Publications by authors named "Brianne N Richson"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Predicting probable eating disorder case-status in men using the Clinical Impairment Assessment: Evidence for a gender-specific threshold.

Eat Behav 2021 08 20;42:101541. Epub 2021 Jul 20.

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.

The Clinical Impairment Assessment (CIA) is a widely used self-report measure of the psychosocial impairment associated with eating-disorder symptoms. Past studies recommended a global CIA score of 16 to identify clinically significant impairment associated with a probable eating disorder (ED). However, to date, research on the properties of the CIA has been conducted in majority-women samples. Preliminary research on gender differences in CIA scores suggested men with EDs report less impairment on the CIA relative to women with EDs. Thus, the purpose of this study was to test if a different impairment threshold is needed to identify cases of men with EDs. We hypothesized that a lower CIA threshold, relative to that identified in majority-women samples, would most accurately identify men with EDs. Participants (N = 162) were men from our university-based and general community-based ED participant registry who completed the CIA and Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale. Both precision-recall and receiver operating characteristic curves assessed what CIA global score threshold most accurately identified men with EDs. Both analytic approaches indicated that a CIA global score of 13 best predicted ED case-status in men. Consistent with past research, men with a clinically significant ED appear to report lower impairment on the CIA. Results have implications for screening and assessing for substantial ED-related impairment in men. Additionally, past research using the CIA to identify men with EDs may have under-identified men with clinically significant symptoms.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eatbeh.2021.101541DOI Listing
August 2021

Measurement invariance of the Eating Pathology Symptoms Inventory (EPSI) in adolescents and adults.

Eat Behav 2021 08 2;42:101538. Epub 2021 Jul 2.

Recovery Record, Inc., San Francisco, CA, USA.

Adolescence is a common period for eating disorder (ED) onset. The availability of psychometrically sound measures of ED psychopathology enables clinicians to accurately assess symptoms and monitor treatment outcomes continuously from adolescence and adulthood. The purpose of this study was to assess if the Eating Pathology Symptoms Inventory (EPSI) is invariant across adolescents and adults. Participants (N = 29,821) were adolescent (n = 5250) and adult (n = 24,571) users of the Recovery Record (RR) mobile phone application who provided EPSI responses through the application. Measurement invariance testing was conducted to assess invariance of the EPSI Body Dissatisfaction, Restricting, Excessive Exercise, Purging, Cognitive Restraint, and Binge Eating scales across adolescents (age 13 through 17) and adults (age 18 and older). Findings indicated that all EPSI factors administered in the RR app replicated in both adolescent and adult users. The EPSI factor structure was largely equivalent in adolescents and adults, demonstrating evidence for configural and metric invariance, as well as some evidence for scalar invariance. Our results indicated that EPSI scales measured the same constructs across development. Clinicians and researchers may benefit from utilizing the EPSI to measure ED psychopathology in adolescents and for continued progress monitoring into adulthood.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eatbeh.2021.101538DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8518978PMC
August 2021

Validation of the factor structure of the Eating Pathology Symptoms Inventory in an international sample of sexual minority men.

Eat Behav 2021 08 26;42:101511. Epub 2021 Apr 26.

University of Melbourne, Department of Psychology, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia.

Sexual minority individuals are at greater risk for the development of eating-disorder (ED) psychopathology. Despite the importance of understanding ED symptoms in sexual minority men, most ED measures were developed and validated in heterosexual, young adult, white women. The psychometric properties of ED measures in diverse populations remain largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to test: 1) whether the eight-factor structure of the Eating Pathology Symptoms Inventory (EPSI) replicated in sexual minority men and 2) group-level mean differences between gay and bisexual men on the eight EPSI scales. International participants (N = 722 sexual minority men from 20 countries) were recruited via the Grindr smartphone application. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was completed using a weighted least square mean and variance adjusted estimator. Group differences in eating pathology between gay and bisexual men were tested using independent samples t-tests. The CFA model fit was good on all fit indices (CFI/TLI > 0.90, RMSEA < 0.06). Gay and bisexual men only differed on the EPSI Binge Eating scale. The results of this investigation suggest that the EPSI may be a useful tool for understanding eating pathology in this population. Using psychometrically sound assessment tools for sexual minority men is a vital piece of treatment planning and clinical decision making. The current study fills an important gap in the clinical and research literature by testing the validity and psychometric properties of a commonly used ED measure in sexual minority men.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eatbeh.2021.101511DOI Listing
August 2021

Food insecurity associated with elevated eating disorder symptoms, impairment, and eating disorder diagnoses in an American University student sample before and during the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Int J Eat Disord 2021 07 22;54(7):1213-1223. Epub 2021 Apr 22.

Department of Psychology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, USA.

Objective: This study tested the association between food insecurity and eating disorder (ED) pathology, including probable ED diagnosis, among two cohorts of university students before and during the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Method: Students (n = 579) from a large Midwestern American university completed self-report questionnaires assessing frequency of ED behaviors, ED-related impairment, and individual food insecurity as measured by the Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale 5, Clinical Impairment Assessment, and Radimer/Cornell, respectively. Chi-square tests and MANOVA with post-hoc corrections were conducted to compare demographic characteristics, ED pathology, and probable ED diagnosis prevalence between students with and without individual food insecurity.

Results: Partially supporting hypotheses, MANOVA indicated significantly greater frequency of objective binge eating, compensatory fasting, and ED-related impairment for students with food insecurity compared with individuals without food insecurity. Chi-squared tests showed higher prevalence of ED diagnoses among individuals with food insecurity compared with those without food security (47.6 vs. 31.1%, respectively, p < .01, NNT = 6.06), specifically bulimia nervosa and other specified feeding and eating disorder. There were no differences in food insecurity before or during the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Discussion: Consistent with prior literature, food insecurity was associated with elevated ED psychopathology in this sample. Findings emphasize the importance of proper ED screening for college students vulnerable to food insecurity and EDs.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23517DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8250281PMC
July 2021

Are the Criterion B binge-eating symptoms interchangeable in understanding binge-eating severity? An item response theory analysis.

Int J Eat Disord 2020 12 18;53(12):1983-1992. Epub 2020 Sep 18.

Sanford Center for Biobehavioral Research, Fargo, North Dakota, USA.

Objective: The Criterion B binge-eating symptoms represent five symptoms associated with binge eating. Any three out of five symptoms can be used to meet Criterion B. However, Criterion B symptoms may not be interchangeable in terms of how binge-eating severity is associated with each symptom. Item response theory (IRT) can test how endorsing each symptom relates to the overall level (i.e., severity) of binge-eating measured by Criterion B. We used IRT to identify (a) how each Criterion B symptom corresponded with binge-eating severity in a transdiagnostic binge-eating sample and (b) how well each symptom differentiated individuals with differing levels of severity.

Method: Participants (N = 219) were adults (80.8% female) with a current ED that included objective binge-eating episodes assessed via semi-structured interview. A two-parameter logistic IRT model evaluated how endorsement of each Criterion B symptom corresponded with the level of latent binge-eating severity.

Results: "Eating large amounts when not hungry" and "eating alone" reflected the highest binge-eating severity. "Eating alone" was the best discriminator across different binge-eating severity levels, whereas "uncomfortably full" was the poorest discriminator across binge-eating severity levels.

Discussion: Criterion B symptoms were not interchangeable in terms of what level of binge-eating severity corresponded with symptom endorsement. "Eating large amounts when not hungry" or "eating alone" may signify elevated binge-eating severity, whereas "uncomfortably full" and "feeling disgusted/depressed/guilty" were not necessarily indicative of elevated severity. Results suggested that Criterion B may need to be revised to eliminate symptoms that are redundant with other binge-eating diagnostic criteria.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23383DOI Listing
December 2020
-->