Publications by authors named "Bianca Palma Santana"

4 Publications

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Comparing different methods to fix and to dehydrate cells on alginate hydrogel scaffolds using scanning electron microscopy.

Microsc Res Tech 2015 Jul 14;78(7):553-61. Epub 2015 Apr 14.

Technology Development Center, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, RS, Brazil.

Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is commonly used in the analysis of scaffolds morphology, as well as cell attachment, morphology and spreading on to the scaffolds. However, so far a specific methodology to prepare the alginate hydrogel (AH) scaffolds for SEM analysis has not been evaluated. This study compared different methods to fix/dehydrate cells in AH scaffolds for SEM analysis. AH scaffolds were prepared and seeded with NIH/3T3 cell line; fixed with glutaraldehyde, osmium tetroxide, or the freeze drying method and analyzed by SEM. Results demonstrated that the freeze dried method interferes less with cell morphology and density, and preserves the scaffolds structure. The fixation with glutaraldehyde did not affect cells morphology and density; however, the scaffolds morphology was affected in some level. The fixation with osmium tetroxide interfered in the natural structure of cells and scaffold. In conclusion the freeze drying and glutaraldehyde are suitable methods for cell fixation in AH scaffold for SEM, although scaffolds structure seems to be affected by glutaraldehyde.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jemt.22508DOI Listing
July 2015

Preparation, modification, and characterization of alginate hydrogel with nano-/microfibers: a new perspective for tissue engineering.

Biomed Res Int 2013 5;2013:307602. Epub 2013 Jun 5.

Nucleus of Cellular and Tecidual Biology (NCTBio), Post-Graduate Program in Dentistry, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, RS, Brazil.

We aimed to develop an alginate hydrogel (AH) modified with nano-/microfibers of titanium dioxide (nfTD) and hydroxyapatite (nfHY) and evaluated its biological and chemical properties. Nano-/microfibers of nfTD and nfHY were combined with AH, and its chemical properties were evaluated by FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-Ray analysis, and the cytocompatibility by the WST-1 assay. The results demonstrate that the association of nfTD and nfHY nano-/microfibers to AH did not modified the chemical characteristics of the scaffold and that the association was not cytotoxic. In the first 3 h of culture with NIH/3T3 cells nfHY AH scaffolds showed a slight increase in cell viability when compared to AH alone or associated with nfTD. However, an increase in cell viability was observed in 24 h when nfTD was associated with AH scaffold. In conclusion our study demonstrates that the combination of nfHY and nfTD nano-/microfibers in AH scaffold maintains the chemical characteristics of alginate and that this association is cytocompatible. Additionally the combination of nfHY with AH favored cell viability in a short term, and the addition of nfTD increased cell viability in a long term.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/307602DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3687604PMC
February 2014

Nano-/microfiber scaffold for tissue engineering: physical and biological properties.

J Biomed Mater Res A 2012 Nov 19;100(11):3051-8. Epub 2012 Jun 19.

Department of Operative Dentistry School of Dentistry, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, RS, Brazil.

Alginate hydrogel (AH) has intrinsic physical and biological limitations that hinder its broader application in tissue engineering. We hypothesized that the inclusion of nanofibers in the hydrogel and the use of a biotemplate that mimics nature would enhance the translational potential of alginate hydrogels. In this study, we have shown a method to obtain nano-/microfibers of titanium (nfTD) and hydroxyapatite (nfHY) using cotton as a biotemplate. These fibers were incorporated in the alginate hydrogel and the mechanical characteristics and biological response to these reinforced materials were evaluated. We observed that these nanofibers resembled the structure of natural collagen and did not mediate cell toxicity. The incorporation of nfTD or nfHY to the AH has not increased the viscosity of the hydrogel. Therefore, this is a feasible method to produce a scaffold with improved physical characteristics, while at the same time generating an enhanced environment for cell adhesion and proliferation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jbm.a.34242DOI Listing
November 2012

Ex vivo comparison of the accuracy of Root ZX II in detecting apical constriction using different meter's reading.

Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod 2009 Jul 22;108(1):e41-5. Epub 2009 May 22.

Department of Endodontics, Associação Brasileira de Odontologia, Uberlândia, Minas Gerais, Brazil.

The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of Root ZX II to locate the apical constriction with the display meter set at "0.5" and "1'"reading. Seventy single-rooted teeth were soaked in an alginate model and randomly distributed in 2 groups (n = 35). Measurements were taken following canal irrigation with 1% NaOCl. The length was established using a #20 K-file attached to the holder when the display indicator reached the marks "0.5" (group I) or "1" (group II), after the meter read "Apex." Then, the file was fixed in position and the teeth removed from the alginate. The apical portion of the root was shaved until the tip of the file could be seen, the distance to the apical constriction verified by means of a stereomicroscope and the measurements compared. Statistical analysis was performed by using Student t test with the null hypothesis set as 5%. The mean positions of the file tip relative to the apical constriction were -0.23 +/- 0.39 mm and -0.42 +/- 0.45 for groups I and II, respectively, with no statistical difference (P > .05). The accuracy was 90.5% and 83.78% for the Root ZX II "0.5" and "1" readings, respectively. It was concluded that the meter reading "1" of Root ZX II reduced the risk of working length overestimation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tripleo.2009.03.009DOI Listing
July 2009