Publications by authors named "Binu Mani Tripathi"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Contrasting early successional dynamics of bacterial and fungal communities in recently deglaciated soils of the maritime Antarctic.

Mol Ecol 2021 09 16;30(17):4231-4244. Epub 2021 Jul 16.

Korea Polar Research Institute (KOPRI), Incheon, Korea.

Although microorganisms are the very first colonizers of recently deglaciated soils even prior to plant colonization, the drivers and patterns of microbial community succession at early-successional stages remain poorly understood. The successional dynamics and assembly processes of bacterial and fungal communities were compared on a glacier foreland in the maritime Antarctic across the ~10-year soil-age gradient from bare soil to sparsely vegetated area. Bacterial communities shifted more rapidly than fungal communities in response to glacial retreat; species turnover (primarily the transition from glacier- to soil-favouring taxa) contributed greatly to bacterial beta diversity, but this pattern was less clear in fungi. Bacterial communities underwent more predictable (more deterministic) changes along the soil-age gradient, with compositional changes paralleling the direction of changes in soil physicochemical properties following deglaciation. In contrast, the compositional shift in fungal communities was less associated with changes in deglaciation-induced changes in soil geochemistry and most fungal taxa displayed mosaic abundance distribution across the landscape, suggesting that the successional dynamics of fungal communities are largely governed by stochastic processes. A co-occurrence network analysis revealed that biotic interactions between bacteria and fungi are very weak in early succession. Taken together, these results collectively suggest that bacterial and fungal communities in recently deglaciated soils are largely decoupled from each other during succession and exert very divergent trajectories of succession and assembly under different selective forces.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.16054DOI Listing
September 2021

Faecal microbiota changes associated with the moult fast in chinstrap and gentoo penguins.

PLoS One 2019 8;14(5):e0216565. Epub 2019 May 8.

Division of Polar Life Sciences, Korea Polar Research Institute, Incheon, Republic of Korea.

In many seabirds, individuals abstain from eating during the moult period. Penguins have an intense moult that lasts for weeks, during which they are confined to land. Despite the importance for survival, it is still unclear how the faecal microbiota of Antarctic penguins changes in response to the moult fast. Here, we investigated the faecal microbiota of chinstrap (Pygoscelis antarcticus) and gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua) on King George Island, Antarctica. The bacterial community compositions during the feeding and moulting stages were compared for both species using bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicon on an Illumina MiSeq platform. Our results showed that the moult fast altered the bacterial community structures in both penguin species. Interestingly, the bacterial community composition shifted in the same direction in response to the moult fast but formed two distinct clusters that were specific to each penguin species. A significant increase in bacterial diversity was observed in gentoo penguins, whereas no such change was observed for chinstrap penguins. By analysing the contribution of the ecological processes that determine bacterial community assembly, we observed that processes regulating community turnover were considerably different between the feeding and moulting stages for each penguin. At the phylum level, the relative abundances of Fusobacteria, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria were dominant in chinstrap penguins, and no significant changes were detected in these phyla between the feeding and moulting periods. Our results suggest that moult fast-induced changes in the faecal microbiota occur in both species.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0216565PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6505947PMC
January 2020

Variations in bacterial and archaeal communities along depth profiles of Alaskan soil cores.

Sci Rep 2018 01 11;8(1):504. Epub 2018 Jan 11.

Korea Polar Research Institute, Incheon, 21990, Republic of Korea.

Understating the microbial communities and ecological processes that influence their structure in permafrost soils is crucial for predicting the consequences of climate change. In this study we investigated the bacterial and archaeal communities along depth profiles of four soil cores collected across Alaska. The bacterial and archaeal diversity (amplicon sequencing) overall decreased along the soil depth but the depth-wise pattern of their abundances (qPCR) varied by sites. The community structure of bacteria and archaea displayed site-specific pattern, with a greater role of soil geochemical characteristics rather than soil depth. In particular, we found significant positive correlations between methane trapped in cores and relative abundance of methanogenic archaeal genera, indicating a strong association between microbial activity and methane production in subsurface soils. We observed that bacterial phylogenetic community assembly tended to be more clustered in surface soils than in deeper soils. Analyses of phylogenetic community turnover among depth profiles across cores indicated that the relative influence of deterministic and stochastic processes was mainly determined by soil properties rather than depth. Overall, our findings emphasize that the vertical distributions of bacterial and archaeal communities in permafrost soils are to a large extent determined by the variation in site-specific soil properties.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-18777-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5765012PMC
January 2018

Generalized soil Thaumarchaeota community in weathering rock and saprolite.

Microb Ecol 2015 Feb 5;69(2):356-60. Epub 2014 Nov 5.

College of Natural Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742, South Korea.

Relatively little is known of the archaeal communities associated with endolithic environments, compared to other microbial groups such as bacteria and fungi. Analyzing the pyrosequenced archaeal 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene V1-V3 region, we investigated the archaeal community associated with aboveground-exfoliated weathering layers of a granite gneiss, and of the saprolite derived from this rock at 1 m depth below the soil surface, in a forested hilly area south of Seoul, South Korea. In both these sites, an archaeal community dominated by the phylum Thaumarchaeota was identified. The archaeal community in all cases closely resembled that of the surface layer of acidic soils in temperate climates of Korea. It appears that there is no clear distinction in archaeal community composition between a soil and a rock and a saprolite despite a tremendous difference in the concentration of total nitrogen and organic carbon. Of the chemical properties we measured, pH was the best predictor of the archaeal community composition and relative abundance of thaumarchaeal subphyla. These findings reinforce the view that soil archaea are mostly generalists, whose ecology is not closely dependent on nitrogen concentration or soil organic matter status, the presence of living roots, or the abundant presence of any other biota.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00248-014-0526-yDOI Listing
February 2015

Influence of long term irrigation with pulp and paper mill effluent on the bacterial community structure and catabolic function in soil.

Indian J Microbiol 2014 Mar 2;54(1):65-73. Epub 2013 Apr 2.

Division of Microbiology, Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi, India.

Microbial communities play a vital role in maintaining soil health. A multiphasic approach to assess the effect of pulp and paper mill effluent on both the structure and function of microbial soil communities is taken. Bacterial communities from agricultural soils irrigated with pulp and paper mill effluent were compared to communities form soils irrigated with well water. Samples were taken from fields in the state of Uttarakhand, India, where pulp and paper mill effluent has been used for irrigation for over 25 years. Comparisons of bacterial community structure were conducted using sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene from both isolates and clone libraries attained from the soil. Community-level physiological profiling was used to characterize the functional diversity and catabolic profile of the bacterial communities. The multiphasic approach using both physiological and molecular techniques proved to be a powerful tool in evaluating the soil bacterial community population and population differences therein. A significant and consistent difference in the population structure and function was found for the bacterial communities from soil irrigated with effluent in comparison to fields irrigated with well water. The diversity index parameters indicated that the microbial community in pulp and paper mill effluent irrigated fields were more diverse in both structure and function. This suggests that the pulp and paper mill effluent is not having a negative effect on the soil microbial community, but in fact may have a positive influence. In terms of soil health, this finding supports the continued use of pulp and paper mill effluent for irrigation. This is however only one aspect of soil health which was evaluated. Further studies on soil resistance and robustness could be undertaken to holistically evaluate soil health in this situation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12088-013-0398-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3889853PMC
March 2014
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