Publications by authors named "Brayden Kameg"

36 Publications

Associations Between Adverse Childhood Experiences and Substance Use in Nursing Students.

J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv 2021 Jul 1;59(7):43-47. Epub 2021 Jul 1.

Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are a public health problem, and exposure to ACEs can lead to negative health consequences, including substance use. Little is known about ACEs and substance use in the nursing student population. The purpose of the current study was to describe the types of ACEs encountered by nursing students and the rate at which they occur; and examine associations between individual ACEs and alcohol and drug use. This study uses a cross-sectional, descriptive design. Measurements were used to assess and quantify ACEs and alcohol and drug use. There were small to medium associations between alcohol use and ACE items, and more modest associations found between drug use and ACE items ( < 0.001). Findings highlight the need for a trauma-informed approach to nursing education. [(7), 43-47.].
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/02793695-20210219-03DOI Listing
July 2021

Mental wellness among psychiatric-mental health nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Arch Psychiatr Nurs 2021 08 11;35(4):401-406. Epub 2021 May 11.

University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, Department of Health and Community Systems, 3500 Victoria St., Pittsburgh, PA 15213, United States of America.

Psychiatric nursing providers and their unique challenges in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic are not well-represented in the literature. Therefore, this study sought to describe mental well-being of psychiatric nurses, and sought to elucidate factors related to mental wellness during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study utilized cross-sectional survey methodology to evaluate burnout, mental wellness, COVID-related anxiety, professional fulfillment, depressive symptoms, and anxiety symptoms among psychiatric nurses. There was a total of 151 respondents. A linear regression model was employed to identify predictors of mental wellness. The final regression model included the following predictors: depressive symptoms, burnout, professional fulfillment, and educational status. These predictors together accounted for 73% of the variance for the outcome variable of mental well-being.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apnu.2021.05.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8110327PMC
August 2021

Effect of Standardized Patient Simulation on Nursing Students' Attitudes Toward Psychiatric Nursing and Patients With Mental Health Problems.

J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv 2021 Jun 1:1-7. Epub 2021 Jun 1.

The purpose of the current study was to evaluate changes in attitudes toward psychiatric nursing and mental health problems in a sample of nursing students after exposure to high-fidelity standardized patient (SP) simulation scenarios. This study used a quasi-experimental, single-group pre-/post-survey approach. Immediately before and after exposure to SP simulation scenarios, undergraduate nursing students completed Attitudes to Mental Illness (AMI) and the Attitudes to Psychiatry (ATP) surveys. There were significant improvements in the following ATP domains: psychiatric career choice and psychiatric teaching ( = 0.046 and 0.007, respectively). There were no significant changes in the AMI survey, but items related to social stigma improved following the simulation. Findings of this study suggest a potential benefit of SP simulation on nursing students in developing their attitudes toward psychiatry and mental health problems. [(xx), xx-xx.].
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/02793695-20210513-01DOI Listing
June 2021

Characteristics of electronic cigarette user and traditional smokers: 2017 Youth risk behavior surveillance system.

Public Health Nurs 2021 Jun 8. Epub 2021 Jun 8.

School of Nursing, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.

Background: Although electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use among adolescents rapidly has increased over the past decade, which has raised concerns over the corresponding behavioral health risks, the current literature presents limited data for understanding the characteristics of adolescent e-cigarette users.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to (1) identify general characteristics that may be shared between e-cigarette users and traditional cigarette smokers and (2) examine the unique characteristics of e-cigarette users vis-à-vis traditional cigarette smokers.

Design: Cross-sectional descriptive study.

Sample And Data Source: A total of 14,765 9th- to 12-grade students drawn from the CDC 2017 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System.

Results: We observed that the prevalence of marijuana, alcohol, and other illicit drug use was higher among e-cigarette users and traditional tobacco users than non-users. Moreover, physically active adolescents were more likely to use e-cigarettes than those who were physically inactive, although the level of the activity did not predict smoking status.

Conclusion: We recommend that primary prevention strategies for e-cigarette use should be incorporated in physical education programs and target adolescents who engage in not only health risk behaviors, but also health promoting behaviors, such as physical activity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/phn.12936DOI Listing
June 2021

Antitransgender legislation and the need to advocate for transgender youth.

Authors:
Brayden Kameg

J Child Adolesc Psychiatr Nurs 2021 May 7;34(2):81-82. Epub 2021 May 7.

Department of Health and Community Systems, University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcap.12322DOI Listing
May 2021

Atypical antipsychotics: Managing adverse effects.

Perspect Psychiatr Care 2021 May 5. Epub 2021 May 5.

Department of Health and Community Systems, University of Pittsburgh, School of Nursing, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.

Purpose: The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of common adverse effects and management strategies related to atypical antipsychotic use.

Conclusions: Atypical antipsychotics are commonly prescribed. While effective, atypical antipsychotics are associated with metabolic syndrome, extrapyramidal symptoms, and tardive dyskinesia, among others adverse effects. Management strategies can mitigate adverse effects and promote optimum quality of life.

Practice Implications: To be able to identify and manage adverse effects associated with the use of atypical antipsychotics, it is important to build a supportive therapeutic environment at each interaction with patients and their caregivers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ppc.12837DOI Listing
May 2021

Mental health problems among youth experiencing sex trafficking.

Nursing 2021 Mar;51(3):24-29

In Pittsburgh, Pa., Nicole Fazio is a senior professional clinical nurse at UPMC Magee-Womens Hospital Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Jenna Lynch is a senior professional clinical nurse at UPMC Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Brayden Kameg is an assistant professor of nursing at the University of Pittsburgh, and Maura Devlin is a senior professional staff nurse at UPMC Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh.

Abstract: There are an estimated 4.8 million victims of sex trafficking (ST) globally, and 21% of these victims are children or adolescents. Victims of ST are at risk for mental health problems, and it is crucial for healthcare professionals to identify them and provide care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.NURSE.0000733940.33418.9dDOI Listing
March 2021

Medical Marijuana: Liability Issues for Mental Health Providers.

J Addict Nurs 2021 Jan-Mar 01;32(1):73-76

Abstract: As of 2019, 33 states, in addition to three territories and the District of Columbia, have approved medical marijuana programs. In the United States, the 12-month prevalence of medical marijuana use increased by 34.2% between 2013 and 2015. The rapid dissemination of medical marijuana use, in conjunction with conflicting data regarding its safety and efficacy, renders mental health providers in an ethical and legal quandary. The purpose of this article was to highlight emerging evidence regarding the efficacy and risks of medical marijuana and to describe medical-legal issues of such use regarding liability for mental health providers. Mental health care providers must be prudent to ensure that they are providing patients with the most accurate, up-to-date information regarding medical marijuana. This is not only to ensure protection from medical liability but also to promote best outcomes for patients experiencing mental health problems.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JAN.0000000000000390DOI Listing
March 2021

Best practices in benzodiazepine prescribing and management in primary care.

Nurse Pract 2021 Mar;46(3):30-36

Abstract: Despite the lack of evidence on the long-term effectiveness of benzodiazepines and their potential harmful effects, prescriptions of the drug have significantly increased in the US over the past decade. This article reviews best practices regarding primary care benzodiazepine prescriptions and how providers can best prevent and treat benzodiazepine use disorder and other harmful effects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.NPR.0000733684.24949.19DOI Listing
March 2021

Modernizing Perinatal Substance Use Management.

Authors:
Brayden N Kameg

Policy Polit Nurs Pract 2021 May 21;22(2):146-155. Epub 2020 Dec 21.

Department of Health and Community Systems, University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States.

The increase in prescription and illicit opioid use since 2000 has become an urgent public health crisis. While the opioid epidemic spans racial, regional, and socioeconomic divides, women have surfaced as one demographic affected by opioid use and related sequelae. Certain federal and state regulations, secondary to the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act, strip pregnant women with opioid use disorders of the ability to engage autonomously with their health care clinician while simultaneously impeding their ability to achieve and sustain recovery. The purpose of this article is to explore current health policy that impacts pregnant women who use opioids. Recommendations to improve care, broadly, will be highlighted to include access to contraceptive services, universal screening for perinatal substance use, and access to appropriate treatment strategies. Policy modifications to facilitate these recommendations are discussed. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Policy Analytical Framework was utilized to derive recommendations. The recommendations are relevant to advanced practice registered nurses and midwives who have the potential to treat substance use in women, to women's health and pediatric registered nurses, and to nursing administrators who are involved in decision-making in obstetric and pediatric settings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1527154420981945DOI Listing
May 2021

Depression and Glycemic Control in the Primary Care Setting: An Overview for Primary Care Providers.

J Dr Nurs Pract 2020 11;13(3):202-206

Department of Health and Community Systems, University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, Pittsburgh, PA

Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus and depression are frequently comorbid health conditions. Outcomes are generally poorer when the two diseases states co-occur, including the risk of long-term complications, quality of life, mortality, and associated healthcare costs.

Objective: The purpose of this article is to review the relationship between type 2 diabetes mellitus and depression, as well as to provide recommendations on the integration of their management in primary care.

Methods: Utilizing PubMed and CINAHL, a literature review was completed to identify research pertaining to comorbid depression and diabetes. Reference lists of identified articles were also explored for relevance.

Results: There is evidence demonstrating the relationship between diabetes and depression, and a myriad of screening tools and treatment options that can be implemented within the primary care setting.

Conclusions: Based on current evidence, it is recommended that mood symptoms should be addressed as part of standard diabetes care in the primary care setting, and patients diagnosed with depression should be screened for diabetes.

Implications For Nursing: Addressing both depression and diabetes are within the primary care scope of practice. The call to primary care providers to holistically, collaboratively, and simultaneously improve the outcomes of these comorbid conditions is now.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/JDNP-D-19-00008DOI Listing
November 2020

Mental health problems among youth experiencing sex trafficking.

Nurse Pract 2021 Jan;46(1):6-11

Abstract: There are an estimated 4.8 million victims of sex trafficking (ST) globally, and 21% of these victims are children or adolescents. Victims of ST are at risk for mental health problems, and it is critical that primary care providers can accurately identify and treat them.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.NPR.0000724488.49036.c9DOI Listing
January 2021

Retrospective Analysis of Demographic, Psychiatric, and Physical Characteristics That Impact Length of Stay on an Inpatient Geriatric Psychiatric Unit.

Issues Ment Health Nurs 2021 Aug 17;42(8):736-740. Epub 2020 Dec 17.

Health and Community Systems, University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.

Currently, the aging adult population is rising fast and presenting multiple challenges for the US healthcare system. Older adults present unique challenges in their care of medical and psychiatric conditions. This study retrospectively examined characteristics that are associated with length of stay on an inpatient geriatric psychiatric unit in an urban located psychiatric hospital. A sample of 74 individuals was examined. Factors that influenced length of stay included commitment status and discharge to a different level of care. Reducing the length of stay for geriatric patients can help reduce costs and improve health outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01612840.2020.1852459DOI Listing
August 2021

Women of Childbearing Age and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Prevention: A Position Paper.

J Addict Nurs 2020 Oct/Dec;31(4):302-306

Khadejah F. Mahmoud, PhD, MSN, Department of Health Policy and Management, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Kira J. Griffith, BSN, Unit 3E Cardiothoracic Surgery/Stepdown, UPMC Presbyterian, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Annie Hayden, University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Susanne A. Fogger, DNP, CRNP, PMHNP-BC, CARN-AP, FAANP, School of Nursing, The University of Alabama at Birmingham. Brayden N. Kameg, DNP, PMHNP-BC, CARN, CNE, and Ann M. Mitchell, PhD, RN, AHN-BC, FIAAN, FAAN, Health & Community Systems, University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, Pennsylvania.

It is the position of the International Nurses Society on Addictions that all nurses, in all settings, should be prepared to provide care to patients with alcohol use problems, especially for women of childbearing age.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JAN.0000000000000371DOI Listing
June 2021

Bipolar disorder: Treatment strategies for women of childbearing age.

Authors:
Brayden N Kameg

Perspect Psychiatr Care 2021 Jul 8;57(3):1244-1249. Epub 2020 Nov 8.

Department of Health and Community Systems, University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.

Purpose: Bipolar disorder is associated with increased rates of morbidity and mortality, magnified in women of childbearing age. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the differential diagnosis and management of bipolar disorder in women of childbearing age.

Conclusions: Differential diagnoses for bipolar disorder include depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, trauma-related disorders, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and personality disorders. Pharmacotherapeutic options for the treatment of bipolar disorder include lithium, anti-epileptic medications, and atypical antipsychotics. In regard to women of childbearing age, consideration of risks, benefits, and alternative therapies is needed before initiating therapy.

Practice Implications: Caring for patients with bipolar disorder, particularly women of childbearing age, requires careful differentiation of bipolar disorder from other mental health problems, and prudent consideration of pharmacotherapeutic options.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ppc.12680DOI Listing
July 2021

Preparing nurse practitioners to combat the opioid epidemic: A survey of nurse practitioner academic programs in the United States.

J Am Assoc Nurse Pract 2020 Sep 23. Epub 2020 Sep 23.

Department of Health and Community Systems, University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Between 1999 and 2017, nearly 400,000 individuals died from opioid-related overdoses in the United States. Nurse practitioners (NPs) can be instrumental in providing care for those with opioid use disorders (OUDs) but must be adequately prepared to do so. Currently, there is limited evidence regarding how NP programs are preparing their graduates to address opioid use. The purpose of this study was to evaluate how NP programs have addressed the opioid epidemic within their curricula, and to evaluate barriers to and facilitators of curricular modifications. Electronic surveys were distributed to all 444 NP program directors in the United States. The survey consisted of 10 questions and inquired about curricular modifications made in regard to OUDs, barriers and facilitators of such modifications, and perceived importance of addressing the opioid epidemic within NP programs.A total of 130 (29.3%) of program directors responded to the survey. Of the program directors who responded, 89 (76.1%) reported that curricular modifications were made to address OUDs. Barriers to curricular modification included limited time, lack of faculty expertise or confidence, and stigma in regard to opioid use. Facilitators included faculty champions, availability of external educational resources, student interest, and financial incentives. Nurse practitioners can treat patients with OUDs, mitigating significant barriers to care reported in light of the opioid epidemic. Graduate NP programs should assure that curricula adequately cover opioid use and related management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JXX.0000000000000502DOI Listing
September 2020

Caring for Patients With Opioid Use Disorder in the Midst of a Pandemic: A Call to Action for All Nurses.

J Addict Nurs 2020 Jul/Sep;31(3):141-143

Khadejah F. Mahmoud, PhD, MSN, Health Policy and Management, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Brayden N. Kameg, DNP, PMHNP-BC, CARN, CNE, Health & Community Systems, University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, Pennsylvania. Hayley D. Germack, PhD, MHS, RN, Acute & Tertiary Care, University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, Pennsylvania.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JAN.0000000000000355DOI Listing
April 2021

Shifting the Paradigm for Opioid Use Disorder: Changing the Language.

Authors:
Brayden N Kameg

J Nurse Pract 2019 Nov-Dec;15(10):757-759. Epub 2019 Sep 20.

University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, Department of Health and Community Systems, 3500 Victoria St. Suite 415, Pittsburgh, PA 15261.

Morbidity and mortality associated from opioid use have been on the rise, exemplifying a major public health epidemic. Despite public health interventions, opioid-related morbidity and mortality have yet to plateau or decrease. One explanation for this phenomenon is the presence of barriers to evidence-based pharmacotherapies. Stigma has only recently been identified as a barrier to treatment. The purpose of this report is to evaluate language utilized to describe opioid use disorder and associated pharmacological treatment. Nurse practitioners must emerge as leaders in assuring that patient-centered and non-stigmatizing language is utilized, in order to improve patient outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nurpra.2019.08.020DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7448578PMC
September 2019

Treatment-resistant depression: An overview for psychiatric advanced practice nurses.

Perspect Psychiatr Care 2021 Apr 10;57(2):689-694. Epub 2020 Aug 10.

Robert Morris University School of Nursing, Education, and Human Studies, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Purpose: Treatment-resistant depression (TRD) can require complex management. The purpose of this paper is to provide an update on the hypothesized neurobiology of depression, and to describe treatment options for patients impacted by TRD.

Conclusions: Recent neurobiological findings support the use of augmenting pharmacological agents, neuromodulation techniques, and esketamine as effective in achieving remission for those with TRD.

Practice Implications: First-line interventions for depression can be safely managed by primary care providers. Psychiatric advanced practice nurses must be well versed and capable of treating more complicated cases, including TRD, that may require second- or third-line approaches.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ppc.12596DOI Listing
April 2021

Strategies for Alcohol Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment Sustainability in the Emergency Department.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2020 Jul/Sep;42(3):225-230

School of Nursing, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, Illinois (Dr Bacidore); School of Nursing, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Dr Kameg); and School of Nursing, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Dr Mitchell).

Alcohol misuse remains the fourth leading cause of preventable death in the United States, with nearly 90,000 deaths occurring annually as a consequence of alcohol misuse. Screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) is an evidence-based strategy that includes initial screening using a valid tool, determining the need for intervention, a brief motivational interview, and referral to treatment leading to follow-up care when necessary. Although an abundance of evidence-based practices now exist as a guideline for quality patient care, an inconsistency persists between protocols supported by research and those actually integrated into daily clinical practice. Currently, there is little in the literature examining the sustainability of SBIRT programs in emergency departments. The authors examine challenges to SBIRT implementation in the emergency department and propose a number of strategies to ensure continued sustainability of this evidence-based practice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000311DOI Listing
April 2021

Intimate partner violence in adolescents: Preventive strategies for psychiatric-mental health nurse practitioners.

J Child Adolesc Psychiatr Nurs 2020 08 13;33(3):163-168. Epub 2020 Jul 13.

Department of Health and Community Systems, University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.

Topic: Intimate partner violence (IPV) remains a significant public health problem that is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. IPV has become increasingly prevalent in adolescents, with 20% of adolescents between 13 and 18 years reporting physical IPV, and 9% reporting sexual IPV. To assure the best outcomes for adolescents at-risk for or experiencing IPV, it is critical for psychiatric-mental health nurse practitioners (PMHNPs) to implement preventive interventions, spanning from primary to tertiary prevention, to address IPV.

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of primary, secondary, and tertiary preventative strategies needed to improve outcomes for adolescents experiencing IPV within the context of the socioecologial model.

Sources Used: Utilizing PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO, a literature review was conducted to identify relevant publications spanning from 2015 to present. Reference lists of identified articles were also searched.

Conclusions: PMHNPs must be competent in psychoeducation and counseling, screening, and management of comorbidities and safety planning to assure best outcomes for adolescents exposed to IPV.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcap.12286DOI Listing
August 2020

Climate Change and Mental Health: Implications for Nurses.

Authors:
Brayden N Kameg

J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv 2020 Sep 1;58(9):25-30. Epub 2020 Jul 1.

Climate change has received public health attention over the past 3 decades. It is well established that climate change is associated with myriad health issues, but less has been mentioned in public health discourse about the impacts of climate change on population mental health. The purpose of the current article is to provide an overview of the impacts of climate change on mental health, and to discuss opportunities for mental health nurses to reduce health problems related to climate change. Acute events and chronic consequences of climate change can impact mental health outcomes and contribute to depressive disorders, anxiety, and trauma-related disorders. The nursing profession must be prepared to address climate change to promote best health outcomes for individuals around the globe. It is critical that mental health nurses act as leaders in understanding and addressing climate change to improve the mental health of populations. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 58(9), 25-30.].
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/02793695-20200624-05DOI Listing
September 2020

Technology-Based Educational Approaches to Address Opioid Use Management by Advanced Practice Registered Nurses.

Issues Ment Health Nurs 2020 Oct 25;41(10):940-945. Epub 2020 Jun 25.

Department of Health and Community Systems, University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.

Opioid overdose remains the leading cause of accidental death, with 64,000 deaths attributable to opioid-related overdoses in 2016 and a 20% increase in mortality since 2015. Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) are now eligible to prescribe buprenorphine. The purpose of this project was to develop educational training materials regarding opioid use management; widely disseminate these materials; monitor reach and intervention efficacy in precipitating practice change; and to evaluate barriers and facilitators of buprenorphine prescribing. The authors developed a three-webinar series pertaining to opioid use management. A broad marketing and dissemination approach was utilized. Demographic data was collected when individuals registered to participate in the webinar series. Follow-up data was collected post-webinar and sought to assess practice change, and barriers to and facilitators of buprenorphine prescribing. Of the 670 individuals that viewed one or more of the live webinars, 218 (32.5%) completed a portion of one or both of the follow-up surveys (at 3- and 6-months post-webinar). Of the respondents, 39 (18%) had obtained the DATA 2000 (buprenorphine) waiver since viewing the webinar series, and 11 (5.1%) were in the process of obtaining the DATA 2000 waiver. Barriers to buprenorphine prescribing included regulatory factors, patient-specific factors, and provider-specific factors. Facilitators to buprenorphine prescribing included institutional support and mentorship, collaboration with professional organizations, increased community awareness, and patient outcomes. APRNs should be abreast of best practices in the management of opioid use disorders. Barriers to and facilitators of buprenorphine prescribing must be understood and addressed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01612840.2020.1749917DOI Listing
October 2020

Psychiatric-mental health nursing leadership during coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).

Authors:
Brayden N Kameg

J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs 2021 Aug 14;28(4):507-508. Epub 2020 Jun 14.

Department of Nursing, University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jpm.12662DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7300866PMC
August 2021

Gender Dysphoria in United States Veterans and Military Personnel: Historical Context and Current Policies.

Authors:
Brayden Kameg

J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv 2020 Aug 14;58(8):5-8. Epub 2020 Apr 14.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/02793695-20200403-01DOI Listing
August 2020

Substance Use and Exposure to Adverse Childhood Experiences in Undergraduate and Graduate Nursing Students[Formula: see text].

J Am Psychiatr Nurses Assoc 2020 Jul/Aug;26(4):354-363. Epub 2020 Feb 13.

Ann Mitchell, PhD, RN, FAAN, FIAAN, University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

Substance misuse remains a public health crisis and contributor to morbidity and mortality. The nursing workforce is not immune to the impacts of substance misuse as rates are thought to mirror those of the general population. Additionally, as substance misuse often begins in adolescence or early adulthood, prevalence of misuse among practicing nurses highlights the fact that students are also at risk. The purpose of this study was to examine rates and patterns of substance use and adverse childhood experience (ACE) exposure among nursing students while also examining associations between substance use and ACE exposure. This study utilizes a cross-sectional and descriptive design through the provision of email surveys to nursing students. Email surveys consisting of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, the Drug Abuse Screening Tool 10-item survey, the ACE Questionnaire, and a demographic inquiry were distributed via Qualtrics survey software. A total of 662 individuals participated in the survey, the majority of whom self-identified as female, were undergraduate students, and were between 18 and 21 years. Moderate- to high-risk alcohol use was identified in 20% of students, while moderate- to high-risk drug use was identified in 3.6% of students. More than half of students endorsed exposure to at least one ACE. Significant associations were found between the Drug Abuse Screening Tool 10-item survey and the ACE Questionnaire. The results of this study have significant implications for nursing educators and must inform groundwork for the development of policies and interventions that are evidence based, nonpunitive, and trauma informed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1078390320905669DOI Listing
May 2021

Management of mental health conditions in refugee youth: An overview for the psychiatric-mental health nurse practitioner.

Authors:
Brayden N Kameg

J Child Adolesc Psychiatr Nurs 2019 11 15;32(4):179-186. Epub 2019 Sep 15.

Department of Health and Community Systems, University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Topic: In 2017, there were a total of 70 million forcibly displaced individuals or refugees, worldwide. Unfortunately, over 50% of refugees are under the age of 18 years. Refugee youth are at-risk for a variety of mental health conditions.

Purpose: The purpose of this report is to provide psychiatric-mental health nurse practitioners (PMHNPs) with an understanding of unique cultural implications in refugee youth, risk factors towards the development of psychiatric illness, and means to identify those at-risk for sequelae or those meeting diagnostic criteria. Also presented are foundational treatment and management implications to ensure the provision of culturally sensitive and efficacious care to this unique population.

Sources Used: Utilizing PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO, a literature review was conducted to identify relevant publications pertaining to mental health issues in refugee youth spanning from 2013 to present. Reference lists of identified articles were also searched.

Conclusions: A variety of risk and protective factors are discussed, spanning from premigration, during flight, and postsettling periods. PMHNPs must be proficient in screening and diagnosis of mental health conditions in refugee youth and implementation of pharmacological and psychotherapeutic interventions. PMHNPs must also be well versed in community-based resources that can be utilized to promote optimal outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcap.12253DOI Listing
November 2019

Substance Use Patterns Among Adolescents: A Latent Class Analysis.

J Am Psychiatr Nurses Assoc 2020 Nov/Dec;26(6):586-594. Epub 2019 Jun 28.

Brian Greene, EdD, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

Substance use among adolescents remains a major public health concern, which is correlated with mortality. The purpose of this study was to (1) examine risk factors predisposing adolescents to substance use and (2) identify patterns of simultaneous drug exploration among adolescents. Data ( = 15,624; collected in 2015) were drawn from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Youth Risk Behavior Survey, which is a national school-based survey of 9th- to 12th-grade students to monitor health risk behaviors. Substance use was assessed using self-reported questionnaires, and latent class analysis and logistic regression were used for data analysis. Five latent patterns of substance use were identified: (1) (64%); (2) (25%) (i.e., used alcohol, e-cigarettes, and/or marijuana); (3) (6%) (i.e., used alcohol, cigarettes, e-cigarettes, marijuana, synthetic marijuana, and/or prescription pills); (4) (4%), (i.e., used prescription pills); (5) (2%) (i.e., likely to use all assessed substances). Gender, race, grade, and depressive mood were strong predictors of membership in a particular substance use class. Adolescents presenting for care may possess symptoms associated with various substances beyond those being managed. Mental health nurses can leverage these results in reducing adolescent substance use through primary and secondary prevention. A longitudinal study of not only substance use patterns but also the progression to substance use disorders among adolescents is warranted.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1078390319858658DOI Listing
June 2021

Nursing Students Learn Online Interprofessional Education on Substance Use.

Can J Nurs Res 2020 Mar 4;52(1):8-14. Epub 2019 Apr 4.

Health & Community Systems, School of Nursing, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0844562119840172DOI Listing
March 2020
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