Publications by authors named "Binyou Liao"

7 Publications

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Corrigendum: Reactive Oxygen Species in Pathogen Clearance: The Killing Mechanisms, the Adaption Response, and the Side Effects.

Front Microbiol 2021 13;12:685133. Epub 2021 May 13.

State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.

[This corrects the article DOI: 10.3389/fmicb.2020.622534.].
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2021.685133DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8152934PMC
May 2021

The cross-kingdom interaction between Helicobacter pylori and Candida albicans.

PLoS Pathog 2021 May 6;17(5):e1009515. Epub 2021 May 6.

State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases & National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases & West China School of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1009515DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8101746PMC
May 2021

Candida albicans CHK1 gene from two-component system is essential for its pathogenicity in oral candidiasis.

Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 2021 Mar 26;105(6):2485-2496. Epub 2021 Feb 26.

State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases & National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610041, Sichuan, China.

The roles of Candida albicans CHK1, a key gene from two-component system, in oral mucosal infection are not clear. This study evaluated the key roles of CHK1 gene in vitro and in vivo. The expression of CHK1 and its regulated virulence factors were tested during the oral epithelial cell infection. The production of lactate dehydrogenase, ROS, and IL-1α combined with the confocal and scanning electron microscope observation was employed to identify the capability of CHK1 in damaging the epithelial cells. Both immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice oropharyngeal infection models were involved to confirm the roles of CHK1 gene in vivo. The expression of CHK1 gene was significantly increased during the oral epithelial cell infection. The chk1Δ/Δ mutant failed to damage the epithelial cells or induce IL-α and ROS production. Interestingly, chk1Δ/Δ can also form the similar hyphae with WT and complementary strains. Accordingly, chk1Δ/Δ did not affect the adhesion and invasion rates of C. albicans to oral epithelial cells. However, chk1Δ/Δ significantly decreased the expression levels of the virulence factors, including ALS2, SAP6, and YWP1. The chk1Δ/Δ also failed to cause oral candidiasis in both immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice indicating that CHK1 gene from the two-component system is essential for the pathogenicity of C. albicans. KEY POINTS: • CHK1gene is essential for C. albicans in oral candidiasis • C. albicans without CHK1 gene can form "non-pathogenic" hyphae. • CHK1 gene regulates the virulence of C. albicans.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-021-11187-0DOI Listing
March 2021

Reactive Oxygen Species in Pathogen Clearance: The Killing Mechanisms, the Adaption Response, and the Side Effects.

Front Microbiol 2020 4;11:622534. Epub 2021 Feb 4.

State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are attractive weapons in both antibiotic-mediated killing and host-mediated killing. However, the involvement of ROS in antibiotic-mediated killing and complexities in host environments challenge the paradigm. In the case of bacterial pathogens, the examples of some certain pathogens thriving under ROS conditions prompt us to focus on the adaption mechanism that pathogens evolve to cope with ROS. Based on these, we here summarized the mechanisms of ROS-mediated killing of either antibiotics or the host, the examples of bacterial adaption that successful pathogens evolved to defend or thrive under ROS conditions, and the potential side effects of ROS in pathogen clearance. A brief section for new antibacterial strategies centered around ROS was also addressed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2020.622534DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7889972PMC
February 2021

Advances of Anti-Caries Nanomaterials.

Molecules 2020 Oct 30;25(21). Epub 2020 Oct 30.

State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases & National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China.

Caries is the most common and extensive oral chronic disease. Due to the lack of anti-caries properties, traditional caries filling materials can easily cause secondary caries and lead to treatment failure. Nanomaterials can interfere with the bacteria metabolism, inhibit the formation of biofilm, reduce demineralization, and promote remineralization, which is expected to be an effective strategy for caries management. The nanotechnology in anti-caries materials, especially nano-adhesive and nano-composite resin, has developed fast in recent years. In this review, the antibacterial nanomaterials, remineralization nanomaterials, and nano-drug delivery systems are reviewed. We are aimed to provide a theoretical basis for the future development of anti-caries nanomaterials.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules25215047DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7662703PMC
October 2020

The microbial coinfection in COVID-19.

Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 2020 Sep 11;104(18):7777-7785. Epub 2020 Aug 11.

State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases & National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, NO. 14, 3rd Section of Ren Min Nan Rd. Chengdu, Sichuan, 610041, China.

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), a novel β-coronavirus, is the main pathogenic agent of the rapidly spreading pneumonia called coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). SARS-CoV-2 infects much more people, especially the elder population, around the world than other coronavirus, such as SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV, which is challenging current global public health system. Beyond the pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2, microbial coinfection plays an important role in the occurrence and development of SARS-CoV-2 infection by raising the difficulties of diagnosis, treatment, prognosis of COVID-19, and even increasing the disease symptom and mortality. We summarize the coinfection of virus, bacteria and fungi with SARS-CoV-2, their effects on COVID-19, the reasons of coinfection, and the diagnosis to emphasize the importance of microbial coinfection in COVID-19. KEY POINTS: • Microbial coinfection is a nonnegligible factor in COVID-19. • Microbial coinfection exacerbates the processes of the occurrence, development and prognosis of COVID-19, and the difficulties of clinical diagnosis and treatment. • Different virus, bacteria, and fungi contributed to the coinfection with SARS-CoV-2.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-020-10814-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7417782PMC
September 2020

Dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate inhibits Candida albicans and oropharyngeal candidiasis in a pH-dependent manner.

Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 2020 Apr 3;104(8):3585-3595. Epub 2020 Mar 3.

State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases & National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.

The prevalence of stomatitis, especially that caused by Candida albicans, has highlighted the need for new antifungal agents. We previously found that a type of quaternary ammonium salts, dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMADDM), incorporated in dental materials inhibited the growth and hyphal development of C. albicans. However, how the quaternary ammonium salts inhibited the fungal pathogens and whether the oral condition, such as salivary pH variation under different diseases, can affect the antimicrobial capacity of quaternary ammonium salts is unknown. This study evaluated the antifungal effects of DMADDM at different pH in vitro and in vivo. A pH-dependent antifungal effect of DMADDM was observed in planktonic and biofilm growth. DMADDM enhanced antifungal activity at alkaline pH. Two pH-regulated genes (PHR1/PHR2) of C. albicans were correlated with the pH-dependent antifungal effects of DMADDM. The PHR1/PHR2 genes and pH values regulated the zeta potential of C. albicans, which then influenced the binding between C. albicans cells and DMADDM. The pH-dependent antifungal activity of DMADDM was then substantiated in a murine oropharyngeal candidiasis model. We directly demonstrated that the antifungal abilities of quaternary ammonium salts relied on the cell zeta potential which affected the binding between fungal cells and quaternary ammonium salts. These findings suggest a new antifungal mechanism of quaternary ammonium under different pH and that DMADDM can be a potential antifungal agent applied in dental materials and stomatitis therapy.Key Points • DMADDM has stronger antifungal activity in alkaline than in acidic pH conditions. • The pH values and pH-regulated genes can affect the zeta potential of fungal cells. • Zeta potential of fungal cells directly affect the binding between DMADDM and cells. Graphical abstract Schematic diagram of the antifungal activities of DMADDM at different pH values.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-020-10496-0DOI Listing
April 2020