Publications by authors named "Bine Kjoeller Bjerregaard"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Treatment Patterns, Socioeconomic Status and Clinical Burden in Mild COPD: A Swedish Real-World, Retrospective Cohort Study, the ARCTIC Study.

Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis 2022 21;17:1409-1421. Epub 2022 Jun 21.

Department of Medical Sciences: Respiratory, Allergy and Sleep Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.

Background: Patients with mild chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) account for more than half of the total COPD population but are often undiagnosed and sparsely studied. This real-world, longitudinal study compared the socioeconomic burden, clinical characteristics and treatment patterns in patients with mild COPD and age- and gender-matched controls.

Patients And Methods: Our population included mild COPD patients (forced expiratory volume in one second ≥80% of predicted value) and reference controls from 52 Swedish primary care centres over 15 years (2000-2014). We linked electronic medical record (EMR) data to Sweden's National Health Registries. The outcomes analyzed were socioeconomic status including annual income from work, presence of comorbidities and the use of medications.

Results: 844 patients with mild COPD were included in this study and matched with 844 reference controls. Compared with the reference controls, mild COPD patients had a significantly lower annual income from work (mean difference, men: 12,559€ and women: 7143€) and were significantly less likely to be married or employed. The presence of comorbidities, including cardiovascular disease, anxiety and depression (only women) was significantly higher in mild COPD patients. The use of medications, such as proton pump inhibitors, antidepressants, central painkillers and sleep medications, was significantly higher in the mild COPD group.

Conclusion: Mild COPD presents a considerable socioeconomic and clinical burden compared with reference controls The findings suggest that COPD constitutes a condition that influences health status even in mild disease clearly demanding an increased need for early detection and treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/COPD.S364932DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9233559PMC
June 2022

The Impact of Exacerbation Frequency on Clinical and Economic Outcomes in Swedish COPD Patients: The ARCTIC Study.

Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis 2021;16:701-713. Epub 2021 Mar 18.

IQVIA Solutions, Real World Evidence Solutions, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the association between exacerbation frequency and clinical and economic outcomes in patients with COPD.

Patients And Methods: Electronic medical record data linked to National Health Registries were collected from COPD patients at 52 Swedish primary care centers (2000-2014). The outcomes analyzed were exacerbation rate, mortality, COPD treatments, lung function and healthcare costs during the follow-up period. Based on the exacerbation rate two years before index date, the patients were initially classified into three groups, either 0, 1 or ≥2 exacerbations per year. After the index date, the classification into exacerbation groups was updated each year based on the exacerbation rate during the last year of follow-up. A sensitivity analysis was conducted excluding patients with asthma diagnosis from the analysis.

Results: In total 18,586 COPD patients were analyzed. A majority of the patients (60-70%) who either have had no exacerbation or frequent exacerbations (≥2/year) during the pre-index period remained in their group (ie, with 0 or ≥2 annual exacerbations) during up to 11 years of follow-up. Compared with having no exacerbation, mortality was higher in patients having 1 (HR; 2.06 [1.93-2.20]) and ≥2 (4.58 [4.33-4.84]) exacerbations at any time during the follow-up. Lung function decline was more rapid in patients with frequent exacerbations and there was an almost linear relationship between exacerbations frequency and mortality. Total healthcare costs were higher in the frequent exacerbation group (≥2/year) than in patients with no or one exacerbation annually (p<0.0001 for both). The results did not differ from the main analysis after exclusion of patients with a concurrent asthma diagnosis.

Conclusion: In addition to faster lung function decline and increased mortality, frequent exacerbations in COPD patients imply a significant economic burden.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/COPD.S297943DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7987259PMC
June 2021

Inhaled corticosteroids and the risk of type 2 diabetes among Swedish COPD patients.

NPJ Prim Care Respir Med 2020 10 20;30(1):47. Epub 2020 Oct 20.

Integrative Toxicology, The National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

This study reports the association of ICS use and the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Swedish patients with COPD using data from real-world, primary care settings. A total of 7078 patients with COPD were included in this analysis and the 5-year cumulative incidence rate per 100,000 person years was 1506.9. The yearly incidence rate per 100,000 person years ranged from 850 to 1919. Use of ICS especially at a high dose in patients with COPD was related to an increased risk of T2DM.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41533-020-00207-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7576803PMC
October 2020

Osteoporosis and fracture risk associated with inhaled corticosteroid use among Swedish COPD patients: the ARCTIC study.

Eur Respir J 2021 02 17;57(2). Epub 2021 Feb 17.

Intergrative Toxicology, National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.

The effect of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) on the risk of osteoporosis and fracture in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to assess this risk in patients with COPD.Electronic medical record data linked to National Health Registries were collected from COPD patients and matched reference controls at 52 Swedish primary care centres from 2000 to 2014. The outcomes analysed were the effect of ICS on all fractures, fractures typically related to osteoporosis, recorded osteoporosis diagnosis, prescriptions of drugs for osteoporosis and a combined measure of any osteoporosis-related event. The COPD patients were stratified by the level of ICS exposure.A total of 9651 patients with COPD and 59 454 matched reference controls were analysed. During the follow-up, 19.9% of COPD patients had at least one osteoporosis-related event compared with 12.9% of reference controls (p<0.0001). Multivariate analysis in the COPD population demonstrated a dose-effect relationship, with high-dose ICS being significantly associated with any osteoporosis-related event (risk ratio 1.52 (95% CI 1.24-1.62)), while the corresponding estimate for low-dose ICS was 1.27 (95% CI 1.13-1.56) compared with COPD patients not using ICS. A similar dose-related adverse effect was found for all four of the specific osteoporosis-related events: all fractures, fractures typically related to osteoporosis, prescriptions of drugs for osteoporosis and diagnosis of osteoporosis.We conclude that patients with COPD have a greater risk of bone fractures and osteoporosis, and high-dose ICS use increased this risk further.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1183/13993003.00515-2020DOI Listing
February 2021

Gender differences among Swedish COPD patients: results from the ARCTIC, a real-world retrospective cohort study.

NPJ Prim Care Respir Med 2019 12 10;29(1):45. Epub 2019 Dec 10.

Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.

The present study aimed to generate real-world evidence regarding gender differences among chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, especially as regards the diagnosis and outcomes in order to identify areas for improvement and management and optimize the associated healthcare resource allocation. ARCTIC is a large, real-world, retrospective cohort study conducted in Swedish COPD patients and a matched reference population from 52 primary care centers in 2000-2014. The incidence of COPD, prevalence of asthma and other comorbidities, risk of exacerbations, mortality rate, COPD drug prescriptions, and healthcare resource utilization were analyzed. In total, 17,479 patients with COPD were included in the study. During the study period, COPD was more frequent among women (53.8%) and women with COPD experienced more exacerbations vs. men (6.66 vs. 4.66). However, the overall mortality rate was higher in men compared with women (45% vs. 38%), but no difference for mortality due to COPD was seen between genders over the study period. Women seemed to have a greater susceptibility to asthma, fractures, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, rhinitis, depression, and anxiety, but appeared less likely to have diabetes, kidney diseases, and cardiovascular diseases. Furthermore, women had a greater risk of COPD-related hospitalization and were likely to receive a significantly higher number of COPD drug prescriptions compared with men. These results support the need to reduce disease burden among women with COPD and highlight the role of healthcare professionals in primary care who should consider all these parameters in order to properly diagnose and treat women with COPD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41533-019-0157-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6904454PMC
December 2019
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