Publications by authors named "Bridgid Lai Fui Chin"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A Molecular Simulation Study of Silica/Polysulfone Mixed Matrix Membrane for Mixed Gas Separation.

Polymers (Basel) 2021 Jul 1;13(13). Epub 2021 Jul 1.

Department of Chemical Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800, Australia.

Polysulfone-based mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) incorporated with silica nanoparticles are a new generation material under ongoing research and development for gas separation. However, the attributes of a better-performing MMM cannot be precisely studied under experimental conditions. Thus, it requires an atomistic scale study to elucidate the separation performance of silica/polysulfone MMMs. As most of the research work and empirical models for gas transport properties have been limited to pure gas, a computational framework for molecular simulation is required to study the mixed gas transport properties in silica/polysulfone MMMs to reflect real membrane separation. In this work, Monte Carlo (MC) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to study the solubility and diffusivity of CO/CH with varying gas concentrations (i.e., 30% CO/CH, 50% CO/CH, and 70% CO/CH) and silica content (i.e., 15-30 wt.%). The accuracy of the simulated structures was validated with published literature, followed by the study of the gas transport properties at 308.15 K and 1 atm. Simulation results concluded an increase in the free volume with an increasing weight percentage of silica. It was also found that pure gas consistently exhibited higher gas transport properties when compared to mixed gas conditions. The results also showed a competitive gas transport performance for mixed gases, which is more apparent when CO increases. In this context, an increment in the permeation was observed for mixed gas with increasing gas concentrations (i.e., 70% CO/CH > 50% CO/CH > 30% CO/CH). The diffusivity, solubility, and permeability of the mixed gases were consistently increasing until 25 wt.%, followed by a decrease for 30 wt.% of silica. An empirical model based on a parallel resistance approach was developed by incorporating mathematical formulations for solubility and permeability. The model results were compared with simulation results to quantify the effect of mixed gas transport, which showed an 18% and 15% percentage error for the permeability and solubility, respectively, in comparison to the simulation data. This study provides a basis for future understanding of MMMs using molecular simulations and modeling techniques for mixed gas conditions that demonstrate real membrane separation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/polym13132199DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8271399PMC
July 2021

Recent advances in green solvents for lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment: Potential of choline chloride (ChCl) based solvents.

Bioresour Technol 2021 Aug 23;333:125195. Epub 2021 Apr 23.

PETRONAS Research Sdn. Bhd. (PRSB), Lot 3288 & 3289, Off Jalan Ayer Itam, Kawasan Institusi Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor, Malaysia. Electronic address:

Biomass wastes exhibit a great potential to be used as a source of non-depleting renewable energy and synthesis of value-added products. The key to the valorization of excess lignocellulosic biomass wastes in the world lies on the pretreatment process to recalcitrant barrier of the lignocellulosic material for the access to useful substrates. A wide range of pretreatment techniques are available and advances in this field is continuously happening, in search for cheap, effective, and environmentally friendly methods. This review starts with an introduction to conventional approaches and green solvents for pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass. Subsequently, the mechanism of actions along with the advantages and disadvantages of pretreatment techniques were reviewed. The roles of choline chloride (ChCl) in green solvents and their potential applications were also comprehensively reviewed. The collection of ideas in this review serve as an insight for future works or interest on biomass-to-energy conversion using green solvents.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2021.125195DOI Listing
August 2021

Particle swarm optimization and global sensitivity analysis for catalytic co-pyrolysis of Chlorella vulgaris and plastic waste mixtures.

Bioresour Technol 2021 Jun 23;329:124874. Epub 2021 Feb 23.

Energy and Environment Institute, University of Hull, Cottingham Road, Kingston upon Hull HU6 7RX, United Kingdom; B3 Challenge Group, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Hull, Cottingham Road, Hull HU6 7RX, United Kingdom. Electronic address:

This study investigated on the co-pyrolysis of microalgae Chlorella vulgaris and high-density polyethylene (HDPE) waste mixtures which was performed with three types of catalysts, namely limestone (LS), HZSM-5 zeolite, and novel bi-functional LS/HZSM-5/LS. Kissinger-Kai (K-K) model-free method was coupled with Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) model-fitting method using the thermogravimetric experimental data. A global sensitivity analysis was carried out using Latin Hypercube Sampling and rank transformation to assess the extent of impact of the input kinetic parameters on the output results. Furthermore, a thermodynamic analysis was performed to obtain parameters such as enthalpy change (ΔH), Gibb's free energy (ΔG), and entropy change (ΔS). The activation energy (E) of the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris and HDPE binary mixture were found to be lower upon the addition of catalysts. Among the catalyst used, bi-functional LS/HZSM-5 catalyst exhibited the lowest E (83.59 kJ/mol) and ΔH (78 kJ/mol) as compared to LS and HZSM-5 catalysts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2021.124874DOI Listing
June 2021

Uncertainty estimation approach in catalytic fast pyrolysis of rice husk: Thermal degradation, kinetic and thermodynamic parameters study.

Bioresour Technol 2019 Dec 31;294:122089. Epub 2019 Aug 31.

National HiCoE Thermochemical Conversion of Biomass, Centre for Biofuel and Biochemical Research, Institute of Sustainable Building, Chemical Engineering Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Seri Iskandar, Perak 32610, Malaysia.

The aim of this study was to understand the influence of catalyst in thermal degradation behavior of rice husk (RH) in catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) process. An iso-conversional Kissinger kinetic model was introduced into this study to understand the activation energy (E), pre-exponential value (A), Enthalpy (ΔH), Entropy (ΔS) and Gibb's energy (ΔG) of non-catalytic fast pyrolysis (NCFP) and CFP of RH. The study revealed that the addition of natural zeolite catalyst enhanced the rate of devolatilization and decomposition of RH associated with lowest E value (153.10 kJ/mol) compared to other NCFP and CFP using nickel catalyst. Lastly, an uncertainty estimation was applied on the best fit non-linear regression model (MNLR) to identify the explanatory variables. The finding showed that it had the highest probability to obtain 73.8-74.0% mass loss in CFP of rice husk using natural zeolite catalyst.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2019.122089DOI Listing
December 2019

Catalytic thermal degradation of Chlorella vulgaris: Evolving deep neural networks for optimization.

Bioresour Technol 2019 Nov 8;292:121971. Epub 2019 Aug 8.

Brno University of Technology, Institute of Process Engineering & NETME Centre, Technicka 2896/2, 616 69 Brno, Czech Republic.

The aim of this study is to identify the optimum thermal conversion of Chlorella vulgaris with neuro-evolutionary approach. A Progressive Depth Swarm-Evolution (PDSE) neuro-evolutionary approach is proposed to model the Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) data of catalytic thermal degradation of Chlorella vulgaris. Results showed that the proposed method can generate predictions which are more accurate compared to other conventional approaches (>90% lower in Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) and Mean Bias Error (MBE)). In addition, Simulated Annealing is proposed to determine the optimal operating conditions for microalgae conversion from multiple trained ANN. The predicted optimum conditions were reaction temperature of 900.0 °C, heating rate of 5.0 °C/min with the presence of HZSM-5 zeolite catalyst to obtain 88.3% of Chlorella vulgaris conversion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2019.121971DOI Listing
November 2019

Catalytic pyrolysis of Chlorella vulgaris: Kinetic and thermodynamic analysis.

Bioresour Technol 2019 Oct 22;289:121689. Epub 2019 Jun 22.

Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Science, Curtin University Malaysia, CDT 250, 98009 Miri Sarawak, Malaysia. Electronic address:

In the present study, catalytic pyrolysis of Chlorella vulgaris biomass was conducted to analyse the kinetic and thermodynamic performances through thermogravimetric approach. HZSM-5 zeolite, limestone (LS), bifunctional HZSM-5/LS were used as catalysts and the experiments were heated from 50 to 900 °C at heating rates of 10-100 °C/min. Iso-conversional model-free methods such as Flynn-Wall-Ozawa (FWO), Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS), Starink's, and Vyazovkin (V) were employed to evaluate the kinetic parameters meanwhile the thermodynamic parameters were determined by using FWO and KAS methods. The calculated E values of non-catalytic and catalytic pyrolysis of HZSM-5 zeolite, LS, and bifunctional HZSM-5/LS were determined to be in the range of 156.16-158.10 kJ/mol, 145.26-147.84 kJ/mol, 138.81-142.06 kJ/mol, and 133.26 kJ/mol respectively. The results have shown that catalytic pyrolysis with the presence of bifunctional HZSM-5/LS resulted to a lower average E and ΔH compared to HZSM-5, and LS which indicated less energy requirement in the process.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2019.121689DOI Listing
October 2019

Kinetics and thermodynamic analysis in one-pot pyrolysis of rice hull using renewable calcium oxide based catalysts.

Bioresour Technol 2018 Oct 6;265:180-190. Epub 2018 Jun 6.

College of Forest Products and Paper Science, University of the Philippines Los Baños, College, Laguna 4031, Philippines.

Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of catalytic pyrolysis of rice hull (RH) pyrolysis using two different types of renewable catalysts namely natural limestone (LS) and eggshells (ES) using thermogravimetric analysis (TG) approach at different heating rates of 10-100 K min in temperature range of 323-1173 K are investigated. Catalytic pyrolysis mechanism of both catalysts had shown significant effect on the degradation of RH. Model free kinetic of iso-conversional method (Flynn-Wall-Ozawa) and multi-step reaction model (Distributed Activation Energy Model) were employed into present study. The average activation energy was found in the range of 175.4-177.7 kJ mol (RH), 123.3-132.5 kJ mol (RH-LS), and 96.1-100.4 kJ mol (RH-ES) respectively. The syngas composition had increased from 60.05 wt% to 63.1 wt% (RH-LS) and 63.4 wt% (RH-ES). However, the CO content had decreased from 24.1 wt% (RH) to 20.8 wt% (RH-LS) and 19.9 wt% (RH-ES).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2018.06.003DOI Listing
October 2018

Thermogravimetric kinetic modelling of in-situ catalytic pyrolytic conversion of rice husk to bioenergy using rice hull ash catalyst.

Bioresour Technol 2018 Aug 7;261:213-222. Epub 2018 Apr 7.

Resilience Development Initiative, Jl. Imperial Imperial 2, No. 52, Bandung 40135, Indonesia.

The thermal degradation behaviour and kinetic parameter of non-catalytic and catalytic pyrolysis of rice husk (RH) using rice hull ash (RHA) as catalyst were investigated using thermogravimetric analysis at four different heating rates of 10, 20, 50 and 100 K/min. Four different iso conversional kinetic models such as Kissinger, Friedman, Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS) and Ozawa-Flynn-Wall (OFW) were applied in this study to calculate the activation energy (E) and pre-exponential value (A) of the system. The E of non-catalytic and catalytic pyrolysis was found to be in the range of 152-190 kJ/mol and 146-153 kJ/mol, respectively. The results showed that the catalytic pyrolysis of RH had resulted in a lower E as compared to non-catalytic pyrolysis of RH and other biomass in literature. Furthermore, the high Gibb's free energy obtained in RH implied that it has the potential to serve as a source of bioenergy production.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2018.04.020DOI Listing
August 2018