Publications by authors named "Brandon Harris"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A mobile robotic chemist.

Nature 2020 07 8;583(7815):237-241. Epub 2020 Jul 8.

Leverhulme Centre for Functional Materials Design, Materials Innovation Factory and Department of Chemistry, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK.

Technologies such as batteries, biomaterials and heterogeneous catalysts have functions that are defined by mixtures of molecular and mesoscale components. As yet, this multi-length-scale complexity cannot be fully captured by atomistic simulations, and the design of such materials from first principles is still rare. Likewise, experimental complexity scales exponentially with the number of variables, restricting most searches to narrow areas of materials space. Robots can assist in experimental searches but their widespread adoption in materials research is challenging because of the diversity of sample types, operations, instruments and measurements required. Here we use a mobile robot to search for improved photocatalysts for hydrogen production from water. The robot operated autonomously over eight days, performing 688 experiments within a ten-variable experimental space, driven by a batched Bayesian search algorithm. This autonomous search identified photocatalyst mixtures that were six times more active than the initial formulations, selecting beneficial components and deselecting negative ones. Our strategy uses a dexterous free-roaming robot, automating the researcher rather than the instruments. This modular approach could be deployed in conventional laboratories for a range of research problems beyond photocatalysis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41586-020-2442-2DOI Listing
July 2020

Phakomatous Choristoma of the Orbit With Involvement of the Inferior Oblique Muscle.

Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg 2019 Jan/Feb;35(1):e10-e9

Department of Ophthalmology, Fort Belvoir Community Hospital, Fort Belvoir, Virginia, U.S.A.

The authors report a case of phakomatous choristoma presenting as an orbital tumor with involvement of the inferior oblique muscle. This is the only known case of this rare tumor directly invading and incorporating the inferior oblique. This tumor should be included in the differential of eyelid tumors and orbital tumors in infants. Finally, the authors review the histopathological and embryological characteristics of this lenticular tumor.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/IOP.0000000000001276DOI Listing
December 2019

Microtubule seams are not mechanically weak defects.

Phys Rev E 2018 Jun;97(6-1):062408

Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, La Crosse, Wisconsin 54601, USA.

Microtubule rigidity is important for many cellular functions to support extended structures and rearrange materials within the cell. The arrangement of the tubulin dimers within the microtubule can be altered to affect the protofilament number and the lattice type. Prior electron microscopy measurements have shown that when polymerized in the presence of a high concentration of NaCl, microtubules were more likely to be ten protofilaments with altered intertubulin lattice types. Specifically, such high-salt microtubules have a higher percentage of seam defects. Such seams have long been speculated to be a mechanically weak location in the microtubule lattice, yet no experimental evidence supported this claim. We directly measured the persistence length of freely fluctuating filaments made either with high salt or without. We found that the microtubules made with high salt were more flexible, by a factor of 2, compared to those polymerized the same way without salt present. The reduced persistence length of the high-salt microtubules can be accounted for entirely by a smaller cross-sectional radius of these microtubules, implying that the mixed lattice interactions have little effect on the bending rigidity. Our results suggest that the microtubule seam is not weaker than the typical lattice structure as previously speculated from structural studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevE.97.062408DOI Listing
June 2018

Hemorrhagic Stroke in a Young Healthy Male Following Use of Pre-Workout Supplement Animal Rage XL.

Mil Med 2017 09;182(9):e2030-e2033

Department of Ophthalmology, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889-56611.

So-called "pre-workout" supplements are substances marketed as natural dietary supplements with claims of helping athletes achieve more focused and intense workouts. The use of such products remains popular among American youth as a whole, but is especially high among active duty service members. Supplements are minimally regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and unlike pharmaceuticals, supplements are often brought to market without any testing to show neither efficacy nor safety. Several case reports have documented serious adverse events and raise the question of whether supplement use was a causative factor. Reported events occurring after use of pre-workout supplements include, among others, ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, myocardial infarction, hepatitis, and death. Here, we present the case of a healthy 25-year-old active duty male who experienced a bilateral cerebellar hemorrhagic stroke occurring shortly after taking a supplement named Animal Rage XL. Hemorrhagic stroke occurring in a healthy 25-year-old male with no risk factors is exceedingly rare. This is the first known case of stroke temporally associated with this particular supplement, which is currently available for purchase at military exchanges. Additionally, several of the active ingredients in this supplement have been shown to cause hypertension, tachycardia, and vasospasm. All of these effects could increase the likelihood and severity of a hemorrhagic stroke. The investigated ingredients in this abstract include β-phenethylamine, creatine-monophosphate, and caffeine.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7205/MILMED-D-17-00013DOI Listing
September 2017

Mercury BLASTP: Accelerating Protein Sequence Alignment.

ACM Trans Reconfigurable Technol Syst 2008 Jun;1(2)

Dept. of Computer Science and Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis.

Large-scale protein sequence comparison is an important but compute-intensive task in molecular biology. BLASTP is the most popular tool for comparative analysis of protein sequences. In recent years, an exponential increase in the size of protein sequence databases has required either exponentially more running time or a cluster of machines to keep pace. To address this problem, we have designed and built a high-performance FPGA-accelerated version of BLASTP, Mercury BLASTP. In this paper, we describe the architecture of the portions of the application that are accelerated in the FPGA, and we also describe the integration of these FPGA-accelerated portions with the existing BLASTP software. We have implemented Mercury BLASTP on a commodity workstation with two Xilinx Virtex-II 6000 FPGAs. We show that the new design runs 11-15 times faster than software BLASTP on a modern CPU while delivering close to 99% identical results.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1371579.1371581DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2615407PMC
June 2008
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