Publications by authors named "Bronson D Riley"

5 Publications

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Identification of genetic counseling service delivery models in practice: a report from the NSGC Service Delivery Model Task Force.

J Genet Couns 2013 Aug 25;22(4):411-21. Epub 2013 Apr 25.

Cancer Genetics Risk Assessment Program, St. Vincent Hospital, 8301 Harcourt Rd #100, Indianapolis, IN 46260, USA.

Increasing demand for genetic services has resulted in the need to evaluate current service delivery models (SDMs) and consider approaches that improve access to and efficiency of genetic counseling (GC). This study aimed to describe SDMs currently used by the GC community. The NSGC membership was surveyed regarding the use of four SDMs: in-person GC, telephone GC, group GC, and telegenetics GC. Variables related to access and components of use were also surveyed, including: appointment availability, time-per-patient, number of patients seen, billing, and geographic accessiblity. Seven hundred one usable responses were received. Of these, 54.7 % reported using an in-person SDM exclusively. The remainder (45.3 %) reported using multiple SDMs. Telephone, group and telegenetics GC were used often or always by 8.0 %, 3.2 % and 2.2 % of respondents, respectively. Those using an in-person SDM reported the ability to see the highest number of patients per week (p < 0.0001) and were the most likely to bill in some manner (p < 0.0001). Those using telegenetic and telephone GC served patients who lived the furthest away, with 48.3 % and 35.8 %% respectively providing GC to patients who live >4 h away. This study shows that genetic counselors are incorporating SDMs other than traditional in-person genetic counseling, and are utilizing more than one model. These adaptations show a trend toward shorter wait time and shorter length of appointments. Further study is indicated to analyze benefits and limitations of each individual model and factors influencing the choice to adopt particular models into practice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10897-013-9588-0DOI Listing
August 2013

Report from the National Society of Genetic Counselors service delivery model task force: a proposal to define models, components, and modes of referral.

J Genet Couns 2012 Oct 8;21(5):645-51. Epub 2012 May 8.

Cancer Genetics Risk Assessment Program, St. Vincent Hospital, Indianapolis, IN 46260, USA.

The Service Delivery Model Task Force (SDMTF) was appointed in 2009 by the leadership of the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) with a charge to research and assess the capacity of all existing service delivery models to improve access to genetic counseling services in the context of increasing demand for genetic testing and counseling. In approaching this charge, the SDMTF found that there were varying interpretations of what was meant by "service delivery models" and the group held extensive discussions about current practices to arrive at consensus of proposed definitions for current genetic service delivery models, modes of referral and components of service delivery. The major goal of these proposed definitions is to allow for conversations to begin to address the charge to the committee. We propose that current models of service delivery can be defined by: 1) the methods in which genetic counseling services are delivered (In-person, Telephone, Group and Telegenetics), 2) the way they are accessed by patients (Traditional referral, Tandem, Triage, Rescue and Self-referral) and 3) the variable components that depend upon multiple factors unique to each service setting. This report by the SDMTF provides a starting point whereby standardized terminology can be used in future studies that assess the effectiveness of these described models to overcome barriers to access to genetic counseling services.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10897-012-9505-yDOI Listing
October 2012

Essential elements of genetic cancer risk assessment, counseling, and testing: updated recommendations of the National Society of Genetic Counselors.

J Genet Couns 2012 Apr 2;21(2):151-61. Epub 2011 Dec 2.

Southeast Nebraska Cancer Center, Lincoln, NE, USA.

Updated from their original publication in 2004, these cancer genetic counseling recommendations describe the medical, psychosocial, and ethical ramifications of counseling at-risk individuals through genetic cancer risk assessment with or without genetic testing. They were developed by members of the Practice Issues Subcommittee of the National Society of Genetic Counselors Familial Cancer Risk Counseling Special Interest Group. The information contained in this document is derived from extensive review of the current literature on cancer genetic risk assessment and counseling as well as the personal expertise of genetic counselors specializing in cancer genetics. The recommendations are intended to provide information about the process of genetic counseling and risk assessment for hereditary cancer disorders rather than specific information about individual syndromes. Essential components include the intake, cancer risk assessment, genetic testing for an inherited cancer syndrome, informed consent, disclosure of genetic test results, and psychosocial assessment. These recommendations should not be construed as dictating an exclusive course of management, nor does use of such recommendations guarantee a particular outcome. These recommendations do not displace a health care provider's professional judgment based on the clinical circumstances of a client.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10897-011-9462-xDOI Listing
April 2012

Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma (HNPCC) and HNPCC-like families: Problems in diagnosis, surveillance, and management.

Cancer 2004 Jan;100(1):53-64

Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Creighton University School of Medicine, Omaha, Nebraska 68178, USA.

Background: To the authors' knowledge, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma (HNPCC) is the most commonly occurring hereditary disorder that predisposes to colorectal carcinoma (CRC), accounting for approximately 2-7% of all CRC cases diagnosed in the U.S each year. Its diagnosis is wholly dependent on a meticulously obtained family history of cancer of all anatomic sites, with particular attention to the pattern of cancer distribution within the family.

Methods: The objective of the current study was to illustrate various vexing problems that can deter the diagnosis of HNPCC and, ultimately, its management. This was an observational cohort study. Sixteen HNPCC and HNPCC-like families were selected from a large resource of highly extended HNPCC families. High-risk patients were selected from these HNPCC families. An ascertainment bias was imposed by the lack of a population-based data set. Personal interviews and questionnaires were used for data collection.

Results: There was an array of difficulties highlighted by limitations in compliance, lack of a clinical or molecular basis for an HNPCC diagnosis, ambiguous DNA findings, problems in genetic counseling, failure to meet Amsterdam or Bethesda criteria, small families, lack of medical and pathologic documentation, poor cooperation of family members and/or their physicians, cultural barriers, economic stress, frequent patient fear and anxiety, perception of insurance discrimination, and limited patient and/or physician knowledge regarding hereditary cancer.

Conclusions: The diagnosis and management of HNPCC is predicated on physician knowledge of its phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity, in concert with the multifaceted problems that impact on patient compliance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cncr.11912DOI Listing
January 2004

Hereditary breast-ovarian cancer at the bedside: role of the medical oncologist.

J Clin Oncol 2003 Feb;21(4):740-53

Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Creighton University School of Medicine, 2500 California Plaza, Omaha, NE 68178, USA.

Purpose: To provide practical considerations for diagnosing, counseling, and managing patients at high risk for hereditary breast cancer.

Design: We have studied 98 extended hereditary breast cancer (HBC)/hereditary breast-ovarian cancer (HBOC) families with BRCA1/2 germline mutations. From these families, 1,315 individuals were counseled and sampled for DNA testing. Herein, 716 of these individuals received their DNA test results in concert with genetic counseling. Several challenging pedigrees were selected from Creighton University's hereditary cancer family registry, as well as one family from Evanston/Northwestern Healthcare, to be discussed in this present report.

Results: Many obstacles were identified in diagnosis, counseling, and managing patients at high risk for HBC/HBOC. These obstacles were early noncancer death of key relatives, perception of insurance or employment discrimination, fear, anxiety, apprehension, reduced gene penetrance, and poor compliance. Other important issues such as physician culpability and malpractice implications for failure to collect or act on the cancer family history were identified.

Conclusion: When clinical gene testing emerged for BRCA1 and BRCA2, little was known about the efficacy of medical interventions. Potential barriers to uptake of testing were largely unexplored. Identification and referral of high-risk patients and families to genetic counseling can greatly enhance the care of the population at the highest risk for cancer. However, because premonitory physical stigmata are absent in most of these syndromes, an HBOC diagnosis may be missed unless a careful family history of cancer of the breast, ovary, or several integrally associated cancers is obtained.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2003.05.096DOI Listing
February 2003