Fetal CMV infection may cause focal GM changes, frequently accompanied by LSV, late in pregnancy. These changes may be isolated, or as part of a more generalized brain damage. When isolated, favorable prognosis is expected.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pd.5888DOI Listing
January 2021

The early pattern of human corpus callosum development: A transvaginal 3D neurosonographic study.

Prenat Diagn 2020 09 2;40(10):1239-1245. Epub 2020 Jun 2.

OB-GYN Ultrasound Unit, Lis Maternity Hospital, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel.

Objective: To provide an in-vivo description of early corpus callosum (CC) development.

Methods: We reviewed 3D US volumes acquired transvaginally (TVUS) through the anterior fontanelle, between 14 to 17 weeks. The following landmarks were recognized: tela-choroidea (TC), foramina of Moro, early CC and the evolving cavum septi pellucidi. The following measurements were taken: total, anterior and posterior sections, and height of the CC (referenced to the anterior TC border). All measurements were correlated to both the gestational age and the transverse cerebellar diameter (TCD).

Results: Eighty nine volumes were included in the study (mean 15.1 weeks ± 0.84, TCD range, 13.1-18.4 mm) with high inter and intra observer correlation of the measurements. We found high correlation between CC length and height, and TCD. The anterior segment of the CC appear earlier than the posterior one, and growth continues bi-directionally. Initially, the posterior elongation is significantly larger than the anterior one. Association of all CC measurements with TCD remained significant when co-varying for maternal age and fetal sex.

Conclusions: imaging the fetal CC is feasible from 14 weeks by TVUS, by following the suggested insonation approach. The early CC develops bi-directionally, and the posterior elongation is more significant than the anterior one.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pd.5735DOI Listing
September 2020

Subtle findings on fetal brain imaging in CMV infected pregnancies: What is the clinical significance? A retrospective analysis with outcome correlation.

Prenat Diagn 2020 03 24;40(4):447-453. Epub 2020 Feb 24.

OB-GYN Ultrasound Unit, Lis Maternity Hospital, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel.

Objective: To describe the prognosis of subtle findings on fetal brain imaging in pregnant women with primary CMV infection during pregnancy.

Methods: This was a retrospective study. The data included: timing of infection, amniocentesis results, imaging findings, obstetric outcome, and developmental assessment.

Results: For the 27 included patients, the time of infection was: periconception, first, second, third trimesters or unknown in 14.8%, 29.7%, 40.7%, 7.4%, and 7.4%, respectively. Seventy-four percent had only MRI findings; white matter hyperintense T2 signal (HT2) (51.8%), mild ventriculomegaly (18.5%), HT2 and temporal cyst (7.4%), dilated occipital horn (7.4%), Periventricular pseudo cyst (PVPC) with dilated occipital horn (3.7%), isolated PVPC (7.4%), choroid plexus cyst (3.7%). In 26% of fetuses, additional ultrasound findings were observed: Lenticulostriatal vasculopathy (LSV) (11.1%), LSV with PVPC (3.84%), isolated PVPC (3.84%), mild ventriculomegaly (3.84%), and bilateral temporal cysts (3.84%). In 66.6%, the MRI had false-positive findings (due to noninfected neonates). All children are developing normally, and one has a hearing deficit. Postnatal ultrasound (US) was normal in 21/27, with LSV in five, and a resolving subependymal cyst in one patient.

Conclusion: Subtle imaging findings are more common on MRI than US and the prognosis is most likely favorable. Performing amniocentesis will significantly reduce the false-positive rate.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pd.5634DOI Listing
March 2020

Prenatal diagnosis and postnatal outcome of anterior urethral anomalies.

Prenat Diagn 2020 01 26;40(2):191-196. Epub 2019 Nov 26.

Prenatal Diagnostic Unit, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel.

Objectives: Anterior urethral anomalies (AUA) which present as anterior urethral valve, stenosis or atresia, are a rare cause for congenital urinary tract obstruction. We present our AUA prenatal diagnosis case series.

Methods: Fetuses presenting with prenatal findings suggestive for AUA according to postnatal reported clinical and imaging signs (urinary tract dilatation, dilated bladder, enlarged edematous fetal penis, dilatation of the fetal urethra and diverticula) were followed prospectively.

Results: Six fetuses were diagnosed with AUA. Diagnosis was confirmed upon examination of the neonate or the abortus. All cases presented with variable degrees of urinary tract dilatation. Four fetuses who presented with additional congenital anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract (CAKUT) developed intra-uterine or early postnatal renal failure, while two isolated AUA cases have a normal renal outcome.

Conclusions: AUA is a rare diagnosis. However, high index of suspicion and careful sonographic assessment of the male fetal urethra in cases referred for urinary tract dilatation may enable appropriate parent counseling, optimal prenatal surveillance and timed postnatal urological intervention. As in other lower urinary tract obstructions, future renal function seems to correlate with associated CAKUT, therefore close follow up throughout pregnancy and meticulous sonographic assessment is recommended.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pd.5582DOI Listing
January 2020

Ultrasound imaging of the fetal secondary palate: Methodological description of a two-dimensional approach and a case series.

Prenat Diagn 2018 12;38(13):1049-1054

OB-GYN Ultrasound Unit, Lis Maternity Hospital, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel.

Objective: The study aims to describe our two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound approach to visualize the fetal secondary palate and plot its growth curve and to describe and demonstrate its clinical implementation.

Methods: This is a two parts retrospective study. First, we measured the antero-posterior length of the bony secondary palate, from the soft to hard palate interface (SHPI) line to the alveolar ridge, blindly by two operators during routine scans of low-risk fetuses, and plot a longitudinal growth curve. In the second part, we describe four cases of prenatal diagnosis of secondary palate cleft.

Results: Sixty-eight fetuses were included: 14 to 15 weeks (n = 20), 21 to 24 weeks (n = 32), and 29 to 35 weeks (n = 16). The bony secondary palate elongates along gestation from a mean of 5.3 mm (+/-0.46 mm) at 14 to 15 weeks to 15.9 mm (+/-1.7 mm) at 29 to 35 weeks. We found high intraobserver and interobserver correlation between measurements. All four cases diagnosed by this approach were confirmed postnatally.

Conclusions: The SHPI, representing the normally developed secondary bony palate, can be imaged in the fetus by direct 2D ultrasound as early as 14 weeks. A gap within or nonvisualization of the SHPI is highly suggestive for a secondary palate cleft.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pd.5385DOI Listing
December 2018