Publications by authors named "Brady Hamilton"

82 Publications

Births in the United States, 2019.

NCHS Data Brief 2020 Oct(387):1-8

This report presents selected highlights from 2019 final birth data on key demographic, health care utilization, and infant health indicators. General fertility rates (the number of births per 1,000 women aged 15-44), prenatal care timing (the percentage of mothers with first trimester care), source of payment for the delivery (the percentage of births covered by Medicaid), and preterm birth rates are presented. All indicators are compared between 2018 and 2019 and are presented for all births and for the three largest race and Hispanic-origin groups: non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic.
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October 2020

State Teen Birth Rates by Race and Hispanic Origin: United States, 2017-2018.

Authors:
Brady E Hamilton

Natl Vital Stat Rep 2020 Jul;69(6):1-12

Objectives-This report presents changes in state-specific birth rates for teenagers between 2017 and 2018 by race and Hispanic origin of mother. Methods-Data are from birth certificates of the 50 states and the District of Columbia (D.C.). Teen birth rates, the number of births to females aged 15-19 per 1,000 females aged 15-19, are shown by state for all births and for non-Hispanic single-race white, non-Hispanic single-race black, and Hispanic females for 2017 and 2018. Results-Birth rates for females aged 15-19 declined in 38 states between 2017 and 2018; nonsignificant declines were reported in eight additional states and D.C. Among non-Hispanic white teenagers, rates declined in 29 states between 2017 and 2018; nonsignificant declines were reported in 16 additional states. Teen birth rates for non-Hispanic black females declined in 10 states between 2017 and 2018; nonsignificant declines were seen in 21 additional states and D.C. For Hispanic teenagers, birth rates declined in 10 states between 2017 and 2018; nonsignificant declines were reported in 30 additional states and D.C. The magnitude of change between 2017 and 2018 varied by state for each race and Hispanic-origin group.
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July 2020

Births: Final Data for 2018.

Natl Vital Stat Rep 2019 Nov;68(13):1-47

Objectives-This report presents 2018 data on U.S. births according to a wide variety of characteristics. Trends in fertility patterns and maternal and infant characteristics are described and interpreted. Methods-Descriptive tabulations of data reported on the birth certificates of the 3.79 million births that occurred in 2018 are presented. Data are presented for maternal age, live-birth order, race and Hispanic origin, marital status, tobacco use, prenatal care, source of payment for the delivery, method of delivery, gestational age, birthweight, and plurality. Selected data by mother's state of residence and birth rates by age also are shown. Trend data for 2010 through 2018 are presented for selected items. Trend data by race and Hispanic origin are shown for 2016-2018. Results-3,791,712 births were registered in the United States in 2018, down 2% from 2017. Compared with rates in 2017, the general fertility rate declined to 59.1 births per 1,000 women aged 15-44. The birth rate for females aged 15-19 fell 7% in 2018. Birth rates declined for women aged 20-34 and increased for women aged 35-44. The total fertility rate declined to 1,729.5 births per 1,000 women in 2018. Birth rates for both married and unmarried women declined from 2017 to 2018. The percentage of women who began prenatal care in the first trimester of pregnancy rose to 77.5% in 2018; the percentage of all women who smoked during pregnancy declined to 6.5%. The cesarean delivery rate decreased to 31.9% in 2018 following an increase in 2017. Medicaid was the source of payment for 42.3% of all 2018 births, down 2% from 2017. The preterm birth rate rose for the fourth straight year to 10.02% in 2018; the rate of low birthweight was unchanged at 8.28%. Twin and triplet and higher-order multiple birth rates declined in 2018 (Figure 1).
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November 2019

Births in the United States, 2018.

NCHS Data Brief 2019 Jul(346):1-8

This report presents selected highlights from 2018 final birth data on key demographic, health care utilization, and infant health indicators. General fertility rates (the number of births per 1,000 women aged 15-44) and teen birth rates are presented. Also shown are the distribution of births with a previous cesarean delivery (vaginal births after previous cesarean [VBAC] and repeat cesarean delivery) and the distribution of births by gestational age. All indicators are compared between 2017 and 2018 and are presented for the three largest race and Hispanic-origin groups: non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic.
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July 2019

Educational Attainment of Mothers Aged 25 and Over: United States, 2017.

NCHS Data Brief 2019 Feb(332):1-8

Maternal education has been shown to be associated with the number of children a woman has during her childbearing years, as well as maternal and infant health (1-5). Using 2017 national birth certificate data, this report describes educational attainment of mothers aged 25 and over, overall and by race and Hispanic origin and state, and the mean numbers of live births by mothers' educational attainment.
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February 2019

Births: Final Data for 2017.

Natl Vital Stat Rep 2018 Nov;67(8):1-50

Objectives-This report presents 2017 data on U.S. births according to a wide variety of characteristics. Trends in fertility patterns and maternal and infant characteristics are described and interpreted. Methods-Descriptive tabulations of data reported on the birth certificates of the 3.86 million births that occurred in 2017 are presented. Data are presented for maternal age, livebirth order, race and Hispanic origin, marital status, tobacco use, prenatal care, source of payment for the delivery, method of delivery, gestational age, birthweight, and plurality. Selected data by mother's state of residence and birth rates by age also are shown. Trend data for 2010 to 2017 are presented for selected items. Trend data by race and Hispanic origin are shown for 2016 and 2017. Results- A total of 3,855,500 births were registered in the United States in 2017, down 2% from 2016. Compared with rates in 2016, the general fertility rate declined to 60.3 births per 1,000 women aged 15-44. The birth rate for females aged 15-19 fell 7% in 2017. Birth rates declined for women in their 20s and 30s but increased for women in their early 40s. The total fertility rate declined to 1,765.5 births per 1,000 women in 2017. Birth rates for both married and unmarried women declined from 2016 to 2017. The percentage of women who began prenatal care in the first trimester of pregnancy rose to 77.3% in 2017; the percentage of all women who smoked during pregnancy declined to 6.9%. The cesarean delivery rate increased to 32.0% following 4 years of declines. Medicaid was the source of payment for 43.0% of all births in 2017, up 1% from 2016. The preterm birth rate rose for the third straight year, as did the rate of low birthweight. Twin and triplet and higher-order multiple birth rates were essentially stable in 2017.
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November 2018

Total Fertility Rates by State and Race and Hispanic Origin: United States, 2017.

Natl Vital Stat Rep 2019 Jan;68(1):1-11

Objectives-This report presents 2017 total fertility rates by state of residence and race and Hispanic origin of mother for the United States. Methods-Data are from birth certificates of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Total fertility rates, the expected number of lifetime births per 1,000 women given current birth rates by age, are shown by state for all births, and for non-Hispanic single-race white, non-Hispanic single-race black, and Hispanic women for 2017. Results-Total fertility rates varied by state for each race and Hispanic-origin group. In 2017, South Dakota (2,227.5) had the highest total fertility rate of the 50 states and the District of Columbia; the District of Columbia had the lowest (1,421.0). For non-Hispanic white women, the highest total fertility rate was in Utah (2,099.5) and the lowest in the District of Columbia (1,012.0). Among non-Hispanic black women, the highest total fertility rate was in Maine (4,003.5) and the lowest in Wyoming (1,146.0) along with California (1,503.5), Connecticut (1,575.5), Montana (1,641.0), New Mexico (1,651.0), New York (1,574.5), Rhode Island (1,594.0), and West Virginia (1,579.5). For Hispanic women, the highest total fertility rate was in Alabama (3,085.0) and the lowest in Vermont (1,200.5) and Maine (1,281.5).
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January 2019

Trends in Fertility and Mother's Age at First Birth Among Rural and Metropolitan Counties: United States, 2007-2017.

NCHS Data Brief 2018 Oct(323):1-8

Since the most recent peak in the total fertility rate (the estimated number of lifetime births expected per 1,000 women) in 2007, the United States has experienced a decreasing total fertility rate and an increasing mean, or average, age of mothers at first birth (1-4). Previous research shows rural areas have persistently higher fertility and worse birth outcomes compared with metropolitan (metro) areas (2,5-8). This report describes trends and differences in total fertility rates and mean maternal age at first birth overall, and by race and Hispanic origin, between rural and small or medium metro, and rural and large metro counties, from 2007 through 2017.
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October 2018

National Center for Health Statistics Data Presentation Standards for Proportions.

Vital Health Stat 2 2017 Aug(175):1-22

The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) disseminates information on a broad range of health topics through diverse publications. These publications must rely on clear and transparent presentation standards that can be broadly and efficiently applied. Standards are particularly important for large, cross-cutting reports where estimates cannot be individually evaluated and indicators of precision cannot be included alongside the estimates. This report describes the NCHS Data Presentation Standards for Proportions. The multistep NCHS Data Presentation Standards for Proportions are based on a minimum denominator sample size and on the absolute and relative widths of a confidence interval calculated using the Clopper-Pearson method. Proportions (usually multiplied by 100 and expressed as percentages) are the most commonly reported estimates in NCHS reports.
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August 2017

Births in the United States, 2017.

NCHS Data Brief 2018 Aug(318):1-8

This report presents selected highlights from 2017 final birth data on key demographic, health care utilization, and infant health indicators. General fertility rates (the number of births per 1,000 females aged 15-44 years) and teen birth rates are presented by race and Hispanic origin. The use of Medicaid as the source of payment for the delivery and preterm birth rates are presented by the age of the mother. Data for 2017 are compared with 2016 for each indicator.
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August 2018

National Center for Health Statistics Guidelines for Analysis of Trends.

Vital Health Stat 2 2018 Apr(179):1-71

Many reports present analyses of trends over time based on multiple years of data from National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) surveys and the National Vital Statistics System (NVSS). Trend analyses of NCHS data involve analytic choices that can lead to different conclusions about the trends. This report discusses issues that should be considered when conducting a time trend analysis using NCHS data and presents guidelines for making trend analysis choices. Trend analysis issues discussed include: choosing the observed time points to include in the analysis, considerations for survey data and vital records data (record level and aggregated), a general approach for conducting trend analyses, assorted other analytic issues, and joinpoint regression. This report provides 12 guidelines for trend analyses, examples of analyses using NCHS survey and vital records data, statistical details for some analysis issues, and SAS and SUDAAN code for specification of joinpoint regression models. Several an lytic choices must be made during the course of a trend analysis, and the choices made can affect the results. This report highlights the strengths and limitations of different choices and presents guidelines for making some of these choices. While this report focuses on time trend analyses, the issues discussed and guidelines presented are applicable to trend analyses involving other ordinal and interval variables.
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April 2018

Births: Final Data for 2016.

Natl Vital Stat Rep 2018 Jan;67(1):1-55

This report presents 2016 data on U.S. births according to a wide variety of characteristics. Trends in fertility patterns and maternal and infant characteristics are described and interpreted.Descriptive tabulations of data reported on the birth certificates of the 3.95 million births that occurred in 2016 are presented. Data are presented for maternal age, live-birth order, race and Hispanic origin, marital status, tobacco use, prenatal care, source of payment for the delivery, method of delivery, gestational age, birthweight, and plurality. Selected data by mother's state of residence and birth rates by age also are shown. Trend data for 2010-2016 are presented for selected items. A total of 3,945,875 births were registered in the United States in 2016, down 1% from 2015. Compared with rates in 2015, the general fertility rate declined to 62.0 per 1,000 women aged 15-44. The birth rate for females aged 15-19 fell 9% in 2016. Birth rates declined for women in their 20s but increased for women intheir 30s and early 40s. The total fertility rate declined to 1,820.5 births per 1,000 women in 2016. The birth rate for unmarried women declined, while the rate for married women increased. More than three-quarters of women began prenatal care in the firsttrimester of pregnancy (77.1%) in 2016, while 7.2% of all women smoked during pregnancy. The cesarean delivery rate declined for the fourth year in a row. Medicaid was the source of payment for 42.6% of all 2016 births. The preterm birth rate rose for the second straight year, and the rate of low birthweight increased 1%. Twin and triplet and higher-order multiple birth rates declined, although the changes were not statistically significant.
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January 2018

Declines in Births to Females Aged 10-14 in the United States, 2000-2016.

NCHS Data Brief 2018 Apr(308):1-8

The birth rate for teen mothers aged 15-19 declined 57% from 2000 through 2016. During this time, the rate for young adolescent mothers aged 10-14 also declined. Childbearing by very young mothers is a matter of public concern because of the elevated health risks for these mothers and their infants and the socioeconomic consequences. This report describes recent trends and variations in births to young mothers aged 10-14 by race and Hispanic origin and state.
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April 2018

Streamlining the Medication Review Process by Use of a New Review Tool: CHART.

Consult Pharm 2018 Jan;33(1):33-36

Banner Health, Phoenix, Arizona, USA.

Objective: The Carlson-Hamilton Adult Medication Review Tool (CHART) represents an effort to improve the approach to geriatric care by streamlining the medication review process and identifying potential medication issues that may be relevant to patient's cognitive presentation and impact clinical decision making.

Setting: CHART was created at a behavioral health facility. The most common primary diagnoses on this unit include new onset psychosis and recent mental status changes.

Practice Description: This facility contains 155 beds divided into six units. The geriatric unit has an average census of 10 patients, with an average length of stay of 10 to 12 days.

Practice Innovation: This site is working to improve geriatric patient care by simplifying and streamlining the medication review process.

Main Outcome Measurements: The pharmacy team evaluated change in medication burden and change in medication review requests.

Results: Following implementation, this facility saw both a decreased medication burden and an increase in medication review requests.

Conclusion: CHART is a tool that allows pharmacists and student pharmacists to streamline the review of medications and make recommendations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4140/TCP.n.2018.33DOI Listing
January 2018

Births in the United States, 2016.

NCHS Data Brief 2017 09(287):1-8

This report presents several key demographic and maternal and infant health indicators using 2016 final birth data. Trends in the general fertility rate (the number of births per 1,000 women aged 15–44), age-specific birth rates, cesarean delivery, preterm, and triplet and higher-order multiple birth rates are presented by age of mother. For each indicator, data for 2016 are compared with 2015, and also with a year representing a recent high or low rate.
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September 2017

Spatiotemporal trends in teen birth rates in the USA, 2003-2012.

J R Stat Soc Ser A Stat Soc 2018 01 19;181(1):35-58. Epub 2017 Jan 19.

National Center for Health Statistics, Hyattsville, USA.

The objective of this analysis was to explore temporal and spatial variation in teen birth rates TBRs across counties in the USA, from 2003 to 2012, by using hierarchical Bayesian models. Prior examination of spatiotemporal variation in TBRs has been limited by the reliance on large-scale geographies such as states, because of the potential instability in TBRs at smaller geographical scales such as counties. We implemented hierarchical Bayesian models with space-time interaction terms and spatially structured and unstructured random effects to produce smoothed county level TBR estimates, allowing for examination of spatiotemporal patterns and trends in TBRs at a smaller geographic scale across the USA. The results may help to highlight US counties where TBRs are higher or lower and to inform efforts to reduce birth rates to adolescents in the USA further.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5464734PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/rssa.12266DOI Listing
January 2018

Hot spots, cluster detection and spatial outlier analysis of teen birth rates in the U.S., 2003-2012.

Spat Spatiotemporal Epidemiol 2017 06 27;21:67-75. Epub 2017 Mar 27.

RADARS SYSTEM/Rocky Mountain Poison & Drug Center (RMPDC)/A Division of Denver Health, 990 Bannock Street M/C 0180 | Denver, CO 80204, USA.

Teen birth rates have evidenced a significant decline in the United States over the past few decades. Most of the states in the US have mirrored this national decline, though some reports have illustrated substantial variation in the magnitude of these decreases across the U.S. Importantly, geographic variation at the county level has largely not been explored. We used National Vital Statistics Births data and Hierarchical Bayesian space-time interaction models to produce smoothed estimates of teen birth rates at the county level from 2003-2012. Results indicate that teen birth rates show evidence of clustering, where hot and cold spots occur, and identify spatial outliers. Findings from this analysis may help inform efforts targeting the prevention efforts by illustrating how geographic patterns of teen birth rates have changed over the past decade and where clusters of high or low teen birth rates are evident.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sste.2017.03.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5618106PMC
June 2017

Trends and Variations in Reproduction and Intrinsic Rates: United States, 1990-2014.

Natl Vital Stat Rep 2017 Feb;66(2):1-14

Objective-This report presents trends in reproduction and intrinsic rates from 1990 through 2014. In addition, total fertility and gross reproduction rates by race and Hispanic-origin group are presented from 1990 through 2014, and net reproduction and intrinsic rates for selected race and Hispanic-origin group are presented from 2006 through 2014. Methods-Tabular and graphic data on the trends in the reproduction and intrinsic rates for the United States, by race and Hispanic origin of mother, are presented and described. Results-Rates of reproduction (total fertility, gross reproduction, and net reproduction), the intrinsic rate of natural increase, and the intrinsic birth rate were lower in 2014 than 1990. After a steady decline from 1990 through 1997, all rates increased from 1997 through 2007 but declined again from 2007 through 2013. The rates increased between 2013 and 2014. Among the race and Hispanic subgroups examined, the total fertility and gross reproduction rates were lower for all groups in 2014 compared with 1990. The net reproduction rate, intrinsic rate of natural increase, and intrinsic birth rate for the selected groups non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic declined from 2006 through 2014.
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February 2017

Births: Final Data for 2015.

Natl Vital Stat Rep 2017 Jan;66(1)

Objectives-This report presents 2015 data on U.S. births according to a wide variety of characteristics. Data are presented for maternal age, live-birth order, race and Hispanic origin, marital status, attendant at birth, method of delivery, period of gestation, birthweight, and plurality. Selected data by mother's state of residence and birth rates by age and race of father also are shown. Trends in fertility patterns and maternal and infant characteristics are described and interpreted. Methods-Descriptive tabulations of data reported on the birth certificates of the 3.98 million births that occurred in 2015 are presented. Results-In 2015, 3,978,497 births were registered in the United States, down less than 1% from 2014. The general fertility rate was 62.5 per 1,000 women aged 15-44, a decline of 1% from 2014. The birth rate for teenagers aged 15-19 fell 8% in 2015, to 22.3 per 1,000 females. Birth rates declined for women in their 20s but increased for women in their 30s and early 40s. The total fertility rate (estimated number of births over a woman's lifetime) declined to 1,843.5 births per 1,000 women in 2015. The birth rate for unmarried women declined for the seventh straight year to 43.5 per 1,000. The cesarean delivery rate declined for the third year in a row to 32.0%. The preterm birth rate increased slightly from 2014, to 9.63% in 2015, as did the rate of low birthweight (8.07% in 2015). The twin birth rate declined to 33.5 per 1,000; the triplet and higher-order multiple birth rate was down 9% to 103.6 per 100,000.
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January 2017

Teen Birth Rates for Urban and Rural Areas in the United States, 2007-2015.

NCHS Data Brief 2016 Nov(264):1-8

Key Findings: Data from the National Vital Statistics System •Birth rates for teenagers aged 15-19 declined in urban and rural counties from 2007 through 2015, with the largest declines in large urban counties and the smallest declines in rural counties. •From 2007 through 2015, the teen birth rate was lowest in large urban counties and highest in rural counties. •Declines in teen birth rates in all urban counties between 2007 and 2015 were largest in Arizona, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Minnesota, and Colorado, with 17 states experiencing a decline of 50% or more. •Declines in teen birth rates in all rural counties between 2007 and 2015 were largest (50% or more) in Colorado and Connecticut. •In 2015, teen birth rates were highest in rural counties and lowest in large urban counties for non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic females. Teen birth rates have demonstrated an unprecedented decline in the United States since 2007 (1). Declines occurred in all states and among all major racial and Hispanic-origin groups, yet disparities by both geography and demographic characteristics persist (2,3). Although teen birth rates and related declines have been described by state, patterns by urban-rural location have not yet been examined. This report describes trends in teen birth rates in urban (metropolitan) and rural (nonmetropolitan) areas in the United States overall and by state from 2007 through 2015 and by race and Hispanic origin for 2015.
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November 2016

Continued Declines in Teen Births in the United States, 2015.

NCHS Data Brief 2016 Sep(259):1-8

Key Findings: •The teen birth rate declined to another historic low for the United States in 2015, down 8% from 2014 to 22.3 births per 1,000 females aged 15-19. •The birth rates for teenagers aged 15-17 and 18-19 declined in 2015 to 9.9 and 40.7, respectively, which are record lows for both groups. •In 2015, birth rates declined to 6.9 for Asian or Pacific Islander, 16.0 for non-Hispanic white, 25.7 for American Indian or Alaska Native, 31.8 for non-Hispanic black, and 34.9 for Hispanic female teenagers aged 15-19. •Birth rates fell to record lows for nearly all race and Hispanic-origin groups of females aged 15-19, 15-17, and 18-19 in 2015. The birth rate for teenagers aged 15-19 has fallen almost continuously since 1991, reaching historic lows for the nation every year since 2009 (1-4). Despite declines in all racial and ethnic groups, teen birth rates continue to vary considerably by race and ethnicity. Moreover, the U.S. teen birth rate remains higher than in other industrialized countries (5). Childbearing by teenagers continues to be a matter of public concern. This report presents the recent and long-term trends and disparity in teen childbearing by race and Hispanic origin.
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September 2016

Births in the United States, 2015.

NCHS Data Brief 2016 Sep(258):1-8

Key Findings: Data from the National Vital Statistics System •There were 3.978 million births in the United States in 2015, down less than 1% from 2014. •The 2015 U.S. general fertility rate (births per 1,000 women aged 15-44) was down 1% from 2014. •Birth rates dropped in 2015 to record lows among women under age 30 and rose for those aged 30-44. •The cesarean delivery rate declined to 32.0% of births in 2015; the preterm birth rate rose slightly to 9.63% from 2014 to 2015. This report presents several key demographic and maternal and infant health indicators using 2015 final birth data. Trends in general fertility rates, age-specific birth rates, cesarean and low-risk cesarean delivery, and preterm birth rates are presented. Data are from the national vital statistics birth files.
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September 2016

Births: Preliminary Data for 2015.

Natl Vital Stat Rep 2016 Jun;65(3):1-15

Objectives-This report presents preliminary 2015 data on U.S. births. Births are shown by age and race and Hispanic origin of mother. Data on marital status, cesarean delivery, preterm births, and low birthweight are also presented.
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June 2016

Mean Age of Mothers is on the Rise: United States, 2000-2014.

NCHS Data Brief 2016 Jan(232):1-8

Key Findings: Data from the National Vital Statistics System. The mean age of mothers has increased from 2000 to 2014 for all birth orders, with age at first birth having the largest increase, up from 24.9 years in 2000 to 26.3 years in 2014. Increases in the average age for all birth orders were most pronounced from 2009 to 2014. In 2014, Asian or Pacific Islander mothers had the oldest average age at first birth (29.5 years), while American Indian or Alaska Native mothers had the youngest (23.1 years). Mean age at first birth increased in all states and the District of Columbia (D.C.) from 2000 to 2014, but D.C. (3.4 years) and Oregon had the largest increases (2.1 years).
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January 2016

Births: Final Data for 2014.

Natl Vital Stat Rep 2015 Dec;64(12):1-64

This report presents 2014 data on U.S. births according to a wide variety of characteristics. Data are presented for maternal age, live-birth order, race and Hispanic origin, marital status, attendant at birth, method of delivery, period of gestation, birthweight, and plurality. Birth and fertility rates are presented by age, live-birth order, race and Hispanic origin, and marital status. Selected data by mother's state of residence and birth rates by age and race of father also are shown. Trends in fertility patterns and maternal and infant characteristics are described and interpreted.
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December 2015

Births in the United States, 2014.

NCHS Data Brief 2015 Sep(216):1-8

For the first year since 2007, childbearing rose in the United States in 2014, albeit slightly. Trends differed by race and Hispanic origin, with the GFR up among non-Hispanic white and API women but down or unchanged among other groups for 2013–2014. Historical lows in teen childbearing were seen in the U.S. overall in 2014, and for each of the race and Hispanic origin groups. Following years of steady increases that totaled nearly 60% (3), the U.S. cesarean delivery rate declined for the second straight year. Cesarean delivery rates had been on the decline for several years for non-Hispanic white and API women, but 2014 marks the first year of decline in cesarean deliveries among non-Hispanic black and Hispanic women. Preterm birth rates continued to trend downward in 2014 (2), overall and among most race and Hispanic origin groups, but large differences among groups in the risk of preterm birth were observed. The forthcoming report, "Births: Final data for 2014" (4), will present more information on the topics addressed in this report and selected others.
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September 2015

Births: Preliminary Data for 2014.

Natl Vital Stat Rep 2015 Jun;64(6):1-19

Division of Vital Statistics.

Objectives-This report presents preliminary 2014 data on U.S. births. Births are shown by age, live-birth order, race, and Hispanic origin of mother. Data on marital status, cesarean delivery, preterm births, and low birthweight are also presented.
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June 2015

Births: final data for 2013.

Natl Vital Stat Rep 2015 Jan;64(1):1-65

Objectives: This report presents 2013 data on U.S. births according to a wide variety of characteristics. Data are presented for maternal age, live-birth order, race and Hispanic origin, marital status, attendant at birth, method of delivery, period of gestation, birthweight, and plurality. Birth and fertility rates are presented by age, live-birth order, race and Hispanic origin, and marital status. Selected data by mother's state of residence and birth rates by age and race of father also are shown. Trends in fertility patterns and maternal and infant characteristics are described and interpreted.

Methods: Descriptive tabulations of data reported on the birth certificates of the 3.93 million U.S. births that occurred in 2013 are presented.

Results: A total of 3,932,181 births were registered in the United States in 2013, down less than 1% from 2012. The general fertility rate declined to 62.5 per 1,000 women aged 15-44. The teen birth rate fell 10%, to 26.5 per 1,000 women aged 15-19. Birth rates declined for women in their 20s and increased for most age groups of women aged 30 and over. The total fertility rate (estimated number of births over a woman's lifetime) declined 1% to 1,857.5 per 1,000 women. Measures of unmarried childbearing were down in 2013 from 2012. The cesarean delivery rate declined to 32.7%. The preterm birth rate declined for the seventh straight year to 11.39%, but the low birthweight rate was essentially unchanged at 8.02%. The twin birth rate rose 2% to 33.7 per 1,000 births; the triplet and higher-order multiple birth rate dropped 4% to 119.5 per 100,000 total births.
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January 2015

Births in the United States, 2013.

NCHS Data Brief 2014 Dec(175):1-8

Childbearing is on the decline in the United States overall and among women under age 30 and women in each of the largest race and Hispanic origin groups. Childbearing continues to rise among older women, however, with rates for women aged 35 and over at the highest levels seen in approximately 50 years. After more than a decade of steady rises, cesarean delivery rates are trending slightly downward; a recent report revealed larger declines for 2009-2013 among women at low risk for cesarean delivery than for all women with cesareans. Following several years of relative stability, twinning rates were up for 2013; a recent report based on 2012 data revealed that triplet and higher-order multiple births have been trending sharply downward. Declines in the incidence of preterm deliveries, especially in conjunction with reductions in low birthweight (albeit modest) and in perinatal mortality, suggest some recent progress in improving pregnancy outcome in the United States. The forthcoming report "Births: Final Data for 2013" will present more information on the topics addressed in this report and selected others.
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December 2014

National and state patterns of teen births in the United States, 1940-2013.

Natl Vital Stat Rep 2014 Aug;63(4):1-34

Objectives: This report presents trends from 1940 through 2013 in national birth rates for teenagers, with particular focus on the period since 1991. The percent changes in rates for 1991-2012 and for 2007-2012 are presented for the United States and for states. Preliminary data for 2013 are shown where available.

Methods: Tabular and graphical descriptions of the trends in teen birth rates for the United States and each state, by age group, race, and Hispanic origin, are presented and discussed. Data are shown for the U.S. territories.

Results: Birth rates for U.S. teenagers have generally fallen in the United States since peaking in 1957. The rate fell 57% between 1991 and 2013. The 2013 preliminary rate (26.6 per 1,000 aged 15-19) is less than one-third of the historically highest rate (96.3 in 1957). During 1991-2012, rates fell for all race and Hispanic ethnicity groups, with the largest declines measured for non-Hispanic black teenagers. In the more recent period, 2007-2012, the declines have been steepest for Hispanic teenagers. Birth rates declined significantly for teenagers in all states during 1991-2012; during 2007-2012, rates fell for all but two states. The drop in teen birth rates translates into an estimated 4 million fewer births to teenagers from 1992 through 2012. The declines in teen birth rates reflect a number of behavioral changes, including decreased sexual activity, increases in the use of contraception at first sex and at most recent sex, and the adoption and increased use of hormonal contraception, injectables, and intrauterine devices.
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August 2014