Mr. Biniyam Sahiledengle, MPH, MA - Madda Walabu University Goba Referral Hospital - Lecturer and Environmental Health Expert

Mr. Biniyam Sahiledengle

MPH, MA

Madda Walabu University Goba Referral Hospital

Lecturer and Environmental Health Expert

Goba | Ethiopia

Main Specialties: Public Health

Additional Specialties: Environmental Health & Public Health Specialist

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-1114-4849

Mr. Biniyam Sahiledengle, MPH, MA - Madda Walabu University Goba Referral Hospital - Lecturer and Environmental Health Expert

Mr. Biniyam Sahiledengle

MPH, MA

Introduction

Biniyam Sahiledengle is working at Madda Walabu University, Department of Public Health as Lecturer and Environmental Health Expert. Currently, I am serving as a plan and program coordinator. Research area; Healthcare Acquired Infection; Infection Prevention and Patient Safety; Occupational Health; and Healthcare Waste Management.

Primary Affiliation: Madda Walabu University Goba Referral Hospital - Goba , Ethiopia

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:

Education

Jan 2014 - Jan 2016
Jimma University College of Public Health and Medical Sciences
MPH
Jan 2012 - Jan 2014
Grace Collage (Affiliate of Vision International University)
MA
Jan 2005 - Jan 2007
Haromaya University
Bsc.
Environmental Health Science

Experience

Oct 2010
Madda Walabu University
Lecturer and Chief Environmental Health Expert
Public Health

Publications

12Publications

40Reads

7Profile Views

Decontamination of patient equipment: nurses' self-reported decontamination practice in hospitals of southeast Ethiopia.

BMC Res Notes 2019 Jul 12;12(1):392. Epub 2019 Jul 12.

Department of Public Health, Madda Walabu University Goba Referral Hospital, Bale-Goba, Ethiopia.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13104-019-4427-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6624938PMC
July 2019
5 Reads

Prevalence and associated factors of safe and improved infant and young children stool disposal in Ethiopia: evidence from demographic and health survey.

BMC Public Health 2019 Jul 22;19(1):970. Epub 2019 Jul 22.

Department of Public Health, Madda Walabu University Goba Referral Hospital, Bale-Goba, Ethiopia.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12889-019-7325-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6647302PMC
July 2019
2.264 Impact Factor

Stethoscope disinfection is rarely done in Ethiopia: What are the associated factors?

PLoS One 2019 27;14(6):e0208365. Epub 2019 Jun 27.

Department of Public Health, Madda Walabu University Goba Referral Hospital, Bale-Goba, Ethiopia.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0208365PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6597050PMC
June 2019
1 Read
3.234 Impact Factor

Determinants of occupational exposure to blood and body fluids, healthcare workers’ risk perceptions and standard precautionary practices: a hospital-based study in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Ethiop. J. Health Dev. Feb 2019;33(1):4-11

Ethiopian Journal of Health Development

Background: The risk of occupational exposure to blood-borne infections is on the rise in hospital settings. The situation is worse in developing countries for a variety of reasons, such as poor working condition, excessive injection use, and poor adherence towards universal precautions. This study was undertaken to assess the determining factors of occupational exposures to blood-borne infections, as well as to describe healthcare workers’ risk perceptions and standard precautionary practices in selected hospitals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted from December 2016 to January 2017. A total of 323 healthcare workers from four public hospitals were selected for the study using a simple random sampling technique. Structured questions administered by an interviewer were used to collect data. Multivariable binary logistic regression was used to identify the determining factors.

Results: Healthcare workers’ lifetime and one-year prevalence of needlestick injuries were 39.0% (95% CI: 33.6-44.8) and 19.9% (95% CI: 15.2-24.5), respectively. The lifetime and one-year prevalence of blood and body fluid exposures were 42.6% (95% CI: 36.8-48.4) and 29.2% (95% CI: 23.8-34.7), respectively. Almost three out of five healthcare workers, 62.8% (95% CI: 57.0-68.9) had adequate risk perception, and 41.2% (95% CI: 35.4-46.9) adopted good standards of precautionary practice. Service year (AOR: 2.40; 95% CI:1.00-5.77) and having poor standards of precautionary practice (AOR: 2.30; 95% CI: 1.18-4.46) were the determinants of needlestick injuries.

Conclusions: The high prevalence of occupational exposure and healthcare workers’ sub-optimal practice of taking standard precautions seemed to be common. Long-term and in-service, focused, short-term training was found to be helpful in increasing awareness of the risks and reducing exposure to them.  [Ethiop. J. Health Dev. 2019;33(1):1-8] 


Keywords: Blood and body fluid exposure; needlestick injuries; risk perception; standard precautions; Ethiopia

View Article
February 2019

Assessment of knowledge and practices of healthcare workers towards infection prevention and associated factors in healthcare facilities of West Arsi District, Southeast Ethiopia: a facility-based cross-sectional study

Geberemariyam BS, Donka GM and Wordofa B. Assessment of knowledge and practices of healthcare workers towards infection prevention and associated factors in healthcare facilities of West Arsi District, Southeast Ethiopia: a facility-based cross-sectional study. Archives of Public Health (2018) 76:69

Archives of Public Health

Background: The prevention of healthcare associated infections is central to the provision of safe, high quality healthcare. Infections acquired in healthcare facilities are a major public health concern, contributing to increased morbidity, mortality, and cost in both developed and developing countries. Although most of these infections can be prevented with relatively inexpensive infection prevention and control measures in many developing countries, in sub-Saharan African healthcare facilities have no effective infection prevention programs. Additionally, there is limited information on healthcare worker infection prevention knowledge and practice in countries such as Ethiopia. The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge and practices of healthcare workers with respect to infection prevention and associated factors in healthcare facilities in southeast Ethiopia. Methods: A facility-based cross-sectional study design was used to study healthcare workers in the southeast, Ethiopia. Multi-stage sampling was employed to select 680 healthcare workers from 30 randomly selected healthcare facilities. Data was collected using a self-administered structured questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were computed. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with healthcare workers infection prevention knowledge and practice. Results: A total of 648 healthcare workers participated in this study, for a response rate of 95.3%. Of these, 53.7% (95% CI: 49.8, 57.4%) and 36.3% (95% CI: 32.4, 40.1%) of the respondents were assessed as knowledgeable and reported safe infection prevention practices respectively. The likelihood of self-reporting safe infection prevention practice significantly increased if healthcare workers had received training (AOR=5.31; 95% CI: 2.42,11.63) and had infection prevention guidelines available (AOR=3.34; 95% CI: 1.65, 6.76). Healthcare workers were more likely to have infection prevention knowledge if they worked longer ten years or more (AOR=3.41; 95% CI: 1.22, 9.55); worked in facilities with infection prevention committees (AOR=1.78; 95% CI: 1.01, 3.13), had infection prevention guidelines available (AOR=2.44; 95% CI: 1.45, 4.12); had training (AOR=5.02; 95% CI: 1.45, 8.59). Conclusions: Inadequate infection prevention knowledge and unsafe practices were frequent among study participants, reflecting a potentially common problem at public healthcare facilities in southeast Ethiopia. Healthcare workers have better knowledge and safer practices if they had received infection prevention training and had infection prevention guidelines in their workplace. Interventions should be designed to consider these identified factors.

View Article
November 2018

Sanitation practice and associated factors among slum dwellers residing in urban slums of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: A community based cross-sectional study

Sahiledengle B, Alemseged F, Belachew T. Sanitation practice and associated factors among slum dwellers residing in urban slums of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: A community based cross-sectional study.

Journal of Public Health and Epidemiology

View Article
October 2018
3 Reads

Infection Prevention Practices and Associated Factors among Healthcare Workers in Governmental Healthcare Facilities in Addis Ababa.

Ethiop J Health Sci 2018 Mar;28(2):177-186

Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Public Health, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ejhs.v28i2.9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6016341PMC
March 2018
11 Reads

Healthcare Waste Segregation, Treatment and Disposal Practice in Governmental Healthcare Facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Sahiledengle B , Gebresilassie A , Hiko D, Getahun T. Healthcare Waste Segregation, Treatment and Disposal Practice in Governmental Healthcare Facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies & Management. 2018; 11(1): 73-85.

Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies & Management

View Article
February 2018
138 Reads

Instrument processing knowledge and practice amongst healthcare workers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Geberemariyam BS. Instrument processing knowledge and practice amongst healthcare workers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. International Journal of Infection Control. 2018 Jul 21;14(2).

International Journal of Infection Control

View Article
5 Reads

Top co-authors

Azeb Gebresilassie
Azeb Gebresilassie

School of Public Health

1
Tadesse Getahun
Tadesse Getahun

Jimma University

1
Desta Hiko
Desta Hiko

Jimma University

1
Mekonnen Tegegne
Mekonnen Tegegne

Madda Walabu University

1