Publications by authors named "Breanna Grunthal"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Adaptive disclosure, a combat-specific PTSD treatment, versus cognitive-processing therapy, in deployed marines and sailors: A randomized controlled non-inferiority trial.

Psychiatry Res 2021 Mar 24;297:113761. Epub 2021 Jan 24.

Center of Excellence for Stress and Mental Health, VA San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, CA, United States; Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA, United States.

Adaptive Disclosure (AD) is a new emotion-focused psychotherapy for combat-related PTSD. As a second step in the evaluation process, we conducted a non-inferiority (NI) trial of AD, relative to Cognitive Processing Therapy - Cognitive Therapy version (CPT-C), an established first-line psychotherapy. Participants were 122 U.S. Marines and Sailors. The primary endpoint was PTSD symptom severity change from pre- to posttreatment, using the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale for DSM-IV. Secondary endpoints were depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-9; PHQ-9) and functioning (Veterans Rand Health Survey-12; VR-12). For cases with complete data, the mean difference in CAPS-IV change scores was 0.33 and the confidence interval (CI) did not include the predefined NI margin (95% CI =-10.10, 9.44). The mean difference in PHQ-9 change scores was -1.01 and the CI did not include the predefined margin (95% CI = -3.31, 1.28), as was the case for the VR-12 Physical Component and VR-12 Mental Component subscale scores (0.27; 95% CI = -4.50, 3.95, and -2.10; 95% CI = -7.03, 2.83, respectively). A series of intent-to-treat sensitivity analyses confirmed these results. The differential effect size for CAPS-IV was d = 0.01 (nonsignificant). As predicted, Adaptive Disclosure was found to be no less effective than a first-line psychotherapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2021.113761DOI Listing
March 2021

Parameters of Aggressive Behavior in a Treatment-Seeking Sample of Military Personnel: A Secondary Analysis of Three Randomized Controlled Trials of Evidence-Based PTSD Treatments.

Behav Ther 2021 01 30;52(1):136-148. Epub 2020 Mar 30.

VA Boston Healthcare System and Boston University School of Medicine.

Aggressive behavior is prevalent among veterans of post-9/11 conflicts who have posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, little is known about whether PTSD treatments reduce aggression or the direction of the association between changes in PTSD symptoms and aggression in the context of PTSD treatment. We combined data from three clinical trials of evidence-based PTSD treatment in service members (N = 592) to: (1) examine whether PTSD treatment reduces psychological (e.g., verbal behavior) and physical aggression, and; (2) explore temporal associations between aggressive behavior and PTSD. Both psychological (Estimate = -2.20, SE = 0.07) and physical aggression (Estimate = -0.36, SE = 0.05) were significantly reduced from baseline to posttreatment follow-up. Lagged PTSD symptom reduction was not associated with reduced reports of aggression; however, higher baseline PTSD scores were significantly associated with greater reductions in psychological aggression (exclusively; ß = -0.67, 95% CI = -1.05, -0.30, SE = -3.49). Findings reveal that service members receiving PTSD treatment report substantial collateral changes in psychological aggression over time, particularly for participants with greater PTSD symptom severity. Clinicians should consider cotherapies or alternative ways of targeting physical aggression among service members with PTSD and alternative approaches to reduce psychological aggression among service members with relatively low PTSD symptom severity when considering evidence-based PTSD treatments.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.beth.2020.03.007DOI Listing
January 2021

Public Recognition and Perceptions of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.

Community Ment Health J 2019 01 12;55(1):74-82. Epub 2018 Aug 12.

Department of Psychology, Binghamton University - State University of New York, 4400 Vestal Parkway East, P.O. Box 6000, Binghamton, NY, 13902, USA.

Previous research has indicated that the public's knowledge on obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is poor. Public understanding and perception of OCD may be one contributor to this issue. Given that mental health literacy is an important first step for those to receive the appropriate care, we sought to understand more about the public's awareness and perceptions of OCD. Data regarding knowledge of OCD were collected through a New York statewide telephone survey (N = 806). Results indicated that those who had never heard of OCD were more likely to be ethnic minorities, have a lower income, and less education. Most participants described OCD either in terms of compulsions or in terms of perfectionism. Almost half (46.5%) of participants did not think there is a difference between someone with OCD and someone who is obsessive-compulsive. These findings are consistent with previous literature regarding race and treatment seeking behaviors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10597-018-0323-zDOI Listing
January 2019