Publications by authors named "Binshad Badarudeen"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Ubiquitin signaling in the control of centriole duplication.

FEBS J 2021 Jun 11. Epub 2021 Jun 11.

School of Biology, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Thiruvananthapuram, Vithura, India.

The centrosome plays an essential role in maintaining genetic stability, ciliogenesis and cell polarisation. The core of the centrosome is made up of two centrioles that duplicate precisely once during every cell cycle to generate two centrosomes that are required for bipolar spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. Abundance of centriole proteins at optimal levels and their recruitment to the centrosome are tightly regulated in time and space in order to restrict aberrant duplication of centrioles, a phenomenon that is observed in many cancers. Recent advances have conclusively shown that dedicated ubiquitin ligase-dependent protein degradation machineries are involved in governing centriole duplication. These studies revealed intricate mechanistic insights into how the ubiquitin ligases target different centriole proteins. In certain cases, a specific ubiquitin ligase targets a number of substrate proteins that co-regulate centriole assembly, prompting the possibility that substrate-targeting occurs during formation of the sub-centriolar structures. There are also instances where a specific centriole duplication protein is targeted by several ubiquitin ligases at different stages of the cell cycle, suggesting synchronised actions. Recent evidence also indicated a direct association of E3 ubiquitin ligase with the centrioles, supporting the notion that substrate-targeting occurs in the organelle itself. In this review, we highlight these advances by underlining the mechanisms of how different ubiquitin ligase machineries control centriole duplication and discuss our views on their coordination.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/febs.16069DOI Listing
June 2021

The ubiquitin ligase FBXW7 targets the centriolar assembly protein HsSAS-6 for degradation and thereby regulates centriole duplication.

J Biol Chem 2020 04 21;295(14):4428-4437. Epub 2020 Feb 21.

School of Biology, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Thiruvananthapuram, Vithura, Thiruvananthapuram 695551, Kerala, India

Formation of a single new centriole from a pre-existing centriole is strictly controlled to maintain correct centrosome number and spindle polarity in cells. However, the mechanisms that govern this process are incompletely understood. Here, using several human cell lines, immunofluorescence and structured illumination microscopy methods, and ubiquitination assays, we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase F-box and WD repeat domain-containing 7 (FBXW7), a subunit of the SCF ubiquitin ligase, down-regulates spindle assembly 6 homolog (HsSAS-6), a key protein required for procentriole cartwheel assembly, and thereby regulates centriole duplication. We found that FBXW7 abrogation stabilizes HsSAS-6 and increases its recruitment to the mother centriole at multiple sites, leading to supernumerary centrioles. Ultrastructural analyses revealed that FBXW7 is broadly localized on the mother centriole and that its presence is reduced at the site where the HsSAS-6-containing procentriole is formed. This observation suggested that FBXW7 restricts procentriole assembly to a specific site to generate a single new centriole. In contrast, during HsSAS-6 overexpression, FBXW7 strongly associated with HsSAS-6 at the centriole. We also found that SCF interacts with HsSAS-6 and targets it for ubiquitin-mediated degradation. Further, we identified putative phosphodegron sites in HsSAS-6, whose substitutions rendered it insensitive to FBXW7-mediated degradation and control of centriole number. In summary, SCF targets HsSAS-6 for degradation and thereby controls centriole biogenesis by restraining HsSAS-6 recruitment to the mother centriole, a molecular mechanism that controls supernumerary centrioles/centrosomes and the maintenance of bipolar spindles.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.AC119.012178DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7135989PMC
April 2020

EB1 regulates attachment of Ska1 with microtubules by forming extended structures on the microtubule lattice.

Nat Commun 2016 05 26;7:11665. Epub 2016 May 26.

School of Biology, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Thiruvananthapuram, CET Campus, Thiruvananthapuram 695016, India.

Kinetochore couples chromosome movement to dynamic microtubules, a process that is fundamental to mitosis in all eukaryotes but poorly understood. In vertebrates, spindle-kinetochore-associated (Ska1-3) protein complex plays an important role in this process. However, the proteins that stabilize Ska-mediated kinetochore-microtubule attachment remain unknown. Here we show that microtubule plus-end tracking protein EB1 facilitates Ska localization on microtubules in vertebrate cells. EB1 depletion results in a significant reduction of Ska1 recruitment onto microtubules and defects in mitotic chromosome alignment, which is also reflected in computational modelling. Biochemical experiments reveal that EB1 interacts with Ska1, facilitates Ska1-microtubule attachment and together stabilizes microtubules. Structural studies reveal that EB1 either with Ska1 or Ska complex forms extended structures on microtubule lattice. Results indicate that EB1 promotes Ska association with K-fibres and facilitates kinetochore-microtubule attachment. They also implicate that in vertebrates, chromosome coupling to dynamic microtubules could be mediated through EB1-Ska extended structures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms11665DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4894954PMC
May 2016

Human SAS-6 C-Terminus Nucleates and Promotes Microtubule Assembly in Vitro by Binding to Microtubules.

Biochemistry 2015 Oct 7;54(41):6413-22. Epub 2015 Oct 7.

School of Biology, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Thiruvananthapuram , CET Campus, Thiruvananthapuram 695016, Kerala, India.

Centrioles are essential components of the animal centrosome and play crucial roles in the formation of cilia and flagella. They are cylindrical structures composed of nine triplet microtubules organized around a central cartwheel. Recent studies have identified spindle assembly abnormal protein SAS-6 as a critical component necessary for formation of the cartwheel. However, the molecular details of how the cartwheel participates in centriolar microtubule assembly have not been clearly understood. In this report, we show that the C-terminal tail (residues 470-657) of human SAS-6, HsSAS-6 C, the region that has been shown to extend toward the centriolar wall where the microtubule triplets are organized, nucleated and induced microtubule polymerization in vitro. The N-terminus (residues 1-166) of HsSAS-6, the domain known to be involved in formation of the central hub of the cartwheel, did not, however, exert any effect on microtubule polymerization. HsSAS-6 C bound to the microtubules and localized along the lengths of the microtubules in vitro. Microtubule pull-down and coimmunoprecipitation (Co-IP) experiments with S-phase synchronized HeLa cell lysates showed that the endogenous HsSAS-6 coprecipitated with the microtubules, and it mediated interaction with tubulin. Isothermal calorimetry titration and size exclusion chromatography showed that HsSAS-6 C bound to the αβ-tubulin dimer in vitro. The results demonstrate that HsSAS-6 possesses an intrinsic microtubule assembly promoting activity and further implicate that its outer exposed C-terminal tail may play critical roles in microtubule assembly and stabilizing microtubule attachment with the centriolar cartwheel.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.biochem.5b00978DOI Listing
October 2015