Publications by authors named "Bruna Greve"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Vaccination of multiple myeloma: Current strategies and future prospects.

Crit Rev Oncol Hematol 2015 Nov 18;96(2):339-54. Epub 2015 Jun 18.

Division of Hematology, Department of General Surgery, Oncology and Pathological Anatomy-University of Messina, Messina, Italy.

Tumor immunotherapy holds great promise in controlling multiple myeloma (MM) and may provide an alternative treatment modality to conventional chemotherapy for MM patients. For this reason, a major area of investigation is the development of cancer vaccines to generate myeloma-specific immunity. Several antigens that are able to induce specific T-cell responses are involved in different critical mechanisms for cell differentiation, inhibition of apoptosis, demethylation and proliferation. Strategies under development include infusion of vaccine-primed and ex vivo expanded/costimulated autologous T cells after high-dose melphalan, genetic engineering of autologous T cells with receptors for myeloma-specific epitopes, administration of dendritic cell/plasma cell fusions and administration expanded marrow-infiltrating lymphocytes. In addition, novel immunomodulatory drugs may synergize with immunotherapies. The task ahead is to evaluate these approaches in appropriate clinical settings, and to couple them with strategies to overcome mechanisms of immunoparesis as a means to induce more robust clinically significant immune responses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.critrevonc.2015.06.003DOI Listing
November 2015

Monoclonal antibodies: potential new therapeutic treatment against multiple myeloma.

Eur J Haematol 2013 Jun 17;90(6):441-68. Epub 2013 Apr 17.

Division of Haematology, University of Messina, Messina, Italy.

Despite recent treatments, such as bortezomib, thalidomide, and lenalidomide, therapy of multiple myeloma (MM) is limited, and MM remains an incurable disease associated with high mortality. The outcome of patients treated with cytotoxic therapy has not been satisfactory. Therefore, new therapies are needed for relapsed MM. A new anticancer strategy is the use of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) that represent the best available combination of tumor cytotoxicity, environmental signal privation, and immune system redirection. Clinical results in patients with relapsed/refractory MM suggest that MoAbs are likely to operate synergistically with traditional therapies (dexamethasone), immune modulators (thalidomide, lenalidomide), and other novel therapies (bortezomib); in addition, MoAbs have shown the ability to overcome resistance to these therapies. It remains to be defined how MoAb therapy can most fruitfully be incorporated into the current therapeutic paradigms that have achieved significant survival earnings in patients with MM. This will require careful consideration of the optimal sequence of treatments and their clinical position as either short-term induction therapy, frontline therapy in patients ineligible for ASCT, or long-term maintenance treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ejh.12107DOI Listing
June 2013

Stevens-Johnson syndrome after lenalidomide therapy for multiple myeloma: a case report and a review of treatment options.

Hematol Oncol 2012 Mar 23;30(1):41-5. Epub 2011 Jun 23.

Division of Haematology, University of Messina, Messina, Italy.

Stevens- Johnson syndrome (SJS) is a severe and life-threatening condition. Although allopurinol, an antihyperuricemia drug, is the drug most commonly associated with SJS, more than 100 different causative drugs have been reported. Among hematologic drugs recently introduced into the market, drugs such as rituximab, imatinib, and bortezomib are reported. Here, we describe a patient with SJS while receiving lenalidomide in combination with prednisolone for treatment-naïve multiple myeloma. Although SJS has been reported rarely as an adverse reaction to Lenalidomide, this drug should be considered in the etiology of SJS, and the increased number of prescriptions of Lenalidomide for the therapy of multiple myeloma has to stress the awareness of its potentially serious side-effects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hon.1000DOI Listing
March 2012