Publications by authors named "Bonita Stanton"

283 Publications

Integrating General Child Health Care and Mental Health Care in Pediatric Primary Care Settings.

Authors:
Bonita F Stanton

Pediatr Clin North Am 2021 Jun;68(3):xv-xvi

Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine, Academic Enterprise, Hackensack Meridian Health, Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine, 123 Metro Boulevard, Nutley, NJ 07110, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2021.04.008DOI Listing
June 2021

Adolescent HIV-related behavioural prediction using machine learning: a foundation for precision HIV prevention.

AIDS 2021 05;35(Suppl 1):S75-S84

Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine, Nutley, New Jersey, USA.

Background: Precision prevention is increasingly important in HIV prevention research to move beyond universal interventions to those tailored for high-risk individuals. The current study was designed to develop machine learning algorithms for predicting adolescent HIV risk behaviours.

Methods: Comprehensive longitudinal data on adolescent risk behaviours, perceptions, peer and family influence, and neighbourhood risk factors were collected from 2564 grade-10 students at baseline followed for 24 months over 2008-2012. Machine learning techniques [support vector machine (SVM) and random forests] were applied to innovatively leverage longitudinal data for robust HIV risk behaviour prediction. In this study, we focused on two adolescent risk behaviours: had ever had sex and had multiple sex partners. Twenty percent of the data were withheld for model testing.

Results: The SVM model with cost-sensitive learning achieved the highest sensitivity, at 79.1%, specificity of 75.4% with AUC of 0.86 in predicting multiple sex partners on the training data (10-fold cross-validation), and sensitivity of 79.7%, specificity of 76.5% with AUC of 0.86 on the testing data. The random forest model obtained the best performance in predicting had ever had sex, yielding the sensitivity of 78.5%, specificity of 73.1% with AUC of 0.84 on the training data and sensitivity of 82.7%, specificity of 75.3% with AUC of 0.87 on the testing data.

Conclusion: Machine learning methods can be used to build effective prediction model(s) to identify adolescents who are likely to engage in HIV risk behaviours. This study builds a foundation for targeted intervention strategies and informs precision prevention efforts in school-setting.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/QAD.0000000000002867DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8133351PMC
May 2021

Medical Students on the Virtual Front Line: A Literature Review Elective to Provide COVID-19 Clinical Teams With Essential Information.

Acad Med 2021 Mar 16. Epub 2021 Mar 16.

J.R. Boscamp is vice dean and professor of pediatrics, Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine, Nutley, New Jersey. C.P. Duffy is associate dean of the Interprofessional Health Sciences Library, Interprofessional Health Sciences Campus, Nutley, New Jersey. C. Barsky is executive vice president and chief quality officer, Hackensack Meridian Health, Edison, New Jersey, and professor of emergency medicine, Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine, Nutley, New Jersey. B. F. Stanton is founding dean and professor of pediatrics, Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine, Nutley, New Jersey.

Problem: At the Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine (HMSOM) in New Jersey, clinical activities for students were suspended on March 15, 2020, due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Clinical teams at Hackensack Meridian Health (HMH) needed resources for identifying and assimilating the medical literature regarding COVID-19, which was expanding and evolving daily. HMH leaders reached out to HMSOM leaders for assistance. The HMSOM leadership and faculty quickly organized a literature review elective.

Approach: Eight second-year medical students participated in a literature review elective course to research and synthesize the COVID-19 clinical literature to provide synopses of best practices for various clinical teams. By March 23, students were searching the literature and writing reports independently, mentored by a senior dean (an infectious diseases specialist) and supported by the associate dean of libraries and library team. The library team updated and categorized student reports daily on a website dedicated to the elective.

Outcomes: During the 6-week elective, 8 students produced 70 reports synthesizing the emerging COVID-19 literature to help answer practitioners' clinical questions in real time. One student report was posted on the American Academy of Ophthalmology website. All 70 were published online in Elsevier's health education faculty hub. On course evaluations, students expressed regret about not being directly involved in patient care, but articulated their gratitude to be able to contribute to the clinical teams.

Next Steps: In June 2020, the students returned to their clinical clerkships as COVID-19 clinical volumes declined and PPE became more available. Students continued to be available to the clinical teams to assist with COVID-19 questions. This literature review elective can serve as a model for other medical schools to use to deploy students to help synthesize the evolving literature on COVID-19 or other rapidly emerging research topics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000004070DOI Listing
March 2021

A Twenty-First Century Policy Agenda: Violence in the Lives of Children, Families, and Communities.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2021 Apr 26;68(2):xv-xviii. Epub 2021 Jan 26.

Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine, 123 Metro Boulevard (formerly 340 Kingsland Street), Nutley, NJ 07110, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2021.01.001DOI Listing
April 2021

Global Burden of Violence.

Pediatr Clin North Am 2021 Apr 11;68(2):339-349. Epub 2021 Feb 11.

New York Academy of Medicine, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, SUNY Upstate Medical University, 1216 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10029, USA.

This article documents the increasing numbers of children impacted annually by 1 or more types of violence against children and describes the range of types of injuries and their immediate and long-term impacts on child outcomes. The article describes the growing number of international collaborations to decrease the numbers of children impacted by violence and to mitigate the consequences thereof, with a particular emphasis on children living in war zones.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2020.12.001DOI Listing
April 2021

Medical Education in the Age of COVID-19.

Authors:
Bonita Stanton

Acad Med 2021 May;96(5):e21

Founding dean, Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine, Nutley, New Jersey;

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000003890DOI Listing
May 2021

Pediatric Pulmonary Disorders: A Combination of Breakthroughs and New Disorders.

Authors:
Bonita F Stanton

Pediatr Clin North Am 2021 02;68(1):xvii-xviii

Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine, 340 Kingsland Street, Building 123, Nutley, NJ 07110, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2020.10.002DOI Listing
February 2021

Childhood Cancer Survival: So Much More Needs to be Done.

Authors:
Bonita F Stanton

Pediatr Clin North Am 2020 12;67(6):xvii-xviii

Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine at Seton Hall University, 340 Kingsland Street, Building 123, Nutley, NJ 07110, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2020.10.001DOI Listing
December 2020

Generations of Dedicated Researchers Resulting in Generations of Constant Progress: Pediatric Cardiology.

Authors:
Bonita F Stanton

Pediatr Clin North Am 2020 10 10;67(5):xv-xvi. Epub 2020 Aug 10.

Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine, 340 Kingsland Street, Building 123, Nutley, NJ 07110, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2020.07.008DOI Listing
October 2020

Bahamas National Implementation Project: Proposal for Sustainability of an Evidence-based HIV Prevention Intervention in a School Setting.

JMIR Res Protoc 2020 Aug 21;9(8):e14816. Epub 2020 Aug 21.

Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine, Seton Hall University, Nutley, NJ, United States.

Background: Sustained implementation of school-based prevention programs is low. Effective strategies are needed to enhance both high-level implementation fidelity and sustainability of prevention programs.

Objective: This proposed study aims to determine if the provision of either biweekly monitoring and feedback and site-based assistance and mentorship or both to at-risk and moderate-performing teachers with monitoring through an enhanced decision-making platform by the Ministry of Education (MOE) and Ministry of Health (MOH) based on the real-time implementation data will increase national implementation fidelity and result in sustained implementation over time.

Methods: This study will target government schools including 200 grade 6 teachers in 80 primary schools and 100 junior/middle high school teachers (and their classes) on 12 Bahamian islands. Teacher and school coordinator training will be conducted by the MOE in year 1, followed by an optimization trial among teachers in the capital island. Informed by these results, an implementation intervention will be conducted to train using different levels of educational intensity all at-risk and moderate-performing teachers. Subsequently selected training and implementation strategies will be evaluated for the national implementation of Focus on Youth in the Caribbean and Caribbean Informed Parents and Children Together in years 2 to 5.

Results: It is hypothesized that a more intensive training and supervision program for at-risk and moderate-performing teachers will enhance their implementation fidelity to the average level of the high-performing group (85%), an HIV prevention program delivered at the national level can be implemented with fidelity in grade 6 and sustained over time (monitored annually), and student outcomes will continue to be highly correlated with implementation fidelity and be sustained over time (assessed annually through grade 9). The proposed study is funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development from August 1, 2018, through May 31, 2023.

Conclusions: The study will explore several theory-driven implementation strategies to increase sustained teacher implementation fidelity and thereby increase the general public health impact of evidence-based interventions. The proposed project has potential to make significant contributions to advancing school-based HIV prevention research and implementation science and serve as a global model for the Fast Track strategy.

International Registered Report Identifier (irrid): PRR1-10.2196/14816.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2196/14816DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7474416PMC
August 2020

The Era of Telehealth Has Arrived.

Authors:
Bonita F Stanton

Pediatr Clin North Am 2020 08 19;67(4):xv-xvi. Epub 2020 Jun 19.

Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine at Seton Hall University, 340 Kingsland Street, Building 123, Nutley, NJ 07110, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2020.05.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7304398PMC
August 2020

Prevention: An Essential Part of Pediatrics.

Authors:
Bonita F Stanton

Pediatr Clin North Am 2020 06 4;67(3):xv-xvi. Epub 2020 May 4.

Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine at Seton Hall University, 340 Kingsland Street, Building 123, Nutley, NJ 07110, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2020.03.003DOI Listing
June 2020

The Vulnerable Child.

Authors:
Bonita F Stanton

Pediatr Clin North Am 2020 04;67(2):xv-xvi

Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine at Seton Hall University, Academic Enterprise, 340 Kingsland Street, Building 123, Nutley, NJ 07110, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2020.01.003DOI Listing
April 2020

Creating a Strong Infrastructure for Healthy Growth.

Authors:
Bonita F Stanton

Pediatr Clin North Am 2020 Feb;67(1):xv-xvi

Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine at Seton Hall University, Academic Enterprise, 340 Kingsland Street, Building 123, Nutley, NJ 07110, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2019.09.016DOI Listing
February 2020

Substance Abuse in the United States: It's Not New News.

Authors:
Bonita F Stanton

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 Dec;66(6):xv-xvi

Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine at Seton Hall University, 340 Kingsland Street, Building 123, Nutley, NJ 07110, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2019.08.016DOI Listing
December 2019

Improving the Youth HIV Prevention and Care Cascades: Innovative Designs in the Adolescent Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions.

AIDS Patient Care STDS 2019 09;33(9):388-398

Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California.

Dramatic decreases in HIV transmission are achievable with currently available biomedical and behavioral interventions, including antiretroviral therapy and pre-exposure prophylaxis. However, such decreases have not yet been realized among adolescents and young adults. The Adolescent Medicine Trials Network (ATN) for HIV/AIDS interventions is dedicated to research addressing the needs of youth at high risk for HIV acquisition as well as youth living with HIV. This article provides an overview of an array of efficient and effective designs across the translational spectrum that are utilized within the ATN. These designs maximize methodological rigor and real-world applicability of findings while minimizing resource use. Implementation science and cost-effectiveness methods are included. Utilizing protocol examples, we demonstrate the feasibility of such designs to balance rigor and relevance to shorten the science-to-practice gap and improve the youth HIV prevention and care continua.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/apc.2019.0095DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6745528PMC
September 2019

The Ever-Expanding Base of New Knowledge.

Authors:
Bonita F Stanton

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 Oct;66(5):xiii-xiv

Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine at Seton Hall University, Academic Enterprise, 340 Kingsland Street, Building 123, Nutley, NJ 07110, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2019.07.002DOI Listing
October 2019

How Did We Ever Do Without Them?

Authors:
Bonita F Stanton

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 08;66(4):xv-xvii

Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine at Seton Hall University, Academic Enterprise, 340 Kingsland Street, Building 123, Nutley, NJ 07110, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2019.05.002DOI Listing
August 2019

Delivering on the Promise of the Statue of Liberty.

Authors:
Bonita F Stanton

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 06;66(3):xv-xvi

Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine at Seton Hall University, 340 Kingsland Street, Building 123, Nutley, NJ 07110, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2019.03.016DOI Listing
June 2019

Model-Based Methods to Translate Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions Findings Into Policy Recommendations: Rationale and Protocol for a Modeling Core (ATN 161).

JMIR Res Protoc 2019 Apr 16;8(4):e9898. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

Medical Practice Evaluation Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, United States.

Background: The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that approximately 60,000 US youth are living with HIV. US youth living with HIV (YLWH) have poorer outcomes compared with adults, including lower rates of diagnosis, engagement, retention, and virologic suppression. With Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions (ATN) support, new trials of youth-centered interventions to improve retention in care and medication adherence among YLWH are underway.

Objective: This study aimed to use a computer simulation model, the Cost-Effectiveness of Preventing AIDS Complications (CEPAC)-Adolescent Model, to evaluate selected ongoing and forthcoming ATN interventions to improve viral load suppression among YLWH and to define the benchmarks for uptake, effectiveness, durability of effect, and cost that will make these interventions clinically beneficial and cost-effective.

Methods: This protocol, ATN 161, establishes the ATN Modeling Core. The Modeling Core leverages extensive data-already collected by successfully completed National Institutes of Health-supported studies-to develop novel approaches for modeling critical components of HIV disease and care in YLWH. As new data emerge from ongoing ATN trials during the award period about the effectiveness of novel interventions, the CEPAC-Adolescent simulation model will serve as a flexible tool to project their long-term clinical impact and cost-effectiveness. The Modeling Core will derive model input parameters and create a model structure that reflects key aspects of HIV acquisition, progression, and treatment in YLWH. The ATN Modeling Core Steering Committee, with guidance from ATN leadership and scientific experts, will select and prioritize specific model-based analyses as well as provide feedback on derivation of model input parameters and model assumptions. Project-specific teams will help frame research questions for model-based analyses as well as provide feedback regarding project-specific inputs, results, sensitivity analyses, and policy conclusions.

Results: This project was funded as of September 2017.

Conclusions: The ATN Modeling Core will provide critical information to guide the scale-up of ATN interventions and the translation of ATN data into policy recommendations for YLWH in the United States.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2196/resprot.9898DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6488956PMC
April 2019

A Deep Dive into What Is New and Needed in the Care of Preterm Newborn Care.

Authors:
Bonita F Stanton

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 04;66(2):xv-xvi

Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine at Seton Hall University, 340 Kingsland Street, Building 123, Nutley, NJ 07110, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2019.01.002DOI Listing
April 2019

Adolescent Trials Network for HIV-AIDS Scale It Up Program: Protocol for a Rational and Overview.

JMIR Res Protoc 2019 Feb 1;8(2):e11204. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine, Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ, United States.

Background: The past 30 years have witnessed such significant progress in the prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS that an AIDS-free generation and the end to the global AIDS epidemic are ambitious, but achievable, national and global goals. Despite growing optimism, globally, youth living with HIV are markedly less likely to receive antiretroviral therapy than adults (23% vs 38%). Furthermore, marked health disparities exist regarding HIV infection risk, with young men of color who have sex with men disproportionately affected. A large body of research has identified highly impactful facilitators of and barriers to behavior change. Several efficacious interventions have been created that decrease the rate of new HIV infections among youth and reduce morbidity among youth living with HIV. However, full benefits that should be possible based on the tools and interventions currently available are yet to be realized in youth, in large part, because efficacious interventions have not been implemented in real-world settings. Scale It Up (SIU) primarily aims to assemble research teams that will ultimately bring to practice evidence-based interventions that positively impact the youth HIV prevention and care cascades, and in turn, advance the fields of implementation science and self-management science.

Objective: This paper aims to describe the structure of the U19-SIU and the effectiveness-implementation hybrid trials, as well as other center-wide protocols and initiatives, implemented within SIU.

Methods: SIU will achieve its aims through 4 individual primary protocols, 2 center-wide protocols, and 3 cross-project initiatives.

Results: SIU was funded by National Institute for Child Health and Human Development (U19HD089875) and began in October 2016. As of November 2018, 6 SIU protocols have launched at least the first phase of work (ATN 144 SMART: Sequential Multiple Assignment Randomized Trial; ATN 145 YMHP: Young Men's Health Project; ATN 146 TMI: Tailored Motivational Interviewing Intervention; ATN 153 EPIS: Exploration, Preparation, Implementation, Sustainment model; ATN 154 CM: Cascade Monitoring; ATN 156 We Test: Couples' Communication and HIV Testing). Further details can be found in the individual protocol papers.

Conclusions: To date, the youth HIV research portfolio has not adequately advanced the important care area of self-management. SIU protocols and initiatives address this broad issue by focusing on evaluating the effectiveness and implementation of self-management interventions. SIU is highly innovative for 5 primary reasons: (1) our research framework expands the application of "self-management"; (2) the 4 primary protocols utilize innovative hybrid designs; (3) our Analytic Core will conduct cost-effectiveness analyses of each intervention; (4) across all 4 primary protocols, our Implementation Science Core will apply implementation scales designed to assess inner and outer context factors; and (5) we shall advance understanding of the dynamics between provider and patient through analysis of recorded interactions.

International Registered Report Identifier (irrid): DERR1-10.2196/11204.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2196/11204DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6376339PMC
February 2019

Dealing with the Challenges of the Good Fortune of an Abundance of New Knowledge.

Authors:
Bonita F Stanton

Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 02;66(1):xvii-xviii

Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine at Seton Hall University, 340 Kingsland Street, Building 123, Nutley, NJ 07110, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.10.003DOI Listing
February 2019

The Changing Role of Emergency Medicine.

Authors:
Bonita F Stanton

Pediatr Clin North Am 2018 12;65(6):xv-xvi

Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine at Seton Hall University, 340 Kingsland Street, Building 123, Nutley, NJ 07110, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.09.010DOI Listing
December 2018

Medical Marijuana Laws and Marijuana Use Among U.S. Adolescents: Evidence From Michigan Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Data.

J Drug Educ 2018 Mar-Jun;48(1-2):18-35. Epub 2018 Oct 9.

Division of Infectious Diseases and Department of Family Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0047237918803361DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6551305PMC
October 2018

Teeth: Vital to Our Children's Health.

Authors:
Bonita F Stanton

Pediatr Clin North Am 2018 10;65(5):xv-xvi

Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine at Seton Hall University, 340 South Orange Street, Building 123, Nutley, NJ 07110, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.07.002DOI Listing
October 2018

Quantum changes in self-efficacy and condom-use intention among youth: A chained cusp catastrophe model.

J Adolesc 2018 10 14;68:187-197. Epub 2018 Aug 14.

Department of Epidemiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA.

Introduction: The complex relationships among HIV knowledge, condom-use skills, self-efficacy, peer influence and intention to use condoms have been rigorously investigated. However, studies guided by a linear behavior change model often explain only a limited amount of variances. This study aims to advance our understanding of the relationships through a nonlinear quantum change paradigm.

Methods: Data (n = 1970, 40.61% male, mean age 16.94 ± 0.74) from a behavioral intervention program among high school students in the Bahamas were analyzed with a chained cusp catastrophe model in two steps. In the first step, self-efficacy was analyzed as the outcome with HIV knowledge/condom-use skills as asymmetry variables and peer influence as bifurcation variable. In the second step, condom-use intention was analyzed as the outcome while self-efficacy (outcome in the first step) was used as bifurcation variable allowing peer influence as bifurcation, and HIV knowledge/condom-use skills were included as asymmetry. Cusp modeling analysis was conducted along with equivalent linear models.

Results: The cusp model performed better than the linear and logistic models. Cusp modeling analyses revealed that peer influence significantly bifurcated the relationships between HIV knowledge/condom-use skills and self-efficacy; while both self-efficacy and peer influence significantly bifurcated the relationship between HIV knowledge/condom-use skills and condom-use intention.

Conclusion: Our findings support the central role of self-efficacy and peer influence as two chains in bridging the complex quantum relationships between HIV knowledge/condom-use skills and condom-use intention among adolescents. The nonlinear cusp catastrophe modeling provided a new method to advance HIV behavioral research.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.adolescence.2018.07.020DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6157611PMC
October 2018

Attitudes toward evidence-based practices, occupational stress and work-related social support among health care providers in China: A SEM analysis.

PLoS One 2018 10;13(8):e0202166. Epub 2018 Aug 10.

Hackensack-Meridian School of Medicine, Seton Hall University, South Orange, New Jersey, United States of America.

Individuals' attitudes toward evidence-based practices (EBP) are critical in adopting, implementing and maintaining the EBP in clinical settings. Multiple empirical studies have examined how work context may shape perceptions and attitudes towards EBP. The current study aims to further explore how both work and family contexts, as assessed by three psychosocial indicators (i.e., occupational stress, work-related social support from coworkers, and work-related social support from family), may affect attitudes toward EBP among health care providers in HIV clinics in China. We analyzed cross-sectional survey data from 357 health care providers recruited from 40 HIV clinics across 16 cities/counties in Guangxi China. Structural equation model (SEM) was constructed to test the hypothesized relationships among key study variables. Occupational stress was negatively associated with work-related social support from coworkers (β = -.19, 95%CI = [-.31,-.12]), which in turn was positively associated with attitudes toward EBP (β = .17, 95%CI = [.04, .30]). Similarly, occupational stress was negatively related to work-related social support from family (β = -.34, 95%CI = [-.42,-.25]), which in turn was positively related to attitudes toward EBP (β = .23, 95%CI = [.12, .35]). Occupational stress was negatively associated with attitudes toward EBP, but the magnitude of association did not reach statistical significance at α = .05. Work-related social support from family partially mediated the association between occupational stress and attitudes toward EBP (Sobel's z = 3.27, p < .05). Our findings suggest the importance of integrating work and family contexts, especially family support into the strategies of facilitating the adoption and implementation of EBP. The current study also underscores the needs to reduce occupational stress and enhance work-related social support among health care providers who are in frequent contact with HIV patients. In addition, lack of work-related family support may be a main barrier preventing health care providers from developing a positive attitude toward EBP. Therefore, the interventions aiming for promoting adoption and utilization of EBP need to involve specific strategies to resolve work-family conflicts and improve family members' understanding and support for health care providers in China, especially those who work in a stressful work context such as HIV care.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0202166PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6086451PMC
February 2019

Pediatric Rheumatology: A Field of Great Progress.

Authors:
Bonita F Stanton

Pediatr Clin North Am 2018 08;65(4):xiii-xiv

Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine, Seton Hall University, 400 South Orange Street, South Orange, NJ 07079, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.05.002DOI Listing
August 2018

Living up to Its Name: Advances in Benign Hematology.

Authors:
Bonita F Stanton

Pediatr Clin North Am 2018 06;65(3):xv-xvi

School of Medicine Seton Hall-Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine, Seton Hall University, 400 South Orange Street, South Orange, NJ 07079, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2018.03.002DOI Listing
June 2018