Publications by authors named "Bo-Gyeong Seo"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Endothelial Cells Differentiated from Porcine Epiblast Stem Cells.

Cell Reprogram 2021 Apr;23(2):89-98

Division of Life Science, College of Natural Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, Republic of Korea.

Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have the ability of self-renewal that can retain the characteristics of the mother cell, and of pluripotency that can differentiate into several body types. PSCs typically include embryonic stem cells (ESCs) derived from the inner cell mass of the preimplantation embryo, and epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs) derived from the epiblast of postimplantation embryo. Although PSCs are able to be used by differentiation into endothelial cells as a potential treatment for vascular diseases, human ESCs and induced PSCs (iPSCs) are followed by ethical and safety issues. Pigs are anatomically and physiologically similar to humans. Therefore, the goal of this study was to establish an efficient protocol that differentiates porcine EpiSCs (pEpiSCs) into the endothelial cells for applying the treatment of human vascular diseases. As a result, alkaline phosphatase (AP)-negative (-) pEpiSCs cultured in endothelial cell growth basal medium-2 (EBM-2) differentiation medium in association with 50 ng/mL of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) for 8 days were changed morphologically like the feature of endothelial cells, and expression of pluripotency-associated markers (OCT-3/4, NANOG, SOX2, and C-MYC) in porcine differentiated cells was significantly decreased ( < 0.05). Additionally, when pEpiSCs were cultured in EBM-2 + 50 ng/mL of VEGF, porcine differentiated cells represented a common endothelial cell marker positive (CD31+) but monocytes and lymphocytes marker negative (CD45-). Therefore, these results indicated that pEpiSCs cultured in EBM-2 + 50 ng/mL of VEGF culture condition were efficiently differentiated into endothelial cells for the treatment of blood vessel diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cell.2020.0088DOI Listing
April 2021

C5, A Cassaine Diterpenoid Amine, Induces Apoptosis via the Extrinsic Pathways in Human Lung Cancer Cells and Human Lymphoma Cells.

Int J Mol Sci 2020 Feb 14;21(4). Epub 2020 Feb 14.

Division of Life Science, College of Natural Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 52828, Korea.

Apoptosis pathways in cells are classified into two pathways: the extrinsic pathway, mediated by binding of the ligand to a death receptor and the intrinsic pathway, mediated by mitochondria. Apoptosis is regulated by various proteins such as Bcl-2 (B-cell lymphoma 2) family and cellular FLICE (Fas-associated Death Domain Protein Interleukin-1β-converting enzyme)-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP), which have been reported to inhibit caspase-8 activity. In this study, it was found that C5 (3β-Acetyl-nor-erythrophlamide), a compound of cassaine diterpene amine from Erythrophleum fordii, induced cell apoptosis in a variety of types of cancer cells. Induction of apoptosis in cancer cells by C5 was inversely related to the level of Bcl-2 expression. Overexpression of Bcl-2 into cancer cells significantly decreased C5-induced apoptosis. It was also found that treatment of cancer cells with a caspase-8 inhibitor significantly suppressed C5-induced apoptosis; however, treatment with caspase-9 inhibitors did not affect C5-induced apoptosis, suggesting that C5 may induce apoptosis via the extrinsic pathway by activating caspase-8. It was confirmed that treatment with C5 alone induced an association of FADD with procaspase-8; however, overexpression of c-FLIP decreased C5-induced caspase-8 activation. In conclusion, C5 could be utilized as a new useful lead compound for the development of an anti-cancer agent that has the goal of apoptosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms21041298DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7072863PMC
February 2020