Publications by authors named "Bodil H Blix"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Narrative care: Unpacking pandemic paradoxes.

Nurs Inq 2021 Sep 19:e12462. Epub 2021 Sep 19.

Centre for Research for Teacher Education and Development, Faculty of Education, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

During the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, public health has issued three interrelated dominant narratives through social media and news outlets: First, to care for others, we must keep physically distant; second, we live in the same world and experience the same pandemic; and third, we will return to normal at some point. These narratives create complexities as they collide with the authors' everyday lives as nurses, educators, and women. This collision creates three paradoxes for us: (a) learning to care by creating physical distance, (b) a sense of togetherness erases inequities, and (c) returning to normal is possible. To inquire into these three paradoxes, we draw on our experiences with Ingrid, an older adult who requires in-home physical care, and Matthew, a man with multiple disabilities including severe oral dyspraxia and developmental delays. We outline how narrative care is a counterstory to the dominant narratives and enables us to find ways to live our lives within the paradoxes. Narrative care allows us, through attention to embodiment, liminality, and imagination, to create forward looking stories. Understanding narrative care within these paradoxes allows us to offer more complex understandings of the ways narrative care can be embodied in our, and others', lives.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nin.12462DOI Listing
September 2021

"Falling off the wagon": older adults' experiences of living with frailty in rural arctic communities.

Int J Circumpolar Health 2021 12;80(1):1957569

Department of Health and Care Sciences, UiT the Arctic University of Norway, Tromso, Norway.

Most populations around the world are ageing. The proportion of older adults in the population is larger and is growing more rapidly in rural communities than in urban areas. Longevity increases the risk of frailty. Our aim was to explore how single-living frail older adults experience living with frailty in everyday life in rural Arctic areas. Over eight months, we conducted a series of three interviews with eight older adults identified as frail by home care services in two rural municipalities in northern Norway. We conducted a thematic analysis. We generated three themes. indicated that the participants' experiences of frailty varied over time. referred to the findings that many participants tried to adapt to the changing circumstances, while others found it more challenging to accept the experienced limitations. concerned the findings that the rural Arctic environment affected the participants' experiences of frailty due to its long, snowy winters; long distances between communities and municipal centres; and out-migration. Our results demonstrate that frailty is a consequence of the interplay between ageing persons and their physical and social environments.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/22423982.2021.1957569DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8366667PMC
December 2021

The necessity and possibilities of playfulness in narrative care with older adults.

Nurs Inq 2021 01 13;28(1):e12373. Epub 2020 Jul 13.

Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada.

For us, narrative care is grounded in pragmatist philosophy and focused on experience. Narrative care is not merely about acknowledging or listening to people's experiences, but draws attention to practical consequences. We conceptualize care itself as an intrinsically narrative endeavour. In this article, we build on Lugones' understanding of playfulness, particularly to her call to remain attentive to a sense of uncertainty, and an openness to surprise. Playfulness cultivates a generative sense of curiosity that relies on a close attentiveness not only to the other, but to who we each are within relational spaces. Generative curiosity is only possible if we remain playful as we engage and think with experiences and if we remain responsive to the other. Through playfulness, we resist dominant narratives and hold open relational spaces that create opportunities of retelling and reliving our experiences. Drawing on our work alongside older adults, as well as people who work in long-term care, we show the possibilities of playfulness in the co-composition of stories across time. By intentionally integrating playfulness, narrative care can be seen as an intervention, as well as a human activity, across diverse social contexts, places and times.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nin.12373DOI Listing
January 2021

Clinicians' assumptions about Sami culture and experience providing mental health services to Indigenous patients in Norway.

Transcult Psychiatry 2020 04 6;57(2):363-374. Epub 2020 Feb 6.

UiT The Arctic University of Norway.

This qualitative study explores Sami and non-Sami clinicians' assumptions about Sami culture and their experiences in providing mental health services to Sami patients. The aim is to better understand and improve the ways in which culture is incorporated into mental health services in practice. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 clinicians in mental health outpatient clinics in the northern Sami area in Troms and Finnmark County in Norway. The findings show that clinicians' conceptualizations of culture influence how they take cultural considerations about their Sami patients into account. To better integrate culture into clinical practice, the cultures of both patient and clinician, as well as of mental health care itself, need to be assessed. Finally, the findings indicate a lack of professional team discussions about the role of Sami culture in clinical practice.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363461520903123DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7238502PMC
April 2020

Perceptions of Family Caregivers of Home-Dwelling Persons with Dementia regarding Access to Information and Involvement in Decisions.

J Aging Soc Policy 2020 May-Jun;32(3):260-275. Epub 2020 Jan 9.

Centre for Care Research North, Department of Health and Care Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.

This cross-sectional study explored factors affecting information about available health services, content of services provided, and involvement in decisions regarding services as perceived by the family caregivers of home-dwelling persons with dementia in Northern Norway. Altogether, 788 family caregivers were invited to participate in a survey, with a response rate of 54.6% (n = 430). The respondents reported modest levels of perceived information and involvement. Few of the expected predictors were associated with the outcomes. Ordinal logistic regression analyses revealed that primary school as the highest level of education and perception of caregiving as moderately or very demanding predicted lower scores on family caregivers' perceived level of information about available services, information on service content, and involvement in decisions. In addition, medium household income predicted lower scores on information about service content. The results may point to mechanisms that create inequalities in the processing of information and involvement in care decisions regarding care arrangements among different caregiver groups. Health authorities should investigate potential social inequalities in complementary health care for home-dwelling persons with dementia.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08959420.2019.1707058DOI Listing
December 2020

A Narrative Care approach for persons living with dementia in institutional care settings.

Int J Older People Nurs 2020 Mar 2;15(1):e12278. Epub 2019 Oct 2.

Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada.

Aims And Objectives: We will provide insights in the theoretical background and key concepts of a Narrative Care approach, such as narrative cultures, narrative curiosity, narrative co-composition and narrative reflective practice.

Background: Care understood as narrative practice underscores the importance of experiences and how these shape identities. Important to the quality of care in institutional care settings is the ability of care providers to cope with complexities and uncertainties in older adults' stories, which can be realised by attending to ways that foster and co-compose evolving and forward-looking narratives. Recognising these ongoing co-compositions means that persons living in institutional care settings and care providers live, tell, retell and relive their experiences. A change in the current institutional culture is necessary to implement care as narrative practice. To support such a change, approaches are needed that foster a focus on experiences and relationships and make relational ethics central to care.

Methods: The proposed Narrative Care approach is the result of an iterative development process involving a literature review, interviews with, and observations of, care providers, dialogues with an advisory committee, and consultation with experts.

Main Contributions: The proposed Narrative Care approach aims to help care providers (a) to recognise the importance of curiosity in a person's verbal and embodied narratives-especially for those living with dementia; (b) to take note of individual experiences in all of their complexity and uncertainty; (c) to respect these narratives; (d) to open up spaces to co-compose new narratives; and (e) to allow care providers to engage in narrative reflective practices that shape who they are and are becoming.

Conclusion: The introduced approach responds to the need of implementing strategies to think and work narratively in institutional care settings.

Implications For Practice: Narrative Care has the potential to reshape task-oriented, technical notions of care. Concepts such as embodied narratives, relational ethics, narrative co-composition and narrative reflective practice must be integrated in the education of all care providers.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/opn.12278DOI Listing
March 2020

Theoretical foundations of narrative care: Turning towards relational ethics.

Nurs Ethics 2019 Nov-Dec;26(7-8):1917-1927. Epub 2018 Nov 9.

University of Alberta, Canada.

In the past decades, narrative practices have been developed, and care has been conceptualized as being narrative in nature. More recently, narrative care has been developing both as a practice and a field of study. It is necessary to make the theoretical foundations of narrative care visible to avoid the risk of narrowly defining narrative care as a matter of storytelling and listening. In this article, we develop an understanding of narrative care grounded in early feminist pragmatist philosophy, with a focus on social and political activism and experience. Pragmatism holds the possibilities to open spaces for realities that are constantly in flux and for emergent situations that must be considered across time, diverse places and social contexts. With the aid of Vera's stories about her relationship with Tammy, we demonstrate the importance of recognizing that realities are multiple, complex and uncertain. Furthermore, we discuss how the stronghold of formula stories and issues of power, positioning and inequities, restrict people's possibilities to be, become and co-author their stories. We also argue that the playfulness, imagination and world travelling of narrative care are in line with early feminist pragmatism, which draws on a wide and diverse range of experiences. Jane Addams linked democracy to dialogue, joint experiences and social equality. This calls for the development of ethical frameworks grounded in care that are more specifically focused on relational ethics and a commitment to dialogical and relational democracy and the prioritization of community.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0969733018808079DOI Listing
March 2020

Factors affecting the use of home-based services and out-of-home respite care services: A survey of family caregivers for older persons with dementia in Northern Norway.

Dementia (London) 2020 Jul 15;19(5):1712-1731. Epub 2018 Oct 15.

Department of Health and Care Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Norway.

Background: Family caregivers contribute substantially to the care for older home-dwelling people with dementia, although community healthcare services tend to be underutilized. In this study, we aimed to explore the use and predictors of use of home-based and out-of-home respite care services available to older home-dwelling persons with dementia, as reported by the family caregivers.

Method: A cross-sectional survey was administered to family caregivers ( = 430) in Northern Norway during April to November 2016. The use of healthcare services was categorized into two types according to principal component analysis: home-based services and out-of-home respite care services ( = 44.1%). Predictors of service use were examined with bivariate correlation, multiple linear regression, and Poisson regression analyses.

Results: The use of home-based services among persons with dementia was significantly higher for persons with advanced age, persons living in urban areas, persons living in an assisted living facility, persons living alone, and persons able to manage being alone for a short period of time. Among the family caregiver variables, higher age, status as a daughter, son, or other family member, higher educational level, and full-time employment also predicted greater use of home-based services. Same ethnicity was associated with use of fewer home-based services. The use of out-of-home respite care services was significantly higher among male persons with dementia and among those living in urban areas. In addition, fewer out-of-home respite care services were used by male caregivers or daughters of the care recipient, while the use was higher when the caregivers experienced more caregiving demands or had provided care for longer periods of time.

Conclusions: These results indicate areas that policymakers and healthcare providers should consider to identify families who underutilize healthcare services and to achieve a more equal and efficient allocation of services in accordance with families' needs.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1471301218804981DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7309361PMC
July 2020
-->