Publications by authors named "Bruna Meira"

10 Publications

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Long-term effect of apomorphine infusion in advanced Parkinson's disease: a real-life study.

NPJ Parkinsons Dis 2021 Jun 11;7(1):50. Epub 2021 Jun 11.

Neurology Department, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, AP-HP, Paris, France.

Long-term effects of continuous subcutaneous apomorphine infusion (CSAI) on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and predictors of CSAI discontinuation are poorly known. Data from consecutive advanced Parkinson's disease patients treated in routine care were retrospectively collected over 24 months after CSAI initiation, with a focus on the 39-item Parkinson's disease questionnaire (PDQ-39). We determined predictors of CSAI discontinuation and HRQoL improvement using multiple regression analysis. Of the 110 subjects evaluated over a 2-year period, 35% discontinued CSAI. Of those who continued treatment, HRQoL remained stable with a sustained reduction in motor fluctuations. The observed effect on dyskinesias was mild and transient. Of note, patients with preexisting impulse control disorders showed an overall good tolerability. PDQ-39 was the only baseline predictor of HRQoL improvement after 2 years of treatment. The presence of dyskinesias, poorer psychological status, shorter disease duration, male sex, and worse OFF state were predictors of discontinuation. Best candidates for CSAI are patients with: (i) poor baseline HRQoL and (ii) marked motor fluctuations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41531-021-00194-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8196159PMC
June 2021

Double vision and facial palsy.

Pract Neurol 2021 Mar 3. Epub 2021 Mar 3.

Neurology, Hospital de Egas Moniz, Lisbon, Portugal.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/practneurol-2020-002722DOI Listing
March 2021

Polysomnographic predictors of sleep, motor and cognitive dysfunction progression in Parkinson's disease: a longitudinal study.

Sleep Med 2021 01 25;77:205-208. Epub 2020 Jun 25.

Department of Neurology, Hospital de Egas Moniz, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Ocidental, Lisboa, Portugal.

Objective: To assess the predictive value of polysomnographic (PSG) data in the prospective assessment of cognitive, motor, daytime and nighttime sleep dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients.

Methods: PD patients were assessed at baseline with video-PSG and with cognitive (MoCA), Sleep (SCOPA-Sleep Nighttime and Daytime scores) and Motor (UPDRSIII) function scales at both baseline and four years later. Linear regression analysis was used to assess the relation between PSG variables at baseline and change in symptoms scores.

Results: We included a total of 25 patients, 12 with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) (in 8 PSG was inconclusive, due to lack of REM sleep). MoCA scores decreased significantly at follow-up, while SCOPA-Sleep Daytime and SCOPA-Sleep Nighttime and UPDRSIII did not vary. Lower N3 percentage at baseline was significantly associated with MoCA decrease. Higher Periodic Limb Movements in Sleep index (PLMS) and the presence of RBD were significantly associated with SCOPA daytime score increase. Higher global severity of RBD, tonic RSWA and total number of motor events during REM sleep were associated with SCOPA Nighttime score increase.

Conclusions: The present work suggests that PSG data could be useful for predicting PD cognitive and sleep dysfunction progression. Reduced SWS could predict deterioration of cognitive function, while baseline PLMS could be useful to predict worsening of daytime sleep dysfunction. Severity of RBD could be used for estimating nighttime sleep symptoms progression.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sleep.2020.06.020DOI Listing
January 2021

Do dreams tell the future? Dream content as a predictor of cognitive deterioration in Parkinson's disease.

J Sleep Res 2021 06 9;30(3):e13163. Epub 2020 Aug 9.

Department of Neurology, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Ocidental, Hospital de Egas Moniz, Lisboa, Portugal.

Cross-sectional studies suggest a correlation between alterations in dream content reports and executive dysfunction tests in Parkinson's disease (PD), but this has not been assessed in longitudinal studies. Our objective was to assess the predictive value of dream content for progression of cognitive dysfunction in PD. We prospectively addressed all consecutive, non-demented patients with PD attending an outpatient clinic during a 1-year period. Dream reports were collected at baseline by means of a dream diary and analysed according to the Hall and Van de Castle system. Patients were assessed at baseline for rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder, motor stage, mood disorder and psychosis. The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) was applied at baseline and 4 years later. Linear regression analysis was used to the test the relation between each dream index (predictors), demographic and other motor and non-motor variables (covariates), and change in MoCA scores (dependent variable). In all, 58 patients were assessed at both time points and 23 reported at least one dream (range 1-27, total 148). Aggression, physical activities, and negatively toned content predominated in dream reports. The MoCA scores decreased significantly from baseline to follow-up. In the multivariate model, negative emotion index was the strongest predictor of cognitive decline. We found a significant positive association between negative emotions in dreams at baseline and subsequent reduction in MoCA scores. These findings suggest that some dream content in patients with PD could be considered a predictor of cognitive decline, independent of other factors known to influence either dream content or cognitive deterioration.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jsr.13163DOI Listing
June 2021

Can You Hear Your Patient Sleep? Smartphones and Modern Technologies in the Detection of Nocturnal Stridor and MSA Diagnosis.

Mov Disord Clin Pract 2020 Aug 3;7(6):710-712. Epub 2020 Aug 3.

Neurology Department Hospital de Egas Moniz, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Ocidental Lisbon Portugal.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mdc3.13020DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7396856PMC
August 2020

REM sleep behaviour disorder in essential tremor: A polysomnographic study.

J Sleep Res 2021 04 23;30(2):e13050. Epub 2020 Apr 23.

Department of Neurology, Hospital de Egas Moniz, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Ocidental, Lisboa, Portugal.

Our objectives were to assess the prevalence of REM sleep behaviour disorder in patients with Essential Tremor, using video-polysomnography and to compare REM sleep behaviour disorder features in essential tremor with those of patients with alpha-synucleinopathies. Forty-nine patients with essential tremor were screened with the REM Sleep Behaviour Disorder Screening Questionnaire. Patients scoring positive and those with spontaneous complaints of REM sleep behaviour disorder (n = 6) underwent video-polysomnography. The clinical features of essential tremor were compared between patients with and without REM sleep behaviour disorder. Video-polysomnography data were compared between patients who had essential tremor and Parkinson's disease with REM sleep behaviour disorder and those with idiopathic REM sleep behaviour disorder. Fourteen patients (23.5%) screened positive for REM sleep behaviour disorder, confirmed by video-polysomnography in five (11.6%). All patients with essential tremor and REM sleep behaviour disorder had rest tremor, compared with 13 (34.2%) in the group with essential tremor but without REM sleep behaviour disorder (p = .009). In video-polysomnography, patients with essential tremor and REM sleep behaviour disorder were similar to patients with Parkinson's disease with REM sleep behaviour disorder and presented worse sleep dysfunction and lower severity of REM sleep behaviour disorder compared to those with idiopathic REM sleep behaviour disorder. We found a high prevalence of REM sleep behaviour disorder in patients with essential tremor, associated with a predominance of rest tremor. Polysomnography data from patients with essential tremor and REM sleep behaviour disorder were similar to those in patients with Parkinson's disease. This suggests a relation between this subgroup of patients with essential tremor and the alpha-synucleinopathies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jsr.13050DOI Listing
April 2021

Motor and non-motor function predictors of mortality in Parkinson's disease.

J Neural Transm (Vienna) 2019 11 5;126(11):1409-1415. Epub 2019 Aug 5.

Department of Neurology, Hospital de Egas Moniz, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Ocidental, Rua da Junqueira, 126, 1349-019, Lisbon, Portugal.

Doubts persist regarding the influence of Parkinson's disease (PD) on mortality. Our objective was to assess mortality rates in a prospectively followed cohort of PD patients and the impact of motor and non-motor symptoms in survival. 130 consecutive PD patients were followed during a 4-year period or until death. Baseline assessment included motor function (UPDRSIII, Hoehn and Yahr-HY), incapacity (Schwab and England-S&E, UPDRS II), Health-Related quality of life (EuroQol), non-motor symptoms (Non-Motor Symptom Scale-NMSS, MoCA, REM sleep behavior disorder symptoms questionnaire) and comorbidity burden (Charlson Comorbidity Index-CCI). These were used as predictor variables. Standardized mortality rates (SMR) were calculated, comparing with the general population. The association between mortality and predictors was tested with univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression models. Overall and gender-related SMRs were similar to the general population. SMR for pneumonia was five times higher than in the general population. Age, disease duration, CCI, EuroQol, dementia, MoCA, S&E, NMSS Hallucinations, HY, and PIGD motor phenotype were significantly associated with mortality. Adjusting for age, gender and disease duration, S&E remained significantly associated with mortality. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, death was significantly associated with disease duration, CCI and NMSS-mood/cognition scores. PD was not associated with an excess of mortality, but conferred a higher probability of dying from pneumonia. Comorbidity was a major determinant, but disease duration, baseline incapacity, cognition, psychosis, mood complaints and HRQL also contributed significantly to mortality.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00702-019-02055-3DOI Listing
November 2019

Late-onset presentation of POLG1-associated mitochondrial disease.

BMJ Case Rep 2019 Mar 31;12(3). Epub 2019 Mar 31.

Neurology Department, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Ocidental EPE, Lisboa, Portugal.

Mutations in the nuclear POLG1 gene compromise the integrity of mitochondrial DNA and show great allelic and clinical heterogeneity. Among adult POLG1-associated mitochondrial disease, the main clinical feature is chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia. Other related clinical manifestations are sensory or cerebellar ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, myopathy or extrapyramidal symptoms. We report the case of a 72-year-old man who presented with a late onset sensory neuronopathy, chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia, gait ataxia and parkinsonism. Genetic studies showed a compound heterozygosity of known pathogenic mutations in the POLG1 gene (variant T252I/P587 L in cis configuration in allele 1 and variant R807C in allele 2). Late life presentation highlights that mitochondrial disorders should be considered regardless of age of onset of symptoms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2018-228482DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6453401PMC
March 2019

Deep brain stimulation for lesion-related tremors: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Parkinsonism Relat Disord 2018 02 13;47:8-14. Epub 2017 Dec 13.

Neurology Department, Hospital Egas Moniz, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Ocidental, Lisbon, Portugal; CEDOC, Nova Medical School / Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal. Electronic address:

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective treatment for essential tremor or tremor in Parkinson's disease. The effectiveness of DBS in reducing tremors that develop after a structural lesion of the central nervous system (such as Holmes' tremor - HT) has only been addressed in case reports or series. We conducted a systematic review of all published original reports of DBS in central nervous system lesion-related tremor (excluding demyelinating disorders due to their non-static nature). Where available, we extracted data regarding each patient's demographic, tremor and surgical details. Improvement was calculated as a percentage of change in any objective tremor rating scale. We identified 35 publications reporting on 82 patients. The ventral intermedius nucleus(VIM) of the thalamus was the preferred target (63.6%) and 18.2% targeted globus pallidus pars interna(GPi). Median improvement was 77.5% and 71.4% for patients with post-stroke and post-traumatic tremor respectively. Seven subjects (13.5%) had less than 50% improvement. Therapeutic effectiveness was not associated with age, tremor duration, age of onset or follow-up time. A large range of stimulation parameters were used with median voltage, pulse width and frequency values higher for GPi (4.80 V, 105 us, 170 Hz) than for thalamic stimulation (3.0 V, 90 us, 140 Hz). DBS reports for Holmes' and lesional tremors treatment are scarce and highly heterogeneous limiting a proper summary analysis and comparisons. Even facing a probable report bias, a high number of subjects with good long-term tremor control were found. These results should promote the creation of tremor registries before clinical trials.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.parkreldis.2017.12.014DOI Listing
February 2018
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