Publications by authors named "Bruce Herdman"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Preventing Interruptions in Health Care After Release From Jail.

J Correct Health Care 2022 Aug 31;28(4):215-219. Epub 2022 May 31.

School of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

The burden of illness, especially mental health and substance abuse, among the incarcerated population is a major factor for recidivism. County jails throughout the United States provide health care disconnected to care given before and after incarceration. Although the mental health issues of incarcerated individuals are well managed during incarceration, they have inadequate medical coverage and medications upon release. In partnership with the Philadelphia Department of Prisons, we launched a new initiative to enroll women into Medicaid before release and set up their first doctor's appointments to ensure continuous access to treatment. This article presents a methodology for connection between health care provided while inside a jail and health care given in the community for people returning to communities after incarceration. We describe a process for establishing and reestablishing health insurance while incarcerated and making first appointments in preparation for discharge from a large urban jail.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/jchc.20.12.0119DOI Listing
August 2022

Comparison of risk-based hepatitis C screening and the true seroprevalence in an urban prison system.

J Urban Health 2015 Apr;92(2):379-86

Philadelphia Department of Public Health, Division of Disease Control, 500 S. Broad St., Philadelphia, PA, 19146, USA,

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the most common blood-borne infection in the USA, though seroprevalence is elevated in certain high-risk groups such as inmates. Correctional facility screening protocols vary from universal testing to opt-in risk-based testing. This project assessed the success of a risk-based HCV screening strategy in the Philadelphia Prison System (PPS) by comparing results from current testing practices during 2011-2012 (Risk-Based Screening Group) to a September 2012 blinded seroprevalence study (Philadelphia Department of Public Health (PDPH) Study Cohort). PPS processed 51,562 inmates in 2011-2012; 2,727 were identified as high-risk and screened for HCV, of whom 57 % tested HCV antibody positive. Twelve percent (n = 154) of the 1,289 inmates in the PDPH Study Cohort were anti-HCV positive. Inmates ≥30 years of age had higher rates of seropositivity in both groups. Since only 5.3 % of the prison population was included in the Risk-Based Screening Group, an additional 4,877 HCV-positive inmates are projected to have not been identified in 2011-2012. Gaps in case identification exist when risk-based testing is utilized by PPS. A more comprehensive screening model such as opt-out universal testing should be considered to identify HCV-positive inmates. Identification of these individuals is an important opportunity to aid underserved high-risk populations and to provide medical care and secondary prevention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11524-015-9945-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4411325PMC
April 2015

Online medication history retrieval.

J Correct Health Care 2015 Jan 26;21(1):82-5. Epub 2014 Nov 26.

Philadelphia Prison System, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

The difficulty of obtaining accurate medication history from inmates at the time of incarceration is daunting. This article summarizes the success of a large urban jail in the use of online data to identify medication history upon incarceration. This article describes the scope of available prescription data, the implementation of online retrieval, system limitations, planned improvements, and suggestions of additional applications of online retrieval services.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1078345814558228DOI Listing
January 2015

Rapid HIV testing in large urban jails.

Am J Public Health 2012 May 8;102 Suppl 2:S184-6. Epub 2012 Mar 8.

Division of Infectious Diseases, The Miriam Hospital/Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI 02906, USA.

HIV prevalence is higher in jails than in the community, yet many jails do not conduct HIV testing. Jails in Baltimore, Maryland; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and the District of Columbia have implemented innovative rapid HIV testing programs. We have summarized the results of these programs, including the numbers of persons tested, rapid and confirmatory HIV test results, and numbers of persons newly diagnosed with HIV. We have described facilitators and challenges of implementation. These programs confirmed that rapid HIV testing in jails was feasible and identified undiagnosed HIV infection. Challenges included limited space to provide confidential rapid HIV testing and rapid turnover of detainees. Implementation required collaboration between local governments, health agencies, and correctional institutions. These programs serve as models for expanding rapid HIV testing in jails.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2011.300514DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3477921PMC
May 2012
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