Publications by authors named "Bleuenn Gueguen"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A new chemical separation procedure for the determination of rare earth elements and yttrium abundances in carbonates by ICP-MS.

Talanta 2020 Nov 13;219:121244. Epub 2020 Jun 13.

LaTIM (INSERM UMR 1101) Université de Bretagne Occidentale, 22, Avenue C. Desmoulins, 29238, Brest Cedex 3, France.

The determination of rare earth elements (REEs) and Y in carbonates can be complicated by low REE abundances and the presence of significant amounts of Ba resulting in problematic interferences when analysed by ICP-MS. We describe here a novel ion-exchange method using the DGA resin (TODGA), combined with addition of a Tm spike, which allows the separation of the REEs+Y as a whole prior to analysis using an Element XR ICP-MS. This method was validated with results obtained on three different reference carbonate materials (CAL-S, JLs-1 and BEAN, an in-house standard), yielding reproducibility levels better than 3% (RSD) in most cases. This new separation scheme is particularly well suited for carbonate samples having very low REE contents, but could be equally applied to various rock types and organic-rich sample matrices whenever quantitative Ba removal is required.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.talanta.2020.121244DOI Listing
November 2020

A paleosol record of the evolution of Cr redox cycling and evidence for an increase in atmospheric oxygen during the Neoproterozoic.

Geobiology 2019 11 22;17(6):579-593. Epub 2019 Aug 22.

Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA.

Atmospheric oxygen levels control the oxidative side of key biogeochemical cycles and place limits on the development of high-energy metabolisms. Understanding Earth's oxygenation is thus critical to developing a clearer picture of Earth's long-term evolution. However, there is currently vigorous debate about even basic aspects of the timing and pattern of the rise of oxygen. Chemical weathering in the terrestrial environment occurs in contact with the atmosphere, making paleosols potentially ideal archives to track the history of atmospheric O levels. Here we present stable chromium isotope data from multiple paleosols that offer snapshots of Earth surface conditions over the last three billion years. The results indicate a secular shift in the oxidative capacity of Earth's surface in the Neoproterozoic and suggest low atmospheric oxygen levels (<1% PAL pO ) through the majority of Earth's history. The paleosol record also shows that localized Cr oxidation may have begun as early as the Archean, but efficient, modern-like transport of hexavalent Cr under an O -rich atmosphere did not become common until the Neoproterozoic.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/gbi.12360DOI Listing
November 2019

Compound-specific recording of gadolinium pollution in coastal waters by great scallops.

Sci Rep 2019 05 29;9(1):8015. Epub 2019 May 29.

LaTIM (INSERM UMR 1101) Université de Bretagne Occidentale. 22, avenue C. Desmoulins, 29238, Brest Cedex 3, France.

Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs), routinely used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), end up directly in coastal seawaters where gadolinium concentrations are now increasing. Because many aquatic species could be sensitive to this new pollution, we have evaluated the possibility of using shellfish to assess its importance. Gadolinium excesses recorded by scallop shells collected in Bay of Brest (Brittany, France) for more than 30 years do not reflect the overall consumption in GBCAs, but are largely controlled by one of them, the gadopentetate dimeglumine. Although its use has been greatly reduced in Europe over the last ten years, gadolinium excesses are still measured in shells. Thus, some gadolinium derived from other GBCAs is bioavailable and could have an impact on marine wildlife.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-44539-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6541655PMC
May 2019

Volatile element evolution of chondrules through time.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2018 08 6;115(34):8547-8552. Epub 2018 Aug 6.

Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, CNRS UMR 7154, 75238 Paris Cedex 05, France.

Chondrites and their main components, chondrules, are our guides into the evolution of the Solar System. Investigating the history of chondrules, including their volatile element history and the prevailing conditions of their formation, has implications not only for the understanding of chondrule formation and evolution but for that of larger bodies such as the terrestrial planets. Here we have determined the bulk chemical composition-rare earth, refractory, main group, and volatile element contents-of a suite of chondrules previously dated using the Pb-Pb system. The volatile element contents of chondrules increase with time from ∼1 My after Solar System formation, likely the result of mixing with a volatile-enriched component during chondrule recycling. Variations in the Mn/Na ratios signify changes in redox conditions over time, suggestive of decoupled oxygen and volatile element fugacities, and indicating a decrease in oxygen fugacity and a relative increase in the fugacities of in-fluxing volatiles with time. Within the context of terrestrial planet formation via pebble accretion, these observations corroborate the early formation of Mars under relatively oxidizing conditions and the protracted growth of Earth under more reducing conditions, and further suggest that water and volatile elements in the inner Solar System may not have arrived pairwise.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1807263115DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6112700PMC
August 2018

Evidence for extremely rapid magma ocean crystallization and crust formation on Mars.

Nature 2018 06 27;558(7711):586-589. Epub 2018 Jun 27.

Centre for Star and Planet Formation and Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.

The formation of a primordial crust is a critical step in the evolution of terrestrial planets but the timing of this process is poorly understood. The mineral zircon is a powerful tool for constraining crust formation because it can be accurately dated with the uranium-to-lead (U-Pb) isotopic decay system and is resistant to subsequent alteration. Moreover, given the high concentration of hafnium in zircon, the lutetium-to-hafnium (Lu-Hf) isotopic decay system can be used to determine the nature and formation timescale of its source reservoir. Ancient igneous zircons with crystallization ages of around 4,430 million years (Myr) have been reported in Martian meteorites that are believed to represent regolith breccias from the southern highlands of Mars. These zircons are present in evolved lithologies interpreted to reflect re-melted primary Martian crust , thereby potentially providing insight into early crustal evolution on Mars. Here, we report concomitant high-precision U-Pb ages and Hf-isotope compositions of ancient zircons from the NWA 7034 Martian regolith breccia. Seven zircons with mostly concordant U-Pb ages define Pb/Pb dates ranging from 4,476.3 ± 0.9 Myr ago to 4,429.7 ± 1.0 Myr ago, including the oldest directly dated material from Mars. All zircons record unradiogenic initial Hf-isotope compositions inherited from an enriched, andesitic-like crust extracted from a primitive mantle no later than 4,547 Myr ago. Thus, a primordial crust existed on Mars by this time and survived for around 100 Myr before it was reworked, possibly by impacts, to produce magmas from which the zircons crystallized. Given that formation of a stable primordial crust is the end product of planetary differentiation, our data require that the accretion, core formation and magma ocean crystallization on Mars were completed less than 20 Myr after the formation of the Solar System. These timescales support models that suggest extremely rapid magma ocean crystallization leading to a gravitationally unstable stratified mantle, which subsequently overturns, resulting in decompression melting of rising cumulates and production of a primordial basaltic to andesitic crust.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41586-018-0222-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6107064PMC
June 2018

Tracking the rise of eukaryotes to ecological dominance with zinc isotopes.

Geobiology 2018 07 5;16(4):341-352. Epub 2018 Jun 5.

Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut.

The biogeochemical cycling of zinc (Zn) is intimately coupled with organic carbon in the ocean. Based on an extensive new sedimentary Zn isotope record across Earth's history, we provide evidence for a fundamental shift in the marine Zn cycle ~800 million years ago. We discuss a wide range of potential drivers for this transition and propose that, within available constraints, a restructuring of marine ecosystems is the most parsimonious explanation for this shift. Using a global isotope mass balance approach, we show that a change in the organic Zn/C ratio is required to account for observed Zn isotope trends through time. Given the higher affinity of eukaryotes for Zn relative to prokaryotes, we suggest that a shift toward a more eukaryote-rich ecosystem could have provided a means of more efficiently sequestering organic-derived Zn. Despite the much earlier appearance of eukaryotes in the microfossil record (~1700 to 1600 million years ago), our data suggest a delayed rise to ecological prominence during the Neoproterozoic, consistent with the currently accepted organic biomarker records.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/gbi.12289DOI Listing
July 2018